Oracle, Solaris, Sparc and Linux

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Rick Smith

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Apr 17, 2011, 7:26:35 PM4/17/11
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I am a Solaris admin who was at an interview recently. I was told in
the
interview that they were a Sun shop but moving to Linux because of
Oracle's
buyout of Sun, that Oracle would destroy Solaris and the hardware
aspects
too.


Any comments are welcome.

ji...@specsol.spam.sux.com

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Apr 17, 2011, 8:08:15 PM4/17/11
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Oracle owns Oracle.

Oracle owns Sun.

So you think maybe Oracle's emphaisis will be on Oracle running on a bunch
of other companies Linux distros?

--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.

Richard B. Gilbert

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Apr 17, 2011, 8:21:00 PM4/17/11
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The reaction seems to be extreme!

If what you have works, use it. If not, and the vendor won't fix it,
THEN think about Linux.

Cydrome Leader

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Apr 18, 2011, 1:41:47 AM4/18/11
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oracle sucks.

linux sucks more.


Ian Collins

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Apr 18, 2011, 1:46:04 AM4/18/11
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Common ground at last!

--
Ian Collins

Thad Floryan

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Apr 18, 2011, 2:57:21 AM4/18/11
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Oracle does have its own variant of Linux:

<http://oracle.com/Store/> to buy support for it

Other relevant pages here:

<http://www.oracle.com/us/technologies/linux/index.html>
<https://edelivery.oracle.com/linux>
<http://www.oracle.com/us/technologies/linux/025994.htm>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Linux>

And before dissing Linux outright, be aware that much of the USA's
critical government infrastructure is running on Linux and hardened
by the NSA:

<http://www.nsa.gov/ia/_files/os/redhat/rhel5-guide-i731.pdf>
<http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/index.shtml>

FWIW, the rhel5-guide-i731.pdf is dated 28-FEB-2011.

Colin B.

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Apr 18, 2011, 10:33:15 AM4/18/11
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True, but there are a large range of definitions of "works."
When the vendor pulls back support and charges you six times as much money
for it, then it may be time to think about Linux.

(hint: it is)

Colin

John D Groenveld

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Apr 18, 2011, 11:00:52 AM4/18/11
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In article <235d61ad-c465-4b78...@d27g2000vbz.googlegroups.com>,

Rick Smith <ricksmit...@gmail.com> wrote:
>I am a Solaris admin who was at an interview recently. I was told in
>the
>interview that they were a Sun shop but moving to Linux because of
>Oracle's
>buyout of Sun, that Oracle would destroy Solaris and the hardware
>aspects
>too.

What industry?
What size organization?
What applications?
To which Linux are they migrating?
To what hardware?
What would your role be?
Did you get the offer?
And if so, did you accept?

Good luck,
John
groe...@acm.org

Rick Smith

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Apr 20, 2011, 7:31:16 PM4/20/11
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On Apr 18, 10:00 am, groen...@cse.psu.edu (John D Groenveld) wrote:
> In article <235d61ad-c465-4b78-b66d-895746ba6...@d27g2000vbz.googlegroups.com>,

> Rick Smith <ricksmith.use...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >I am a Solaris admin who was at an interview recently. I was told in
> >the
> >interview that they were a Sun shop but moving to Linux because of
> >Oracle's
> >buyout of Sun, that Oracle would destroy Solaris and the hardware
> >aspects
> >too.
>
> What industry?
> What size organization?
> What applications?
> To which Linux are they migrating?
> To what hardware?
> What would your role be?
> Did you get the offer?
> And if so, did you accept?
>
> Good luck,
> John
> groenv...@acm.org

I posted this query on the sunmanagers mailing list and received the
following responses, I hope someone at Sun takes note - identity of
responders has been removed due to privacy concerns and
professionalism.


Original post:

> I am a Solaris admin who was at an interview recently. I was told in the
> interview that they were a Sun shop but moving to Linux because of Oracle's
> buyout of Sun, that Oracle would destroy Solaris and the hardware aspects
> too.
>
>

> Any comments are welcome.

Responses:

I work as a sys admin at a small University. The change in OS patch
update
access is the main issue damaging our view of running Solaris in the
long term.
We do pay something for Redhat or Windows access to software updates,
but the fees for Oracle's Solaris updates are priced out of reach for
us.

We are actively working to migrate anything we can off Solaris ASAP,
simply due to the annual costs running 2000% that of licensing Redhat
(for
educational institutions).

