Bridge Street Slip Road in Ipswich | Suffolk County Council

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Shaun McDonald

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Feb 13, 2021, 6:10:11 PM2/13/21
to 'STEVE WILLETT' via Cycle Ipswich
Hi folks,

There’s a consultation out regarding the Bridge Street changes to make that area more pedestrian and cycle friendly.
There’s some more changes planned that those that currently exist, including adjusting the positioning of the crossings.

The Closing date is the 19th March 2021.

Shaun

Chris Taylor

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Feb 14, 2021, 3:36:53 AM2/14/21
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Interesting to look at the 'response to the trial' statistics
anyone on this forum one of the 118 who think the "Scheme is not working at all" ?
the stats don't seem to identify the type of user.

...Chris

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Phil Smart-(Cllr)

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Feb 14, 2021, 5:00:01 AM2/14/21
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I would be interested to learn what benefit accrues to cyclists from this scheme, particularly northbound but also heading south from the town centre. In both cases it seems that discounting is necessary to use the crossings. From the east, it works as a 'cycle only' left filter. This is fine provided we accept a trade off as by taking capacity out of the roundabout, there will be longer queues on College st and Key street which already suffer from poor air quality.


From: cycle-...@googlegroups.com <cycle-...@googlegroups.com> on behalf of Chris Taylor <christay...@gmail.com>
Sent: Sunday, February 14, 2021 8:36:41 AM
To: cycle-...@googlegroups.com <cycle-...@googlegroups.com>
Subject: Re: [cycle-ipswich] Bridge Street Slip Road in Ipswich | Suffolk County Council
 

 

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Chris Taylor

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Feb 14, 2021, 5:40:26 AM2/14/21
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Hi Phil,

 

As someone who lives in a village north of Ipswich and likes to cycle down to the shotley peninsular and back I’m faced with two options. Either skirt west of Ipswich or directly through the middle. Over the years the middle option has become easier and easier with the continual improvements seen in Ipswich. This particular one in conjunction with the Upper Brook street closure has created a very viable north south route directly through the town centre. I have also followed NCN 1 into town and ended up at the docks, where the segregation measures seem to work well and connect directly with the bridge street scheme.

Regarding the ‘dismounting’ Issue. Yes that is the case and a small price to pay. In an ideal world (such as in the Netherland) Pedestrians and cyclists would be given priority over motorised vehicles when it comes to crossings, junctions, entrance ways, etc.  We as a country are a long way off from that ideal, although the new Dutch style roundabout in Cambridge does give a glimmer of hope. Re air pollution, I think the pandemic has reduced car use in Ipswich to some degree, it would be interesting to see some stats on both vehicle movements and air pollution, both pre pandemic and now.

regards ...Chris


David Penny

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Feb 14, 2021, 5:45:56 AM2/14/21
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Hi Phil,
Taking your final point last. The main cause of poor air quality is from concentrations of motor vehicle exhaust emissions and particles from brake pads and tyres. The situation can logically only be improved by having fewer motorised vehicles on the roads. A major improvement in this situation would be to increase the numbers of people walking, cycling, scooting etc. By far the main reason that people cite for not doing so is because they don't feel safe. In order to achieve this shift over time it is necessary to provide protected 'safe' infrastructure. And this infrastructure needs to be contiguous and so that people who need to get places can do so in relatively straight lines. With Bridge Street, north and south could be so were the crossings adjusted accordingly. With increasing use, priority could transfer to cyclists and pedestrians and so dismounting becomes unnecessary which further increases the attraction of cycling and walking. 2 lanes for cars becomes unnecessary, as largely only those who need to use their cars do so. The constant rumble of traffic and poor air quality in Ipswich town centre decreases and it becomes a more attractive and pleasant place to be. Bridge Street is a small but important part of a bigger picture. This area in particular though, could be so much more pleasant by putting people rather than the motor vehicle first.


