Eastern Veil Nebula NGC 6992

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timc

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Oct 26, 2021, 3:52:04 PM10/26/21
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Attached is an image of the eastern loop of the Veil Nebula (NGC 6992, Caldwell 33) in Cygnus.  The Veil Nebula is a vast cloud of heated ionised gas and dust formed from a supernova remnant which exploded between 10 and 20 thousand years ago.  The whole supernova remnant (of which this is just a part) measures about 3 degrees of sky (or roughly 6 Moon diameters).  I’ve previously imaged this part of the nebula using my Tak 85 telescope which gives a wider field of view.  For this image I used my Televue NP101is 4 inch refractor telescope which gives more of a close-up view.  This image consists of the following 300s sub-exposures: Lx68, Rx41, Gx40, Bx51 all unbinned and Hax54 binned x2 giving a total imaging time of 21 hours and 10 minutes over 8 nights between 27th August and 8th September 2021.  I used a Paramount MX mount, a QSI 690 CCD camera and Lodestar 2 guide camera.  Image capture was done with Maxim DL and I used CCD Stack2, Photoshop CS5 and Topaz Denoise AI for further processing.  Thanks for looking.

Tim C

NGC 6992 Eastern Veil Nebula BB NP101 QSI690 October 2021.jpg

JR

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Oct 28, 2021, 3:42:13 AM10/28/21
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Tim

That's a fantastic image.  It not only brings out the finer almost invisible structure but also there's a very strong impression of volume or shape in three dimensions.  It also shows what the benefits are of gathering as much data as possible, at just over 21 hours.  

The stars are very well done too.  Small and lots of colour.

Looking forward to your next image

regards

James

Sent from my iPad

On 26 Oct 2021, at 20:52, timc <tcos...@gmail.com> wrote:



Attached is an image of the eastern loop of the Veil Nebula (NGC 6992, Caldwell 33) in Cygnus.  The Veil Nebula is a vast cloud of heated ionised gas and dust formed from a supernova remnant which exploded between 10 and 20 thousand years ago.  The whole supernova remnant (of which this is just a part) measures about 3 degrees of sky (or roughly 6 Moon diameters).  I’ve previously imaged this part of the nebula using my Tak 85 telescope which gives a wider field of view.  For this image I used my Televue NP101is 4 inch refractor telescope which gives more of a close-up view.  This image consists of the following 300s sub-exposures: Lx68, Rx41, Gx40, Bx51 all unbinned and Hax54 binned x2 giving a total imaging time of 21 hours and 10 minutes over 8 nights between 27th August and 8th September 2021.  I used a Paramount MX mount, a QSI 690 CCD camera and Lodestar 2 guide camera.  Image capture was done with Maxim DL and I used CCD Stack2, Photoshop CS5 and Topaz Denoise AI for further processing.  Thanks for looking.

Tim C

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<NGC 6992 Eastern Veil Nebula BB NP101 QSI690 October 2021.jpg>

tcos...@gmail.com

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Oct 28, 2021, 4:25:07 AM10/28/21
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Thanks James. I’m glad at least one person liked it! It’s important to me to have feedback because whilst I may see an image in a certain way during production, other folks will have different views and impressions. So constructive feedback of whatever sort is always welcome.
KR
Tim

Sent from my iPhone

On 28 Oct 2021, at 08:42, 'JR' via croydonastro <croydo...@googlegroups.com> wrote:



William Bottaci

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Nov 4, 2021, 9:07:17 AM11/4/21
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Hello Tim, another great image; your walls must be covered in these display photographs.

I too thought, as soon as I saw it before reading anything, that it has depth so giving a 3-d impression. I think the blackness of the space helps, along with the structure that clearly isn't flat.
Perhaps for me, in a minority but shared with James, is how small the stars look. Stars in reality at this scale would be microscopic, but then we wouldn’t see them. In reality we see them because of their brightness but that is lost as soon as you display them on paper or on a screen - they then have to have a size.

I'm guessing that the field of view is about 1º by 1.3º with your setup, and with a pixel size of 3.7µm, from 540 mm then the smallest stars that I see are right up against being just 1 camera pixel in size; and even in the corners, though we should expect that with a flat Petzval image. You can't get smaller than that.

Two questions:
What app do you use for guiding?
How have you found the Topaz Denoise AI?

Thanks for sharing, William




On Thu, 28 Oct 2021 at 09:25, <tcos...@gmail.com> wrote:
Thanks James. I’m glad at least one person liked it! It’s important to me to have feedback because whilst I may see an image in a certain way during production, other folks will have different views and impressions. So constructive feedback of whatever sort is always welcome.
KR
Tim



On Thu, 28 Oct 2021 at 08:42, 'JR' via croydonastro <croydo...@googlegroups.com> wrote:
Tim
That's a fantastic image.  It not only brings out the finer almost invisible structure but also there's a very strong impression of volume or shape in three dimensions.  It also shows what the benefits are of gathering as much data as possible, at just over 21 hours.  

