Best color?

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Snyder brian scott

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Nov 11, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/11/97
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Hey all, after staring at computers all day long, my eyes get really
tired. I'm wondering if any one might have some color schemes that are
easy on the eyes.. Right now I use a light yellow background with black
text and a black cursor. For 'special shells' I use blue background
/white foreground / red cursor.. anyone have a favorite sheme out there??


brian


ps. One more ksh related question... i have a very long PS1 string
because I write to the xterm title in it, this gets very annoying because
commands that aren't so long will still get scrolled away, because it
thinks my PS1 is alonger length than is actually displayed in my prompt
string, does anyone know how to turn the scrolling off and/or change the
length it thinks PS1 is?

John Strange

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Nov 11, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/11/97
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try
xterm -fg Black -bg wheat


Snyder brian scott (bsn...@aplcenMP.apl.jhu.edu) wrote:
: Hey all, after staring at computers all day long, my eyes get really


: brian

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This posting represents the personal opinions of the author. It is not the
official opinion or policy of the author's employer. Warranty expired when you
opened this article and I will not be responsible for its contents or use.

Christian Weisgerber

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Nov 12, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/12/97
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In article <Pine.SOL.3.91.97111...@aplcenMP.apl.jhu.edu>,

Snyder brian scott <bsn...@aplcenMP.apl.jhu.edu> wrote:

> Hey all, after staring at computers all day long, my eyes get really
> tired.

- screen flicker
- bad monitor focus and convergence (a problem of all color monitors)
- screen fonts that are too small, a typical problem of working with
xterms under X

> I'm wondering if any one might have some color schemes that are
> easy on the eyes.

This is strictly a matter of personal preference.

> ps. One more ksh related question... i have a very long PS1 string
> because I write to the xterm title in it, this gets very annoying because
> commands that aren't so long will still get scrolled away, because it
> thinks my PS1 is alonger length than is actually displayed in my prompt
> string, does anyone know how to turn the scrolling off and/or change the
> length it thinks PS1 is?

Yep, you need to delimit the unprintable control sequences. There's an
undocumented way to do this in ksh. Start the prompt with any <character>
followed by \r. You can then bracket control sequences with <character>
and ksh will ignore them when calculating the length of the expanded
prompt.

Example:
You want a prompt consisting of the current working directory in
standout mode.

SMSO=$(tput smso) # standout on
RMSO=$(tput rmso) # standout off
D=$(print \\001) # ^A as delimiter
CR=$(print \\r)
PS1="${D}${CR}${D}${SMSO}${D}\$PWD${D}${RMSO}${D} "
# delim \r [ control ] text [ control ]

--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber na...@mips.rhein-neckar.de
See another pointless homepage at <URL:http://home.pages.de/~naddy/>.

Cole

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Nov 12, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/12/97
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Christian Weisgerber wrote:

> > I'm wondering if any one might have some color schemes that are
> > easy on the eyes.

Keeping in mind that I may very well be speaking directly out of my ass (in
other words, take this with several grains of salt), wouldn't it make sense
that since black is the "absence" of light, that it would be much easier on
your eyes to have a black background (which is the majority of the color
displayed) while varying the fg color rather than the other way around?

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test

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Nov 12, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/12/97
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Snyder brian scott wrote:
>
> Hey all, after staring at computers all day long, my eyes get really
> tired. I'm wondering if any one might have some color schemes that are

> easy on the eyes.. Right now I use a light yellow background with black
> text and a black cursor. For 'special shells' I use blue background
> /white foreground / red cursor.. anyone have a favorite sheme out there??
>
> brian
>
> ps. One more ksh related question... i have a very long PS1 string
> because I write to the xterm title in it, this gets very annoying because
> commands that aren't so long will still get scrolled away, because it
> thinks my PS1 is alonger length than is actually displayed in my prompt
> string, does anyone know how to turn the scrolling off and/or change the
> length it thinks PS1 is?

Supposedly green on black is the most "comfortable" color scheme, i.e.
the easiest on the eyes resulting in less eye strain. However, I use
blue on gray because I like to have a background color, and gray is the
least bright, IMO.

For your prompt, add a control-J at the end of the prompt string which
will drop the cursor to the next line.
--
Mark Greene My real address: mailto:gree...@hlthsrc.com
The above opinions are mine, not my employer's.

