Blocking the neighbor's WiFi

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Otto Pylot

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Nov 28, 2012, 9:30:46 PM11/28/12
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I'm almost embarrassed to ask this but is there anyway to block my
neighbors WiFi signals from intruding into my home? I have an AEBS (4th
Gen) router. We have numerous WiFi devices that have always worked
perfectly for a long time. About a month ago I bought an iPhone 5. WiFi
worked great with a nice strong signal. My daughter has an iPhone 4
which has always worked equally as well. When she was home for the
holidays she was complaining that she couldn't connect to our network.
I noticed that my iPhone was also having the same issue (from the same
location in the house btw). Firing up iStumbler I noticed that there
were a lot more WIFI signals detectable from the same location in my
house than there used to be. Some quite strong and all protected.
Moving the iPhones around the house resolved the connection issues. So
I'm thinking that in the family room, there are very strong
neighborhood signals that are causing the iPhones to search and attempt
to lock on to. The other WiFi devices in the family room don't seem to
be having connection issues. So, is this 1) an issue unique to the
iPhones? 2) an AEBS setup issue? 3) true interference from the
neighbors WiFIs? 4) can I make my WiFi signal (2.4GHz) stronger to
"overpower" the other signals? and 5) is there really anything I can do
about it or is this just life in the WiFi age? Oh, and we have a
utility SmartMeter on the same side of the house but I've never noticed
any interference issues with it. Thanks.

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replacing invalid with sonic.

Tom Stiller

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Nov 28, 2012, 10:23:38 PM11/28/12
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In article <281120121830466586%ot...@bogus.address.com>,
Try assigning different channels to your AEBS.

--
PRAY, v. To ask that the laws of the universe be annulled in behalf
of a single petitioner confessedly unworthy. -- Ambrose Bierce

nospam

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Nov 29, 2012, 1:37:28 AM11/29/12
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> I'm almost embarrassed to ask this but is there anyway to block my
> neighbors WiFi signals from intruding into my home?

there is wifi blocking wallpaper, but unless you cover the windows too,
it's not really going to help.

<http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/05/anti-wifi-wallpap
er-lets-cellular-and-radio-through/>

> I have an AEBS (4th
> Gen) router. We have numerous WiFi devices that have always worked
> perfectly for a long time. About a month ago I bought an iPhone 5. WiFi
> worked great with a nice strong signal. My daughter has an iPhone 4
> which has always worked equally as well. When she was home for the
> holidays she was complaining that she couldn't connect to our network.
> I noticed that my iPhone was also having the same issue (from the same
> location in the house btw). Firing up iStumbler I noticed that there
> were a lot more WIFI signals detectable from the same location in my
> house than there used to be. Some quite strong and all protected.
> Moving the iPhones around the house resolved the connection issues. So
> I'm thinking that in the family room, there are very strong
> neighborhood signals that are causing the iPhones to search and attempt
> to lock on to. The other WiFi devices in the family room don't seem to
> be having connection issues. So, is this 1) an issue unique to the
> iPhones? 2) an AEBS setup issue? 3) true interference from the
> neighbors WiFIs? 4) can I make my WiFi signal (2.4GHz) stronger to
> "overpower" the other signals? and 5) is there really anything I can do
> about it or is this just life in the WiFi age? Oh, and we have a
> utility SmartMeter on the same side of the house but I've never noticed
> any interference issues with it. Thanks.

there's not much you can do, but a signal from a neighboring house
should be weaker than one from your own house.

you could move your base station so it's stronger in the family room,
or maybe get a second one for that end of the house.

you could pick a different channel but that probably won't help that
much since the devices seek the strongest signal. however, if you turn
off auto-join, it will join only networks you've previously associated,
which would be yours and not your neighbor's.

if all devices support 5 ghz, you could switch to that, but in your
case that won't work since one device is an iphone 4 and it does not
support 5 ghz.

Otto Pylot

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Nov 28, 2012, 11:41:10 PM11/28/12
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In article <281120122237289291%nos...@nospam.invalid>, nospam
To answer both of you, I have assigned different channels and currently
have it set to automatic for 2.4GHz (which is currently assigned to
channel 1). 5GHz is set to channel 149.