From: cycle-...@googlegroups.com <cycle-...@googlegroups.com> on behalf of Phil Smart-(Cllr) <phil....@councillors.ipswich.gov.uk>
Sent: 14 February 2021 09:59

Leo Borwick

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Feb 14, 2021, 5:57:47 AM2/14/21
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I agree with Chris that the Bridge Street changes are an improvement, if not perfect.  The crossing could be improved a bit with minor adjustments to ensure that cyclists and pedestrians have as direct as possible routes with shorter wait times.

As I understand it pollution levels have crept back up in the UK generally since the first lockdown, as motor traffic has returned to levels approaching what they were.  I doubt if Ipswich is any different.  The road planning philosophy of continually removing bottlenecks to increase overall capacity for motor traffic may achieve short-term and localised relief, but it is easy to see that it makes the problem worse in the longer run.  Increased capacity simply leads to more traffic volume, which leads to worse pollution.  The only way out of this is to create infrastructure that makes it easier and feels safer for people to walk and cycle and, I'm afraid, makes it less convenient to drive everywhere.

Leo

Phil Smart-(Cllr)

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Feb 14, 2021, 6:08:00 AM2/14/21
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Thanks Chris and Leo. Unfortunately traffic likely to build back to pre covid levels fairly quickly, particularly in the light of government messaging around using (or rather not using) public transport. Eventually technology will rescue us if we move to all electric cars but getting there will be a long and expensive journey

From: cycle-...@googlegroups.com <cycle-...@googlegroups.com> on behalf of Leo Borwick <leobo...@gmail.com>
Sent: Sunday, February 14, 2021 10:57:34 AM

David Penny

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Feb 14, 2021, 6:41:50 AM2/14/21
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Don't know if you missed my earlier contribution Phil. For the sake of future generations though our generation must think of the legacy we are leaving behind. Re electric cars, materials extraction, parts transport and manufacture mean that each car would take over 2 years average use to repay its carbon footprint. They do nothing to mitigate the micro-particles shed from brake pads and tyres. If all the world's motorised vehicles were replaced by electric ones today, the world's lithium supply would either be exhausted or too prohibitively expensive (and damaging) to extract in around 40 years. Most people in Ipswich can't afford them. They are at best a short-term fix. Longer term / real solutions are needed.
If the right messaging is given, public transport use, should come back.


Sent: 14 February 2021 11:07

David Penny

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Feb 14, 2021, 6:57:35 AM2/14/21
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From: David Penny <dave...@hotmail.com>
Sent: 14 February 2021 10:45

David Penny

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Feb 14, 2021, 6:58:09 AM2/14/21
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From: David Penny <dave...@hotmail.com>
Sent: 14 February 2021 11:41

Sue Hagley

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Feb 14, 2021, 8:12:30 AM2/14/21
to Cycle Ipswich
Hi all
What a depressingly unambitious and negative response from a local councillor.  I wonder what planet he is living on if he believes, as he says,  "Eventually technology will rescue us if we move to all electric cars". Ipswich Borough Council declared a Climate and Ecological Emergency which seems to boil down to a few electric cars and some trees,  this is not the leadership we need in the time of crisis.  Getting people safely on bikes and walking and keeping most cars out of town is what they should be aiming for not just changing one set of vehicles for another. 

Leo Borwick

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Feb 14, 2021, 11:48:42 AM2/14/21
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Just to put the air pollution point into perspective, a recent piece of research by the British Lung Foundation (https://www.blf.org.uk/air-quality) found that every NHS hospital site, GP surgery and clinic in Ipswich is in an area where pollution from particulates (PM2.5) exceeds the WHO maximum recommended level.  In fact, four of the top twenty medical sites in the UK on this measure are in Ipswich.  The same would be true of schools, care homes and other facilities where clean air is of particular importance.

Thanks,

Leo

Shaun McDonald

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Mar 1, 2021, 6:59:18 PM3/1/21
to 'STEVE WILLETT' via Cycle Ipswich
Hi,

You’ve reminded me of a conversation that I had with someone some time ago who really enjoyed driving and would drive from one end of a car park to another instead of walking. Paraphrasing: They asked me if I’d still be against using cars even if they were electric. To which my answer was, cars whatever energy source they have  are not the right options for many particularly short journeys. Electric vehicles still pollute, and don’t solve issues such as road danger, lack of physical activity, and obesity. 