Many are predicting there will be only Fortune 500 companies and
government running Solaris in the near future. Perhaps Oracle likes
it that way.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


We were and are heavily invested in to SUN/Orcle. As you University
our budget as you can guess is very tight. With current actions by
Oracle in regard to their lack of discounts(for education sites) and
new pricing for support,there is a major push to move to VMWARE and to
the Linux environment. I wish the best of luck in you interview.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I don't blame them. Oracle has ruined the service of Sun completely.
I'm a long time Sun admin, and currently sitting on a 100% Sun
environment. I look at the RedHat and Windows Admins on a regular
basis, with an odd envy I've never felt before.

Best of luck...


I'll avoid being 'political' about the whole thing and just mention
what I've noticed:

1. As a paying customer, getting patches is painful. The new Oracle
"support" site really just drives me batty trying to find things.

2. Their tech support, either people or procedures, seems to be
operating on a philopsophy of "we get to it when we get to it."
This applies to Gold and Platinum level support with 4 hour windows
and Priority 1 (i.e. it's really broken and smoke is coming out
of the rack/$boss's ears) tickets.

3. I suspect several more layers of bureaucracy have been installed
between frontline & backline techs and between those techs and
managers capable of lighting fires.

4. A recent professional services engagement has left us with
lighter wallets and a solution that can't do what Oracle claimed
it would. This is really leaving a bad taste here.

So yes, there have been talks around $work about ditching Oracle/
Solaris and moving to some Linux variant or another. We're feeling we
can no longer justify the cost and declining value for our money.
While we have not moved wholesale on this idea, we have opted in the
last 6 months to change platforms from Oracle/Solaris to Dell/RHEL for
3 new projects.

YMMV, just a datapoint.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Just ONE ridiculous thing that Oracle told us as a requirement to get
support for our Sun platforms.

At OUR expense, we have to hire an Oracle pro-serv consultant
(mandatory) to do the following.

Down EVERY ONE of our production servers, one by one, to run some
bootable diagnostics system they have.

We have over 1k servers on Sun/Solaris in production alone.

We have to pay for this guy the entire cycle until this is completed.

Even if I was willing to down all my production servers, the
maintenance window constraints for this work would take literally many
months to complete this task.

THEN this doesn't ensure you get support.

They had the nerve to say they then have to evaluate the results to
decide what your rate would be and IF they would accept you for
support.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I've made my living supporting primarily Sun/Solaris for 12yrs now. I
now consider myself primarily a linux enterprise architect and we have
migrated about 200 Sun boxes to linux at this point with only 1k more
to go before we eliminate the Oracle Virus from our networks.

Oracle killed Sun.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I used to work for Sun. I quit Oracle after the takeover and now I'm
helping companies migrate from Solaris to Linux. I agree with your
interviewer 100%.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Where i work we're actively moving from Solaris/Sparc into Linux/
VMware and have been doing so for the past year. We've been talking
about doing this for the past few years, even before the buyout.
Sparc HW is just too pricey per cycle when compared to intel. If
you're a top tier company whose app can only scale vertically, then
it's different. But most of my servers don't require much resources
(nothing over 12 cpu per server, and 99% only need 1-4 cpu (and only
at peak times)). For us, virtualization makes the most sense and
VMware has the best support. LDOMS are nice, but how to hot-migrate?
Where to find the 3rd party integrated services (e.g. backup,
mirroring, etc)? How to consolidate Win* into those servers? VMware
provides so many nice features for the small- and middle- class
users. And it's all in one pane (yes, having your Windows Admins
interact with your nix admins is a Good Thing).

Some pricing comments:
- our last server purchase, we redid our entire vmware clusters for
what 1
Sparc DB server would have cost us.

- our last storage purchase, we saved about %50 going HDS instead of
Oracle storage.

- our yearly HW/SW service costs are also decreasing as a result of
the
move, and this includes paying RedHat for support.

Perhaps more importantly, after moving one of our Mission Critical
apps from T-series to intel/vmware, we're seeing over 2x startup times
improvement (this May will tell how much more repsonsive it is under
actual load). And other things are faster too; compiling code is
amazingly faster - no time to go get coffee waiting for the compile to
finish.
But the Oracle vendors tell us vmware overhead makes things slow...

Our BC/DR plan gets totally revamped with better responsiveness, and
our planned outages are more avoidable as we hot migrate servers from
one location to another. I haven't experienced this yet, but in
theory new personnel should pick up our setups faster as linux is more
accessible than Solaris and so people should have more experience with
it.


