Almost duplicate filenames [Case (in)sensitivity problems]

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schmultzburger

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Jan 6, 2006, 9:36:15 AM1/6/06
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I have 20-some gigs of around 6500 files and folders that I need to move from a
Mini running 10.4 to an iBook running 10.3, and I've run into an interesting
problem...

10.4 is case-sensitive and 10.3 is only case preserving. This means that I
can't do this transfer with a file structure made of things from various sources
that contains something like this:
.
.
.
Fall_04
JanesBoat.jpg
Jim_at_Lake.jpg
Jim_at_lake.jpg
FredAndJane.jpg
FredandJane.jpg
fall_04
janesboat.jpg
FredAndJane.jpg
winter_05
JimsBday.jpg
Jimsbday.jpg
JimsParty
Fredsings.jpg
FredSings.jpg
JimsBday.jpg
.
.
.

As you can see there are file and folder names that only differ by case within
the same folder. There are also file names that differ in the same way in
different (by case only) directories. When I try to move/copy the files, I get
a strange error about filenames that only differ by a few characters.

I don't think the percentage of almost duplicate names is very large (less than
1%), so all I'm looking to do is get a list of all the duplicate files and their
paths so I can manually adjust those names. The near-duplicate names in
different directories can be changed on a second round if they aren't found
initially.

I have searched high and low for something that will work to no avail. I'm
thinking I may need to roll my own, but that is going to take a lot of research
since I barely know scripting.

Does anyone know of an app that can even do a case-insensitive search for
duplicates? Maybe there is an Applescript guru out there who could whip one up?

TIA
S-

Dave Balderstone

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Jan 6, 2006, 9:55:49 AM1/6/06
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In article <11rt05u...@corp.supernews.com>, schmultzburger
<SPAMb...@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Does anyone know of an app that can even do a case-insensitive search for
> duplicates?

Have you tried Doublet Scan 10?

<http://hyperbolicsoftware.com/>

djb

--
The moral difference between a soldier and a civilian is that the soldier
accepts personal responsibility for the safety of the body politic of which he
is a member. The civilian does not. ã Robert A. Heinlein

schmultzburger

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Jan 6, 2006, 10:44:11 AM1/6/06
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Dave Balderstone wrote:
> In article <11rt05u...@corp.supernews.com>, schmultzburger
> <SPAMb...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Does anyone know of an app that can even do a case-insensitive search for
>> duplicates?
>
> Have you tried Doublet Scan 10?
>
> <http://hyperbolicsoftware.com/>
>
> djb
>
Thanks for the suggestion, but It's not going to work for me.

I just took a look at "TidyUp" (the new name), and while it does find names in a
case-insensitive manner, it finds all duplicates not just the ones in the same
location. Running this on my 6000+ plus files gave me over 1100 duplicates many
of which I know are not a problem because they are in completely seperate,
unrelated sub folders.

S-

Steve W. Jackson

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Jan 6, 2006, 4:52:58 PM1/6/06
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In article <11rt05u...@corp.supernews.com>,
schmultzburger <SPAMb...@yahoo.com> wrote:

I'm not sure where you got the idea that 10.4 is case-sensitive. It's
not the OS behind this at all, but the filesystem. HFS+ (aka Mac OS
Extended) is case preserving, to the best of my knowledge. When I
updated my system from 10.3.9 by using the Archive and Install option, I
still have the same underlying filesystem, and I am *not* allowed to
create files differing only in name. I'm told that the name is already
taken. There may be an updated filesystem included with the 10.4
install had I used the erase and install option.

= Steve =
--
Steve W. Jackson
Montgomery, Alabama

Ron Shepard

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Jan 7, 2006, 12:28:17 PM1/7/06
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In article <stevewjackson-717...@individual.net>,

"Steve W. Jackson" <stevew...@charter.net> wrote:

> I'm not sure where you got the idea that 10.4 is case-sensitive. It's
> not the OS behind this at all, but the filesystem.

Yes, 10.4, 10.3, 10.2 and probably earlier versions (I don't
remember) are all the same, they all support case-sensitive file
systems. There is a ufs filesystem that you can install on your
local disks with disk utility, and there is support, through nfs for
example, for remote case-sensitive file systems.

The new thing that was added with 10.4 is support for a case
sensitive version of HFS+.

The OP's problem is that he is moving a group of files from a case
sensitive filesystem to a case insensitive filesystem, HFS+. This
is the same problem that many of us have had for the past five years
in moving files from other unix machines to MacOSX. One solution is
to rename the offending files.

Another approach is to create a ufs disk image on the HFS+ file
system. This will be a case sensitive filesystem even though it is
sitting on a HFS+ disk. No actual disk reformatting is necessary.
You mount the disk image by double clicking it. If it is just a
matter of temporary storage, this may be the simplest approach. If
it is a filesystem that will see heavy use and where performance
will be important, then maybe this isn't the best solution. Also,
there are some Mac applications that do not handle correctly the
case sensitivity (which is why Apple recommends against using HFS+cs
as the startup disk), although in the OP's case this should not an
issue since he is coming from MacOSX in the first place.

$.02 -Ron Shepard

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