We need a major shift away from the private motor vehicle for short journeys to be able to solve many of the worlds issues.

Going back to the original topic…

One downside of the move of the pedestrian crossing is the loss of the direct route from the waterfront to the skate park and river path. Not sure how this compares to the usage in the other direction which is also needed in terms of a direct route towards Grafton Way and restaurants/cinema, though a more direct route that way has been badly needed due to the large number of people I’ve seen crossing the more direct route.

My other concern is the continued mixing of pedestrians and cyclists, I’d have hoped that there would have been a possibility to take a motor vehicle lane out between the roundabout and waterfront access, so that a 2 way cycle track could be implemented, which would remove the conflict between pedestrians and cyclists on this busy section of route. It’s good to see that they are looking to move the wall which will help to increase the width of shared use pavement, however I’d still prefer to see the separation of pedestrians and cyclists wherever possible. It could be that moving kerbs would be too cost prohibitive, and a fear of a bigger backlash for taking yet more motor vehicle space away. Though I wonder if the central reservation is actually required, maybe that could be used for the extra motor vehicle lane, so could potentially get the best of both.

Longer term, taking out a motor vehicle lane all the way to Dock Street for a protected cycle track on National Cycle Route 1 would be ideal. Though that would take a lot more reconfiguration and cost of the motor vehicle lanes. Would likely need rather a lot more people cycling before that’ll happen sadly.

Shaun McDonald

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Mar 6, 2021, 3:23:33 AM3/6/21
to 'STEVE WILLETT' via Cycle Ipswich
Hi,

The other thing that I was going to mention is the number of junctions. Junctions are where collisions and near misses are most likely to occur. The more that we can reduce the places that there is a risk of a collision the better. 
Also junctions are a cause of congestion. The more junctions you have the more points there for traffic to be slowed down whilst vehicles are waiting to turn. Granted it is a bit counter intuitive, however one motor traffic levels get higher, this is the sort of thing that happens.

Shaun

STEVE WILLETT

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Jun 20, 2021, 4:52:49 AM6/20/21
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Hi Shaun,


FYI

Below is is a very recent long "thread" on a local "Nextdoor social site" about the potential road closures etc in this area.

Interesting cross section of views, please forward to Leo etc if you feel it is relevant


Steve Willett



Traffic, Rat Run and Safety. Hi All For everyone's information and to keep everyone up to date regarding pending road closures to stop rat running: I have been talking to SCC and IBC for about 2 years regarding various schemes to stop parking, speeding and rat running, and we did make some progress including meeting with various SCC and Traffic people (it's me that did the survey about 12 months ago). Then the pandemic came along, which for this scheme beneficial as there was money allocated for road closures, and the plan was to close Devonshire Road at the Back Hamlet end, and Gladstone Road at the Devonshire Road end, thus creating a cul-de-sac. There was also a plan to close Alan Road to stop Cavendish being used as a rat run. This plan was scuppered by a number of things including IBC waste complaining that they wouldn't be able to turn their vehicles and officials being paranoid about big changes; there had been some pushback from drivers complaining about nor being able to park. The current situation is as follows: I have email agreements from Paul West, the SCC traffic lead that they will be closing Cavendish Street just below White Elm Street, cutting off the rat run. This is my last communication from him on May 1st 2021: "Hi Nick I will ask officers, although last time I checked in on this they were waiting for sign off on the detail from Ipswich Borough Council from the point of view of the refuse lorry accessibility. It had been agreed verbally but because verbal agreements had not always held on other schemes when it came to implementation I asked them to get written confirmation from IBC before it is implemented. I will chase it up. It might be that it has been forthcoming since I last enquired." I have every reason to believe this will happen, but, we have just had local elections and a certain sense of security may have come over Paul West so I intend to start to chase again. Please feel free to contact me if you would like to assist in the fight to stop Rosehill being the largest FREE car park in Ipswich... Thanks Nick Garnett