There are downsides. I miss a lot of my Solaris commands; p-this and
p-that, dtrace, truss - there are some equivalents in linux but not
the same. I miss zfs. And Sparc HW and Solaris are rock-solid.
But i don't miss custom compiling issues (LD what? PIC huh?), the tar/
gtar or grep/ggrep/gegrep, SYSV vs GNU funkiness found on Solaris.


Pretty much how I feel. My clients are really unhappy with Oracle's
buyout as well. While my major client gets excellent Sun hardware
support from IBM Global Services, the times they have to interact with
Oracle for software or purchasing are a nightmare.

My personal opinion is Oracle bought Sun so they could sell a database
"appliance" with Oracle badged servers, storage,.... Anything else
Sun was doing that is not part of the DB appliance path doesn't look
like it has a future.

Cheers,
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

My shop has been running from Solaris on SPARC to Red Hat Enterprise
Linux (RHEL) since the buy-out. I think we're down to 3 Suns remaining
for decommissioning, when the last apps migrate to linux.
I was hired in November 2008 for my Sun/AIX experience, but I'm now on
the forefront of RHEL on VMware in my shop.
We use IBM intel-based x3850 hosts for VMware and a few unvirtualized
systems (i.e. database) where we need the full processor complement
and
128GB of RAM.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Larry has said that he doesn't want to be in the "low end" hardware
business, but it's not clear what exactly that means. To me that
would mean the X2??? series, which I wouldn't miss. They did come out
with the x4170m2 / x4270m2 after the acquisition, which is a good
sign, but what the future will hold isn't clear. Certainly Oracle's
policies wrt VAR's, discounts, and quoting have made it harder to buy
Soracle hardware, and more than one VAR has given up. A while back I
asked on this list for referrals to *anyone* capable of quoting on the
x4270m2 and was eventually steered toward *one* vendor who could turn
around quotes in less than ten days, with customary discount levels.
That situation may have improved somewhat since then, but it's still
way more of a hassle than it used to be.

Clearly the CMT SPARC systems fit someone's needs, since they keep
putting them out, but we don't have any -- multiple weak cores don't
match any of our needs, and we're steadily decommissioning our
domestic SPARC hosts, which are mainly v240 / v210 - class. I've yet
to find an alternate x64 system that isn't ... painful. I demoed one
from HP, which was both a physical and management nightmare. Out of
the box, the serial console is useless, and HP's support delivers
conflicting information depending on who you happen to get. It's
clear, though, that one has to plug in a keyboard and monitor to get
into the BIOS to enable the limited serial console at all, a task that
isn't particularly feasible when you're on the other side of both an
ocean and a language barrier from the hardware. It's all about
network consoles these days, which is fine so long as you can get a
working network link and happen to have a DHCP server on each and
every subnet -- which isn't feasible for us.

Oracle's release of Solaris 11 Express could be seen as encouraging
wrt the future of Solaris, but Oracle does seem to mainly see systems
as a place for their DB to run, so some expect future development to
align with that idea.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
We've started looking to RHEL both because of user pressure, and
because of FUD regarding the future. So far I'm not impressed. The
software reflects the balkanization of the Linux community as a whole
-- multiple choices for a given need, none of which really measure
up. For example, mirroring / striping can be done with MV, or LVM.
Each has functionality that's limited, eg. for a two-disk mirror, LVM
wants a *third* disk as a log device, and from what I read, doesn't
read from both sides of a mirror -- and it's not clear to me if one
can mirror the boot volume in a supported fashion, or during an
automated kickstart install. Maybe they expect one to use hardware
RAID on an HBA, but I want nothing to do with that -- you're dependent
on that particular card for your setup, and if it does, you're screwed
unless you can still source an identical card, and maybe even if you
can. There's also no way to monitor HBA RAID for failures.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

My personal opinion which is not necessarily the opinion of the
company I work for ...
Oracle likely will kill Solaris by over charging for support, having
slow response to support calls and neglecting development of Solaris.
Two out of three I've already seen.

I know both Solaris and Linux and like Solaris on Sparc better for
servers.
I personally have changed from primarily Solaris support to primarily
Linux support.