I've heard of the wallpaper and such for businesses but that's not an
option.

The AEBS is in the "computer room", on a desk at the far wall. I could
probably move it about 6' closer to the doorway (which would make it
closer to the family room in terms of footage) and about 4' higher on a
metal filing cabinet.

I've thought about an Apple Express for the family room but I'm not
familiar with extending the signal and I'm afraid it would still pick
up "interference" from the neighbors.

I hadn't thought about auto-join for my laptop and the iPhone 5 (and
4). Is there a way to delete the networks I don't want now, leave the
ones that I do want, and then turn-off auto-join? This is really more
for my iPhone 5 (which is where I really want the selectivity).

The only devices that support 5GHz are my MacBook Air, the ATV2, and
the iPhone 5.

Thanks for the replies. Gives me something to think about.

nospam

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Nov 29, 2012, 2:52:24 AM11/29/12
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In article <281120122041103024%ot...@bogus.address.com>, Otto Pylot
<ot...@bogus.address.com> wrote:

> The AEBS is in the "computer room", on a desk at the far wall. I could
> probably move it about 6' closer to the doorway (which would make it
> closer to the family room in terms of footage) and about 4' higher on a
> metal filing cabinet.

the metal cabinet might be an issue. try other locations.

> I've thought about an Apple Express for the family room but I'm not
> familiar with extending the signal and I'm afraid it would still pick
> up "interference" from the neighbors.

it should work, depending how you set it up. ideally, you should run a
cable to the other end of the house and set up another base station, or
at least a cable to the middle of the house and put the single base
station there.

having a base station wirelessly extend it sometimes has issues when
the client device is in the middle of the two. it's best when it's
linear.

> I hadn't thought about auto-join for my laptop and the iPhone 5 (and
> 4). Is there a way to delete the networks I don't want now, leave the
> ones that I do want, and then turn-off auto-join? This is really more
> for my iPhone 5 (which is where I really want the selectivity).

you can join the networks you don't want to join and then tap the blue
arrow and then the forget this network button. you can review what it
knows about with one of the backup extractor utilities and read the
plist. if you've never joined the neighbor's network then it's not in
there so no need to delete.
Message has been deleted

Otto Pylot

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Nov 29, 2012, 1:53:51 AM11/29/12
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In article <281120122352249038%nos...@nospam.invalid>, nospam
I've always had a bad feeling about the metal filing cabinet because it
sits between the AEBS (which is about 7' away and on a desk) and the
doorway of the room. However, I've had very few issues in the past with
WiFi until I got the iPhone 5 (and the 4 came home for the holiday).

Running cable is not an option.

I've never joined any of the neighbors networks. I just see them listed
under the Airport icon on my Air (and the list seems to be getting
longer every week). I just figured if they were listed as detectable,
then the iPhone (or the Air) would try to connect and if the strength
of the signals (mine and their's) fluctuated, then the iPhone would be
constantly trying to connect to the stronger signal, and if
unsuccessful, go on to the next one. Or do I have that all wrong?

nospam

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Nov 29, 2012, 5:35:24 AM11/29/12
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In article <281120122253511768%ot...@bogus.address.com>, Otto Pylot
<ot...@bogus.address.com> wrote:

> I've always had a bad feeling about the metal filing cabinet because it
> sits between the AEBS (which is about 7' away and on a desk) and the
> doorway of the room. However, I've had very few issues in the past with
> WiFi until I got the iPhone 5 (and the 4 came home for the holiday).

that's not good. can you put it higher up, well above the metal cabinet?

> Running cable is not an option.

oh well.

> I've never joined any of the neighbors networks.

then it won't auto-join them if you have auto-join disabled.

> I just see them listed
> under the Airport icon on my Air (and the list seems to be getting
> longer every week). I just figured if they were listed as detectable,
> then the iPhone (or the Air) would try to connect and if the strength
> of the signals (mine and their's) fluctuated, then the iPhone would be
> constantly trying to connect to the stronger signal, and if
> unsuccessful, go on to the next one. Or do I have that all wrong?

it won't if you set it to not do that.