William Bailer

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Nov 15, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/15/97
to Cole

On Wed, 12 Nov 1997, Cole wrote:

>
>
>Christian Weisgerber wrote:
>
>> > I'm wondering if any one might have some color schemes that are

>> > easy on the eyes.
>
>Keeping in mind that I may very well be speaking directly out of my ass (in
>other words, take this with several grains of salt), wouldn't it make sense
>that since black is the "absence" of light, that it would be much easier on
>your eyes to have a black background (which is the majority of the color
>displayed) while varying the fg color rather than the other way around?
>

Christian,

People in many fields have done research on this question, including
perception, advertising, education, and military. Their priorities
differ, but results are about the same in all fields. For speed of
reading and comprehension, as a general concensus that I have collected
over the years, the following are best (nuber one being best):

1. Black on Light Yellow
2. Black on White (slightly greyed)
3. Black on Light Blue
4. White on Medium Blue

Those are the clear winners. White on black ranks very low.
Any combination with colored foreground ranks at the bottom.

To increase your faith in this information, think about the following:

1. Legal pads are yellow, and black ink is usually used on them.

2. The default background for word processors is usually white on blue.

3. Do you want to be distracted by color when your objective is to
absorb content?

4. 99% of all printed matter is black on white.

5. Color has a "burn-in" effect on the eye, causing an after image of
the complimentary color. This effect will drive you buggy. The worst
case is when the two colrs ARE complimentary colors, and the after
images are reversals of each other. You may have seen this on a web
page or bbs -- I can read about two pages of it and I am ready for the
mad house. In pop art, it was called a "psychedelic effect."

6. A black background means that most of the screen is always black, and
the overall brightness is much darker than the rest of the room that you
are in. The eyes tend to adjust to this by dilating, and then when you
look away from the screen, they constrict again --- your iris muscles
get overworked resulting in fatique or a "stinging" feeling in the front
of your eye. It is best that the averagebrightness of the screen be
near that of the area around the monitor.

Don't try to judge optimal background by just fiddling. Try this:

With your room lighting set to what is usual, grab a stack of about 20
sheets of normal copier or printer paper (or back 3 or 4 sheets with
something opaque) and cover part of your monitor screen. Then stare at
the border between the paper and the monitor background and adjust the
brightness until they look the same. You may have to adjust the
contrast too, to keep black just barely black.

You may be surprised to see that what looks white on paper looks a bit
grey on the screen, but THAT will be easier on your eyes than the usual
bright white. If that throws off other forms of display, then redefine
the background white as a light grey if you can. That goes for color
backgrounds too -- make them as bright as the white paper.

On most color monitors there is another disadvantage to using pure
colors other than yellow. Red, green, or blue will yield only one set
of color dots on the screen (not pixels, but the actual physical dots on
the monitor screen), which results in a less solid appearance. Yellow
is a good balance of all green and red dots. White is a balance of all
dots. Other combinations result in colors that don't work well --
colors that do not have the most common names. Incidentally, as you
darken yellow, it begins to appear brown, because they are actually the
same hue. Yellow is just the common name for "bright brown."

I have no idea why White on Blue works so well -- maybe because of our
extreme familiarity or evolved adaption to the appearance of clouds in
the sky?

Personally, I prefer Black on Yellow on a monitor when the yellow
brightness can be defined prcisely enough, otherwise I use Black on
White (actually light grey).

I am very interested to here any other knowledge, personal experience,
or opinions relating to this subject.

Bill Bailer
wba...@cris.com, Rochester NY USA, tel:716-473-9556
Acoustics, piano technology, music theory, JSBach


Tony Porczyk

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Nov 15, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/15/97
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William Bailer <Wba...@cris.com> writes:

> Christian Weisgerber wrote:
>> I'm wondering if any one might have some color schemes that are
>> easy on the eyes.

> [...]


> 1. Black on Light Yellow

> [...]


> Those are the clear winners. White on black ranks very low.
> Any combination with colored foreground ranks at the bottom.

> [...]


> I am very interested to here any other knowledge, personal experience,
> or opinions relating to this subject.

I totally agree. After tons of experimenting over the years, here is my
perfect background (foreground ALWAYS black):

Hue 33 Red 220
Sat 69 Green 215
Lum 194 Blue 192

I can work for hours without my eyes getting too tired. BTW, the
screen background around active windows is set to medium dark broken
green.

t.
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