I also expect my company will be moving more of their unix to Linux.

hume.sp...@bofh.ca

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Apr 20, 2011, 8:28:53 PM4/20/11
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Rick Smith <ricksmit...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I posted this query on the sunmanagers mailing list and received the
> following responses, I hope someone at Sun takes note - identity of

There's not a single thing in this post that everyone in this group doesn't
already know, and not a single person on this group that can do anything at
all about it.

Sun can't "take note" because they no longer exist.

Oracle doesn't listen to their own employees, much less some unidentifiable
nubs on a newsgroup.

What are you trying to accomplish, beyond rubbing salt on the wounds?

--
Brandon Hume - hume -> BOFH.Ca, http://WWW.BOFH.Ca/

John D Groenveld

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Apr 20, 2011, 9:58:26 PM4/20/11
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In article <e6e2810b-3b21-42a5...@l2g2000prg.googlegroups.com>,

Rick Smith <ricksmit...@gmail.com> wrote:
>I posted this query on the sunmanagers mailing list and received the
>following responses, I hope someone at Sun takes note - identity of
>responders has been removed due to privacy concerns and
>professionalism.

Why do you hope someone at Sun takes note?

In addition to my previous unanswered questions, what did your
prospective employer consider as barriers to exit their Solaris
systems and their barriers to entry for Linux?

John
groe...@acm.org

David Kirkby

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Apr 21, 2011, 5:29:22 AM4/21/11
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Oracle pushing up support costs so much seems to be putting a lot of
companies off of Solaris and forcing them in the Linux direction. I
don't really know what Oracle intends to do with Solaris, but they
seem to be running it into the ground, though they are still putting a
lot of manpower into developing it.

hume.sp...@bofh.ca

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Apr 21, 2011, 6:09:50 AM4/21/11
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David Kirkby <drki...@gmail.com> wrote:
> companies off of Solaris and forcing them in the Linux direction. I
> don't really know what Oracle intends to do with Solaris, but they

I'd imagine they see it as the base for a database appliance. "Pay us the
money, here's the box, now put your goddamned hands in your pockets and don't
touch."

Solaris will probably end up being the iOS of the database market. We'll
see... maybe in ten years, the posts on this group will be questions on "how
do I jailbreak my Exadata?"

John D Groenveld

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Apr 21, 2011, 9:09:55 AM4/21/11
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In article <ioovpe$t2s$1...@Kil-nws-1.UCIS.Dal.Ca>,

<hume.sp...@bofh.ca> wrote:
>I'd imagine they see it as the base for a database appliance. "Pay us the
>money, here's the box, now put your goddamned hands in your pockets and don't
>touch."
>
>Solaris will probably end up being the iOS of the database market. We'll
>see... maybe in ten years, the posts on this group will be questions on "how
>do I jailbreak my Exadata?"

If you're so closely wedded to Larry Ellison and company that you've
leased his Ed Zander-esque low-volume, high-margin appliances then
you don't think of trying to jailbreak his Exadata.

John
groe...@acm.org

hume.sp...@bofh.ca

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Apr 21, 2011, 10:07:56 AM4/21/11
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John D Groenveld <groe...@cse.psu.edu> wrote:
> If you're so closely wedded to Larry Ellison and company that you've
> leased his Ed Zander-esque low-volume, high-margin appliances then
> you don't think of trying to jailbreak his Exadata.

Well, if you're going to shoot for Apple-style terms of ownership, then
you're not leasing. You've bought it, and it's yours (as are the problems
of upgrading and disposal), you're just *treated* like a renter.

The people buying the Ebay castoffs would be the jailbreakers, kind of like
how the iPhone is now.

I'm being facetious, but I can see that being the holy grail for any
company (and software companies have been shooting for software-as-service
for years now). Apple's certainly making it work. And, oddly, I can see
the value of a self-contained database appliance that Just Works.

Where my cynical conspiracy theory falls apart is that the kind of company
that would get the most value out of such a device is NOT the high-margin,
well-staffed megacorp that is Oracle's (only?) interest.

Rick Smith

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Apr 21, 2011, 11:02:19 AM4/21/11
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On Apr 21, 9:07 am, hume.spamfil...@bofh.ca wrote:

Both Intel and Microsoft have proven that low margin high volume
actually works, why would Oracle give up this lucrative market to
Linux is beyond me - Solaris x86 probably requires just a little work
to make it more lucrative than Linux - unless it is already so.

That apart - I answered John's question directly to him - maybe they
are in his spam folder or his email per google groups is invalid. Also
to answer Brandon - I was unaware of Oracle's policies hence to share
knowledge I pasted the sun managers responses.