Posted in Safety To Anyone

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Jay Babs
Hi Nick. Thanks for all the work you have done. Devonshire Road is a FREE car park for people who work at the University. The last time I checked the university charges its folks £2.50 a day to park. And as Back Hamlet is resident parking only, they park on Devonshire Road. The road is on the rat run route for sure. And now you have people parking on the bottom end of Devonshire Road making it dangerous to drive uphill if there is a car already coming down hill. Maybe the solution is double yellow lines on the steep bit of Devonshire Road. And resident parking only for residents.(edited)
21h
Nick Garnett
Our original aim was to implement residents parking for the whole area, we were supported by several local councillors and the mayor but they just out technical obstacles in our way, but my aim is still to replicate the Cambridge model in making the whole town resident parking.
21 hrs ago
Paul Daley
Hi Nick, I would be happy to assist. Please let me know how I can help
21 hrs ago
Nick Garnett
That's kind of you Paul I'll let you know when we need to start an 'email your councillor' campaign
21 hrs ago
Al Dwell
HAVE YOUR SAY ON CLOSURE OF CAVENDISH ST https://nextdoor.co.uk/p/sZXPzHyKR4n6?utm_content=d&utm_source=share&extras=MTc1OTIxOTEzNjA4MzQ%3D&init_source=copy_link_share The university parking issue is a problem as it is round Suffolk One in south Ipswich. The solution is not residents parking but to limit parking to a maximum of 1 hour between 10.30 and 12 unless the vehicle is registered to an address in the Street - and make sure it is enforced daily during the week. The CEO’s can access that data easily from DVLA. I concur with the double yellow lines on the bottom of Devonshire Road. Residents parking zones are a very inefficient NIMBY approach to the problem. Comparing Ipswich to Cambridge is a misnomer as the Orwell is a major traffic impediment which the Cam is not. The council needs to work towards (a) Improving traffic flows- queuing traffic causes all the pollution (b) Making all parking in town centre etc free. (c) Removing all the blocked roads - all they are doing is pushing the problem around and slowing the traffic and increasing journey length still further causing more pollution. No one will use a rat run out of choice only out of necessity!! At times it takes 40 mins to travel from one side of town to another. d) A scrappage scheme set at £5-7000 to get people to shift to electric e) free on road charging points for all houses on the Victorian Streets in the town(edited)
9h
Steven Swaby
Al Dwell Excellent ideas and solution's. Better than unfeasible resident only schemes.
16 hrs ago
Steven Swaby
What about us who live at the top of Cavendish street and drive down it to go to work? Which way are you now expecting us to go?
17 hrs ago
Nick Garnett
I take your point but I think we all have to compromise for the greater good? There will be less traffic and crazy parking
15 hrs ago
Al Dwell
The single thing which would most reduce congestion in SE Central Ipswich would be for the road crossings at the University to be as originally approved and not the current lights outside the Hold. The planning approved scheme was shelved because of cost
14 hrs ago
Al Dwell
In recent months most people going into town have been doing it to CROSS the town centre. In the last few weeks as the town centre has ‘picked’ up in the day- not rush hour- Spring Rd regularly has traffic queuing up to the viaduct, Grove Lane has traffic up to Back Hamlet and the docks is one long traffic jam. People need to be able to move and if it is easier to drive from Kesgrave to Woodbridge than Ipswich that is what will happen - traffic restrictions are killing the town centre and its businesses
14 hrs ago
Martin Old
Why did we ever abandon the proposed Northern Bypass. Taking traffic away from some of the more congested arterial routes could have improved traffic flows north of the river.
6 hrs ago
Lynsey Dowson
Who’s running the highways Stevie wonder??? Worst thing ever was to shut off back hamlet now all these roads on Colchester road are blocked off, my opinion is you’re just making all these roads worst and moving “rat runs” to other roads !!
14 hrs ago
Nick Garnett
I hope there aren't any 'stevie wonders' in this group as they might be ever so slightly offended
14 hrs ago
Al Dwell