Suze

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Nov 29, 2012, 2:31:49 PM11/29/12
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In article <281120122041103024%ot...@bogus.address.com>,
Otto Pylot <ot...@bogus.address.com> wrote:

> The AEBS is in the "computer room", on a desk at the far wall. I could
> probably move it about 6' closer to the doorway (which would make it
> closer to the family room in terms of footage) and about 4' higher on a
> metal filing cabinet.

If you want height, consider possibly mounting the unit on an interior
wall in a more central location.
http://h-sq.com/products/airmount/index.html
--
Live every day like it's your last--someday you'll be right.

Fred McKenzie

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Nov 29, 2012, 6:44:07 PM11/29/12
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In article <281120122041103024%ot...@bogus.address.com>,
Otto Pylot <ot...@bogus.address.com> wrote:

> I have assigned different channels and currently
> have it set to automatic for 2.4GHz (which is currently assigned to
> channel 1).

Otto-

WiFi channels overlap in the 2.4 GHz band. Use iStumbler to see what
channel the strongest interfering signal is on, at the place where you
have trouble. Choose one of the non-overlapping channels 1, 6 or 11, to
avoid the interfering signal.

Fred

Lampje

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Nov 29, 2012, 7:03:18 PM11/29/12
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Op 29-11-12 07:53, Otto Pylot schreef:
> I've always had a bad feeling about the metal filing cabinet because it
> sits between the AEBS (which is about 7' away and on a desk) and the
> doorway of the room.

Sender (AEBS) and receiver (any connected device) need preferably a
"free line of sight". Anything metal (filing cabinet, concrete) in
between will shield the signal. That it still works is that the signal
is coming through by reflection via other metal surfaces (a "detour")
If there is a "free line of sight" form the top of the metal filing
cabinet that might be preferable (antennae best pointing away (vertical)
from any metal surface). Brick, wood or drywall have very little
influence, they're "invisible" as far as signal is concerned (on higher
frequencies less "invisible" as on lower, so 2,4 MHz works probably
better through a (few) walls than 5MHz).

Lampje

Bob Harris

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Nov 29, 2012, 9:59:05 PM11/29/12
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In article <281120121830466586%ot...@bogus.address.com>,
Change your 2.4GHz channel. As others have mentioned 1, 6 and 11
do not overlap with any other channel. Basically a channel is a
bell curve that is strongest in the middle and fans out 2 channels
below and above your channel, which is why 1, 6 and 11 do not
overlap.

iStumble will tell you which neighbor WiFi channels are strongest.
Make sure you choose a channel that has the least overlap with
your strongest neighbor's signals, and if you have to overlap, try
to make it the weakest signals.

Putting your WiFi base station in the center of the house and
closest to the places where you use your devices the most is the
best idea (and maybe further from your strongest neighbors).

If you cannot run ethernet from the broadband modem (the best
suggestion), then consider using Ethernet PowerLine Adaptors
(Google "ethernet power line adaptors" and you will find lots of
hits). A pair of these adaptors will allow you to place your
Airport Extreme base station anywhere in your house.

Since you say your neighbors all have their network "Protected"
you do not need to worry about your devices trying to connect with
them, as your devices do not have the passwords, so they will be
ignored. And since your devices do have the password to your WiFi
network, they will default to using your network.

The iPhone 4s and older are 2.4GHz WiFi devices. I think the
iPhone 5 might have 5GHz WiFi support, but I'm not positive.

In general 5GHz 802.11n WiFi does not see much interference. 1st
it actually has a lower range, so it is more difficult for
neighbors to overlap and interfere, I think the 5GHz channel
layout does not have the same 5 channel overlap, so each channel
does not interfere with the adjacent channel, and at the moment,
there are fewer 5GHz 802.11n base stations (this will change and
you will find more overlap as time goes on).

If you are going to consider an Airport Express as a range
extender, it is fairly easy to setup an extended network between 2
Apple WiFi base stations over WiFi (no wires needed). Airport
Utility -> Airport WiFi base station -> Wireless -> Network Mode
-> Extend a wireless network is where you start.