The stars are very well done too.  Small and lots of colour.

Looking forward to your next image
regards
James



On Tue, 26 Oct 2021 at 20:52, timc <tcos...@gmail.com> wrote:
Attached is an image of the eastern loop of the Veil Nebula (NGC 6992, Caldwell 33) in Cygnus.
The Veil Nebula is a vast cloud of heated ionised gas and dust formed from a supernova remnant which exploded between 10 and 20 thousand years ago. The whole supernova remnant (of which this is just a part) measures about 3 degrees of sky (or roughly 6 Moon diameters).
I’ve previously imaged this part of the nebula using my Tak 85 telescope which gives a wider field of view. For this image I used my Televue NP101is 4 inch refractor telescope which gives more of a close-up view.
This image consists of the following 300s sub-exposures:
L x68, R x41, G x40, B x51 all unbinned and Ha x54 binned x2 giving a total imaging time of 21 hours and 10 minutes over 8 nights between 27th August and 8th September 2021.

I used a Paramount MX mount, a QSI 690 CCD camera and Lodestar 2 guide camera.  Image capture was done with Maxim DL and I used CCD Stack2, Photoshop CS5 and Topaz Denoise AI for further processing
NGC 6992 Eastern Veil Nebula BB NP101 QSI690 October 2021.jpg

trevsie7

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Nov 4, 2021, 9:22:49 AM11/4/21
to 'J R' via croydonastro
Another excellent image Tim

On Tue, 26 Oct 2021 at 20:52, timc <tcos...@gmail.com> wrote:

Attached is an image of the eastern loop of the Veil Nebula (NGC 6992, Caldwell 33) in Cygnus.  The Veil Nebula is a vast cloud of heated ionised gas and dust formed from a supernova remnant which exploded between 10 and 20 thousand years ago.  The whole supernova remnant (of which this is just a part) measures about 3 degrees of sky (or roughly 6 Moon diameters).  I’ve previously imaged this part of the nebula using my Tak 85 telescope which gives a wider field of view.  For this image I used my Televue NP101is 4 inch refractor telescope which gives more of a close-up view.  This image consists of the following 300s sub-exposures: Lx68, Rx41, Gx40, Bx51 all unbinned and Hax54 binned x2 giving a total imaging time of 21 hours and 10 minutes over 8 nights between 27th August and 8th September 2021.  I used a Paramount MX mount, a QSI 690 CCD camera and Lodestar 2 guide camera.  Image capture was done with Maxim DL and I used CCD Stack2, Photoshop CS5 and Topaz Denoise AI for further processing.  Thanks for looking.

Tim C

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tcos...@gmail.com

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Nov 6, 2021, 12:52:20 PM11/6/21
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Hi William and Trev. Many thanks for your comments – much appreciated. @William you are very close with your estimate of the FOV with this set up. Re the stars, I did do some star reduction but only as much as needed to place them in the background and not overwhelm the nebula. Stars are relatively bright and nebulas are dim and this is a composition after all, so I wanted the nebula to stand out to increase the 3D depth of field effect.

Re guiding, I use Maxim DL for both image capture with the main CCD camera and guiding through the guide camera.  Both main CCD cameras I use (QSI 690 and Moravian G2 8300) have off-axis guider ports and the Lodestar 2 guide camera simply screws into the ports. I find this setup generally very reliable. Re Topaz De Noise, I only recently acquired this software, but first impressions are that it does an excellent job particularly on de-noising wispy cloudy features like nebulas. This helps to improve image quality and bring out features that were ‘hidden’ by noise. It is also easy to use and I have it set up as a plug-in for Photoshop CS5. A very useful tool in my opinion. Hope all this is helpful.

Tim C

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JR

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Nov 7, 2021, 4:55:10 AM11/7/21
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Hi Tim

Topaz denoise sounds intriguing. 

There is a well regarded third party freeware plugin for PI, EZ Processing Suite, doing several things, which includes a very good noise reduction process.   A comparison of different methods on the same data would be interesting if we could somehow organise it.

James


Sent from my iPad

On 6 Nov 2021, at 16:52, tcos...@gmail.com wrote:



William Bottaci

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Nov 11, 2021, 7:45:53 AM11/11/21
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Hello Tim
Yes, this answers the questions, thanks.

I thought to glean some expertise or trick with PHD2 guiding ... but you don't use it.

I've seen advertisements for Topaz DeNoise for many years, also SHARPEN projects 2 which seems a competing product and does the same thing.
Costs: Topaz DeNoise $79.99,  SHARPEN projects 2 £14.20 down from £49.
William




On Sat, 6 Nov 2021 at 16:52, <tcos...@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi William and Trev. Many thanks for your comments  much appreciated.
William you are very close with your estimate of the FOV with this set up. Re the stars, I did do some star reduction but only as much as needed to place them in the background and not overwhelm the nebula. Stars are relatively bright and nebulas are dim and this is a composition after all, so I wanted the nebula to stand out to increase the 3D depth of field effect.