John D Groenveld

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Apr 21, 2011, 11:31:11 AM4/21/11
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In article <iopdns$68e$1...@Kil-nws-1.UCIS.Dal.Ca>,

<hume.sp...@bofh.ca> wrote:
>I'm being facetious, but I can see that being the holy grail for any
>company (and software companies have been shooting for software-as-service
>for years now). Apple's certainly making it work. And, oddly, I can see
>the value of a self-contained database appliance that Just Works.

I believe Sun used to resell the database portion of Oracle's
stack as part of "database packs" systems.

>Where my cynical conspiracy theory falls apart is that the kind of company
>that would get the most value out of such a device is NOT the high-margin,
>well-staffed megacorp that is Oracle's (only?) interest.

CIOs at Fortune 50, 500, 5000 companies are easier targets for
Keith Block and company's sales critters for their high-margin,
low-volume appliance systems.


BTW here's Barbara Darrow on Larry Ellison reconsidering the
Ed Zander business model:
<URL:http://searchdatacenter.techtarget.com/news/2240034943/Oracle-We-have-a-hardware-problem>
| This bread-and-butter part of the server market was spurned by
| Oracle's CEO Larry Ellison early last year when Oracle completed its
| $7.4 billion buyout of Sun. At the January 2010 press conference
| outlining Oracle's Sun plans, Ellison and then-president Charles
| Phillips said the company would cede the x86 'commodity server'
| market to competitors like Dell. Instead, it would focus on
| Ellison's much-touted high-margin, high-priced Exadata and Exalogic
| data center appliances that run a full complement of Oracle
| software. List prices for those appliances start at $300,000 for a
| quarter-rack Exadata, not including software, support or
| maintenance, and range up to $1.5 million for a full-rack of
| hardware only, according to the Oracle Exadata/Exalogic price list.

John
groe...@acm.org

John D Groenveld

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Apr 21, 2011, 11:35:20 AM4/21/11
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In article <f1f3f81c-3386-409c...@v31g2000vbs.googlegroups.com>,

Rick Smith <ricksmit...@gmail.com> wrote:
>That apart - I answered John's question directly to him - maybe they
>are in his spam folder or his email per google groups is invalid. Also

I haven't seen it.
Why don't you post your response here?

Also, regarding your role with your prospective new employer,
will you only be dealing with the legacy Solaris systems or
will you migrate to Linux as well?

John
groe...@acm.org

Rick Smith

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Apr 21, 2011, 11:58:20 AM4/21/11
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On Apr 21, 10:35 am, groen...@cse.psu.edu (John D Groenveld) wrote:
> In article <f1f3f81c-3386-409c-aee9-90ba28a72...@v31g2000vbs.googlegroups.com>,

> Rick Smith <ricksmith.use...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >That apart - I answered John's question directly to him - maybe they
> >are in his spam folder or his email per google groups is invalid. Also
>
> I haven't seen it.
> Why don't you post your response here?
>
> Also, regarding your role with your prospective new employer,
> will you only be dealing with the legacy Solaris systems or
> will you migrate to Linux as well?
>
> John
> groenv...@acm.org

What industry? Edu - it's a university with 12,000 students and 2000
staff. Students email will be migrated to gmail
What size organization?
What applications? ERP banner, student web pages, email, Sun
messaging, Netbackup
To which Linux are they migrating? I believe it will be RHEL - not
sure
To what hardware? maybe HP - not sure
What would your role be? not sure
Did you get the offer? have not heard from them


And if so, did you accept?

Will I be migrating to Linux - I certainly hope so, but I don't know.
I was not given much information, your questions are good and I wish I
had asked them.

Good luck,

John D Groenveld

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Apr 21, 2011, 1:00:19 PM4/21/11
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In article <6475109e-9c44-44dd...@q12g2000prb.googlegroups.com>,

Rick Smith <ricksmit...@gmail.com> wrote:
>What applications? ERP banner, student web pages, email, Sun
>messaging, Netbackup

Oracle's ERP guys have been hawking their cluster solution
for Linux on Dell as legacy (IBM, HPQ, Sun) system killers
for a while now.

I haven't been tracking Oracle's decisions regarding the
Sun collaboration and messaging suite.
<URL:http://www.oracle.com/us/sun/sun-products-map-075562.html>
Tom Kurian and company already offered those parts of the
stack before the deal of the century.


