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lee coleman

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Oct 22, 2010, 12:58:48 PM10/22/10
to daikudojo





Hi Jason

Here are a few shots of my solutions.  The best ones are what you evolve over time, so don't try to get it "perfect."  It will happen gradually.  What you see first is a veritas twin screw vise mounted on the end of the bench.  I have drilled out  for three dowels with a little shoulder on each, so that boards can be planed using these as stops.


Next, you see a sliding support (tracks above and below, and the holes can be used for a bench "hold down" (see one on the next email}.  This is used in combination with the series of holes in the legs of the bench, where a dowel can be placed to support large boards for edge planing.  If this isn't clear, look in the 'Workbench Book' by Taunton Press and you will see such things.


Next you see the opposite end of the bench, where I have two more vises. The one on the left is a "rapid action," so one counterclockwise turn allows you to pull the vise in or out rapidly.  Convenient, but no big deal.  The one on the right is a knock off of the famous Emert patternmaker vise.  Enormously versatile, since it swivels  in two directions, and the jaws can be adjusted for differing tapers.  On top of the bench is a "bench on a bench," as coined by Jeff Miller, who has an article in Fine Woodworking about making this gadget.  Extremely handy for certain jobs where you will save your back, and/or want to do detailed work without straining.  For example, using a plunge router without any guides.  After awhille, especially when you are standing up straight instead of bending over, I am quite comfortable routing right up to a line with a plunge router.  The bench on a bench is easily removed when you need your entire bench top surface.


Ok, just had a technical glitch, so I will be sending a second email with three more pictures.

lee




lee coleman

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Oct 22, 2010, 12:59:00 PM10/22/10
to daikudojo
Ok, so this shows a "holdown" or whatever it is called.  I don't use it as often anymore, since with japanese planes and a stop, most things are planed simply on the bench top or a planing beam. There are still times, however, when an oddly shaped piece works best with a hold down.

next, just a shot of how the stops in the end vise are used.


Finally,  I have a planing beam.  It can be removed with I need the floor space for something big.
Have fun....

lee

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