Re guiding, I use Maxim DL for both image capture with the main CCD camera and guiding through the guide camera.  Both main CCD cameras I use (QSI 690 and Moravian G2 8300) have off-axis guider ports and the Lodestar 2 guide camera simply screws into the ports. I find this setup generally very reliable.
Re Topaz De Noise, I only recently acquired this software, but first impressions are that it does an excellent job particularly on de-noising wispy cloudy features like nebulas. This helps to improve image quality and bring out features that were ‘hidden’ by noise. It is also easy to use and I have it set up as a plug-in for Photoshop CS5. A very useful tool in my opinion. Hope all this is helpful.
Tim C



On Thu, 4 Nov 2021 at 13:22, trevsie7 <trevs...@gmail.com> wrote:
Another excellent image Tim



On Thu, 4 Nov 2021 at 13:06, William Bottaci <w.bo...@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello Tim, another great image; your walls must be covered in these display photographs.

I too thought, as soon as I saw it before reading anything, that it has depth so giving a 3-d impression. I think the blackness of the space helps, along with the structure that clearly isn't flat.
Perhaps for me, in a minority but shared with James, is how small the stars look. Stars in reality at this scale would be microscopic, but then we wouldn’t see them. In reality we see them because of their brightness but that is lost as soon as you display them on paper or on a screen - they then have to have a size.

I'm guessing that the field of view is about 1º by 1.3º with your setup, and with a pixel size of 3.7µm, from 540 mm then the smallest stars that I see are right up against being just 1 camera pixel in size; and even in the corners, though we should expect that with a flat Petzval image. You can't get smaller than that.

Two questions:
 - What app do you use for guiding?
 - How have you found the Topaz Denoise AI?

Thanks for sharing, William



2021-11-04

Hello Tim, another great image; your walls must be covered in these display photographs.

I too thought, as soon as I saw it before reading anything, that it has depth so giving a 3-d impression. I think the blackness of the space helps, along with the structure that clearly isn't flat.
Perhaps for me, in a minority but shared with James, is how small the stars look. Stars in reality at this scale would be microscopic, but then we wouldn’t see them. In reality we see them because of their brightness but that is lost as soon as you display them on paper or on a screen - they then have to have a size.

I'm guessing that the field of view is about 1º by 1.3º with your setup, and with a pixel size of 3.7µm, from 540 mm then the smallest stars that I see are right up against being just 1 camera pixel in size; and even in the corners, though we should expect that with a flat Petzval image. You can't get smaller than that.

Two questions:
What app do you use for guiding?
How have you found the Topaz Denoise AI?

Thanks for sharing, William



On Thu, 28 Oct 2021 at 09:25, <tcos...@gmail.com> wrote:
Thanks James. I’m glad at least one person liked it! It’s important to me to have feedback because whilst I may see an image in a certain way during production, other folks will have different views and impressions. So constructive feedback of whatever sort is always welcome.
KR
Tim



On Thu, 28 Oct 2021 at 08:42, 'JR' via croydonastro <croydo...@googlegroups.com> wrote:
Tim
That's a fantastic image.  It not only brings out the finer almost invisible structure but also there's a very strong impression of volume or shape in three dimensions.  It also shows what the benefits are of gathering as much data as possible, at just over 21 hours.  

The stars are very well done too.  Small and lots of colour.

Looking forward to your next image
regards
James



On Tue, 26 Oct 2021 at 20:52, timc <tcos...@gmail.com> wrote:
Attached is an image of the eastern loop of the Veil Nebula (NGC 6992, Caldwell 33) in Cygnus.
The Veil Nebula is a vast cloud of heated ionised gas and dust formed from a supernova remnant which exploded between 10 and 20 thousand years ago. The whole supernova remnant (of which this is just a part) measures about 3 degrees of sky (or roughly 6 Moon diameters).
I’ve previously imaged this part of the nebula using my Tak 85 telescope which gives a wider field of view. For this image I used my Televue NP101is 4 inch refractor telescope which gives more of a close-up view.
This image consists of the following 300s sub-exposures:
L x68, R x41, G x40, B x51 all unbinned and Ha x54 binned x2 giving a total imaging time of 21 hours and 10 minutes over 8 nights between 27th August and 8th September 2021.

I used a Paramount MX mount, a QSI 690 CCD camera and Lodestar 2 guide camera.  Image capture was done with Maxim DL and I used CCD Stack2, Photoshop CS5 and Topaz Denoise AI for further processing
NGC 6992 Eastern Veil Nebula BB NP101 QSI690 October 2021.jpg
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