So adopt a policy for public sector bodies in the town that their staff must use public transport and live in the town boundaries as a condition of employment. There is a big fuss at the hospital over parking - doctors on 100+K ( same applies for lecturers etc at Uni) living in pretty Suffolk villages get parking spaces. Ancillary staff on minimum wages working longer shifts have to use public transport. LOCAL SERVICES for LOCAL PEOPLE - OUT OF TOWNERs should PAY or STAY AWAY. If the council/ hospital/ Uni /schools and hopefully from the private sector the solicitors firms and insurance companies adopted that as a policy it would have a DRAMATIC effect on the town traffic shops and house values not to mention the urban social mix! Ipswich’s problem is the wealth it generates goes out of the town to the villages/Kesgrave leaving an inner city type ghetto being filled by a council with open housing policy(edited)
9h
Nick Garnett
Well that's the idea behind residents parking, it's for residents and if implemented you also lose the attendant traffic. The other big issue commercial vehicles brought home by employees, companies are reducing parking at work and staff have to take vehicles home, in Devonshire road we have a long wheel Base DPD van every night and a selection of mobile traffic signal vehicles. This would all be stopped by residents parking. We would have to pay to cover the admin costs of running the system but imagine the peace and tranquility it would bring us...
14 hrs ago
Martin Old
Do we not already have something similar embedded into our Planning laws - or we used to but not sure now the Tory party wants to reduce / remove local decisions. All new buildings with staffing over a given number have to provide employee parking and / or a transport plan. Having worked at both Grafton and Endeavour Houses I know this to be the case. Not too sure how a body like Suffolk Council which has offices here in Ipswich and requires many of its employees to visit all over Suffolk could make living in another public bodies geographical boundaries a condition of employment. I am also convinced that hospital and university contracts of employment will not specify how they travel to work. In fact many shift workers at these sites may not have access to public transport because it does not run 24 hours a day, 7 days a week unlike their shift patterns. Of course your approach makes the big assumption that we have an adequate and integrated public transport system in place that is affordable to its customers and council tax payers ( as they would no doubt have to subside some services ) If you are instead implying here that better paid staff have access to privileged parking spaces and lower staff do not then this is probably a fundamental truism but also probably based upon a risk assessment of enabling key strategic staff a more immediate and direct access to the workplace as and when required. As this post is about traffic congestion I am failing to see how the issues of types and values of housing stock in an urban or rural setting are relevant.
6 hrs ago
Al Dwell
So where does the workman’s work vehicle go? In the real world for a lot of people work from home requires their vehicle to come with them. The towns parking zones don’t work for households that need 2-3 vehicles. Every parking space needs to be used effectively. As I live in a side road off Spring and Woodbridge Road should the residents of those roads not park in MY street outside MY house - do I have more right to park there than a ‘neighbour’ who lives 400m away who puts his car there so the main road is easily traversed by ambulances from the hospital? Parking permits simply move the problem and are an administrative cash monster that promulgate a self serving bureaucracy - traffic needs radical solutions not musical chairs(edited)
10h
Jo Grant
All this is just causing congestion. Forcing everyone having to go one route, it’s not practical. Closing Leopold Road etc. is forcing all the traffic along Colchester Road which is already a highly polluted area. The queues along there now are terrible. Surely roads were made to be used, the more routes people can use mean less congestion and less pollution.
7 hrs ago
Laurence Berry
I get this, I also think roads were meant to be shared and have over time become dominated by cars. Do you think it is necessary or possible to reduce car use?
24 mins ago
Jo Grant
Only reply if we agree with you I see. Typical!!!
7 hrs ago
Laurence Berry
I lived in Hackney during the pandemic and I saw the area change from rat runs to a people friendly area in just a year. Their plan is to actively reduce driving in the area as it has become unsustainable (more parking = more cars) and to increase tree canopy to reduce temperatures. Obviously this wound a lot of people up but it’s bold and possible.
37 mins ago
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