The alternative is to connect the 2 WiFi base stations via
ethernet. If you cannot run an ethernet cable, then again
consider Ethernet PowerLine Adaptors. It would be best to NOT use
powerline adaptors for BOTH moving the AEBS to a central location
AND to connect a 2nd AXBS. Rather leave the AEBS directly
connected to the broadband modem, and use powerline adaptors to
connect the AEBS to the AXBS. You then configure the AXBS for
"Bridge Mode" so it disables routing on the 2nd device (you only
want 1 router in your home; the 2nd device should just extend the
existing network not create its own; Airport Utility -> AXBS ->
Network -> Router Mode -> Off (Bridge Mode). Now assign the AXBS
its a separate 2.4GHz channel at least 5 channels away from your
AEBS (you do not want to interfere with yourself). And give the
AXBS the same "Wireless Network Name" and Security password as the
AEBS. This will setup a "Roaming Network" that allows you to move
between AEBS and AXBS dynamically switching to the strongest
signal without loosing any internet connections you have running
(such as Skype, Facetime, Screen Sharing, etc...).

Otto Pylot

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Nov 30, 2012, 12:13:04 AM11/30/12
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In article
<nospam.News.Bob-97...@news.eternal-september.org>, Bob
Thanks everyone for your replies and suggestions. WiFi was so much
easier a few years ago when everything and everybody wasn't using WiFi.
I bought a copy of Glen Fleishman's ebook on Airport setup and
troubleshooting (recent version) and it basically reiterates what most
are saying here. One last thing. Is there any real advantage to
assigning a static IP address, based on the MAC address, to an iPhone
5?

nospam

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Nov 30, 2012, 3:34:08 AM11/30/12
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In article <291120122113049627%ot...@bogus.address.com>, Otto Pylot
not really.

David Stone

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Nov 30, 2012, 9:52:37 AM11/30/12
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In article <k98t4b$ce9$1...@dont-email.me>,
Lampje <eternal-septe...@antichef.net> wrote:

> Op 29-11-12 07:53, Otto Pylot schreef:
> > I've always had a bad feeling about the metal filing cabinet because it
> > sits between the AEBS (which is about 7' away and on a desk) and the
> > doorway of the room.
>
> Sender (AEBS) and receiver (any connected device) need preferably a
> "free line of sight". Anything metal (filing cabinet, concrete) in
> between will shield the signal. That it still works is that the signal
> is coming through by reflection via other metal surfaces (a "detour")
> If there is a "free line of sight" form the top of the metal filing
> cabinet that might be preferable (antennae best pointing away (vertical)
> from any metal surface).

The problem with having the base station on a metal filing cabinet
is not that the signal is blocked, but that a significant
proportion of the signal will be "pulled" in to the cabinet (power
loss). Could be worse, though - one office I know of had a wireless
sitting on top of a safe...

Thomas R. Kettler

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Nov 30, 2012, 2:22:26 PM11/30/12
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In article <no.email-C5451E...@news.eternal-september.org>,
They should have had it on top of Big Ben instead:

<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSGT6SSI0lA>
--
Remove blown from email address to reply.

Bob Harris

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Nov 30, 2012, 7:47:36 PM11/30/12
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In article <291120122113049627%ot...@bogus.address.com>,
Not really. Having a fixed IP address is most useful if you are
going to connect to the device, so you always know its address.
In general the iPhone does not act as a server, so there is no
reason it needs a fixed IP address. Then again, if you find
having a fixed IP address solves some problem, then it does not
hurt.

Otto Pylot

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Dec 1, 2012, 12:22:03 AM12/1/12
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In article
<nospam.News.Bob-45...@news.eternal-september.org>, Bob
Wow. So much good information I hardly know where to start but to say
thanks to everyone who took the time to answer. The cordless phones
(2.4GHz) or microwave aren't an issue. We can talk on the landline
and/or make popcorn without any noticeable interference (even streaming
NetFlix). Sounds like the first place to start is the metal filing
cabinet. It never seemed to be an issue before but who knows with
changing conditions etc.