>To which Linux are they migrating? I believe it will be RHEL - not
>sure

Redhat has a generous campus discount program for RHEL update
subscriptions.
I haven't priced full support in a while.
Penn State runs an update mirror to which up2date(1M) is bound.

>To what hardware? maybe HP - not sure

I haven't seen HPQ's pitch to .EDU in years but their ProLiant
machines would probably sell better in my little corner if they
had an on-site campus rep and e-Commerce store like Dell's.
Keith Block and company's Shop.Sun.COM is undergoing renovation.

>What would your role be? not sure
>Did you get the offer? have not heard from them
>And if so, did you accept?

Good luck.

>Will I be migrating to Linux - I certainly hope so, but I don't know.
>I was not given much information, your questions are good and I wish I
>had asked them.

RedHat's marketing wonks has some literature for you:
<URL:http://www.redhat.com/migrate/solaris_to_linux/>

John
groe...@acm.org

Rick Smith

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Apr 21, 2011, 1:27:05 PM4/21/11
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On Apr 21, 12:00 pm, groen...@cse.psu.edu (John D Groenveld) wrote:
> In article <6475109e-9c44-44dd-ad33-c95c32683...@q12g2000prb.googlegroups.com>,
> groenv...@acm.org

Now I remember, I did ask what I would be working on, they said: DNS,
DHCP, web pages etc

hume.sp...@bofh.ca

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Apr 21, 2011, 1:40:20 PM4/21/11
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Rick Smith <ricksmit...@gmail.com> wrote:
> To which Linux are they migrating? I believe it will be RHEL - not
> sure

I would keep an eye on Illumos, Nexenta, and OpenIndiana... the future of
Solaris as a general computing platform is in their hands, I would wager.

John D Groenveld

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Apr 21, 2011, 2:14:41 PM4/21/11
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In article <0c093981-3969-4d66...@q40g2000prh.googlegroups.com>,

Rick Smith <ricksmit...@gmail.com> wrote:
>Now I remember, I did ask what I would be working on, they said: DNS,
>DHCP, web pages etc

I woud guess you'll take some performance hit when moving from
Solaris to RHEL for those applications but that may not be a huge
barrier to exit even if your organization's specific benchmarks
show it.

John
groe...@acm.org

Ian Collins

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Apr 21, 2011, 4:41:19 PM4/21/11
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I'd be interesting in knowing if I can jailbreak a 7210 and turn it back
into an x4540!!

--
Ian Collins

Simon Parker

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Apr 22, 2011, 4:22:19 PM4/22/11
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On Apr 21, 9:41 pm, Ian Collins <ian-n...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> On 04/21/11 10:09 PM, hume.spamfil...@bofh.ca wrote:
>
> > David Kirkby<drkir...@gmail.com>  wrote:

As a former tech support employee at Sun I've found it difficult to
get any sort of Solaris related work.
I've been for a few interviews but most places seem to be migrating to
Linux on value for money grounds.
I think Oracle has an important legacy customer base on Solaris and
just wanted to manage the graceful decline as Sun went down the pan.
Linux development effort is always going to be so much cheaper at the
end of the day

Simon

bits45

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Apr 29, 2011, 1:07:54 AM4/29/11
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On Apr 18, 2:57 am, Thad Floryan <t...@thadlabs.com> wrote:
> On 4/17/2011 5:21 PM, Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
>
> > On 4/17/2011 7:26 PM, Rick Smith wrote:
> >> I am a Solaris admin who was at an interview recently. I was told in
> >> the
> >> interview that they were a Sun shop but moving to Linux because of
> >> Oracle's
> >> buyout of Sun, that Oracle would destroy Solaris and the hardware
> >> aspects
> >> too.
> >> Any comments are welcome.
>
> > The reaction seems to be extreme!
>
> > If what you have works, use it.  If not, and the vendor won't fix it,
> > THEN think about Linux.
>
> Oracle does have its own variant of Linux:
>
>     <http://oracle.com/Store/> to buy support for it
>
> Other relevant pages here:
>
>     <http://www.oracle.com/us/technologies/linux/index.html>
>     <https://edelivery.oracle.com/linux>
>     <http://www.oracle.com/us/technologies/linux/025994.htm>
>     <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Linux>
>
> And before dissing Linux outright, be aware that much of the USA's
> critical government infrastructure is running on Linux and hardened
> by the NSA:
>

Then we're doomed! :-)

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