Fred McKenzie

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Dec 2, 2012, 1:56:11 PM12/2/12
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In article <301120122122039715%ot...@bogus.address.com>,
Otto-

Since it was not an issue before, you may get the relief you need from
just choosing a less congested channel.

Yes, a metal filing cabinet can block the signal if you are directly
behind and close to it. At a greater distance, it matters less.

Placing the WiFi router on top of a metal filing cabinet may change the
router's antenna pattern (direction). Setting it on top of some kind of
insulating object like a cardboard box could help. Five or ten inches
should do it. If you raise the router and it gets worse, then the
filing cabinet was helping not hurting!

I think the object should be to centrally locate the router, as high as
possible.

Fred
Message has been deleted

Jolly Roger

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Dec 27, 2015, 2:03:00 PM12/27/15
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Apple's devices are more discerning than others when it comes to
connecting to WiFi networks, in that weaker signals or signals with
more noise are often ignored / filtered out because connecting to them
would result in a connection that does not perform well.

If you have a lot of competing access points in the vicinity, and your
router is located in a room that is far enough away from the family room
that the signal to noise ratio is bad there, you could extend your
network into the family room by adding another Airport Extreme/Express
configured to extend the network, which would give you a much stronger
signal in that room. That's what I've done with a pair of Airport
Extreme access points while living in crowded apartment complexes where
there can be 20 or more competing access points in close proximity, and
it does a decent job of ensuring a good connection in all rooms.

You might try mapping your network with a tool like this to get a visual
indication of signal strength and noise ratio in different locations in
your home:

<https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/netspot-wifi-survey-wireless/id514951692?mt=12>

As far as blocking competing signals, that can be done as well, but
requires physical shielding with a metal material that blocks WiFi radio
frequencies. You'd basically have to use a tool to figure out where
competing signals are strongest, and then place blocking material in
between to block those unwanted signals. I haven't ever had to bother
doing anything like that myself. See:

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage>

--
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my ravenous SPAM filter.
I often ignore posts from Google. Use a real news client instead.

JR

Happy.Hobo

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Dec 27, 2015, 9:35:13 PM12/27/15
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On 12-27-2015 08:29, scibur...@gmail.com wrote:
>>location in the house btw). Firing up iStumbler I noticed that there
>>were a lot more WIFI signals detectable from the same location in my
>>house than there used to be. Some quite strong and all protected.

Is there an unused channel,
and can you tell your access point to use it?

nospam

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Dec 27, 2015, 9:40:56 PM12/27/15
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In article <n5q74v$8sm$1...@speranza.aioe.org>, Happy.Hobo
<Happy...@Spam.Invalid> wrote:

> >>location in the house btw). Firing up iStumbler I noticed that there
> >>were a lot more WIFI signals detectable from the same location in my
> >>house than there used to be. Some quite strong and all protected.
>
> Is there an unused channel,

for 2.4ghz, there are 11 overlapping channels (in the usa), giving
effectively only 3 non-overlapping channels.

> and can you tell your access point to use it?

it can be set to use a specific wifi network.

Happy.Hobo

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Dec 29, 2015, 4:08:53 PM12/29/15
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On 12-27-2015 20:40, nospam wrote:
> In article <n5q74v$8sm$1...@speranza.aioe.org>, Happy.Hobo
> <Happy...@Spam.Invalid> wrote:
>>>> location in the house btw). Firing up iStumbler I noticed that there
>>>> were a lot more WIFI signals detectable from the same location in my
>>>> house than there used to be. Some quite strong and all protected.
>>
>> Is there an unused channel,
>
> for 2.4ghz, there are 11 overlapping channels (in the usa), giving
> effectively only 3 non-overlapping channels.

Irrelevant. The question is still whether there is one he can use.

>> and can you tell your access point to use it?
>
> it can be set to use a specific wifi network.

I suspect you don't know whether OP has a device that can change
channels or is limited to one or limited to "automatic" (which can fail
to switch to something that actually works).

nospam

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Dec 29, 2015, 4:23:43 PM12/29/15
to
In article <n5usp1$bog$1...@speranza.aioe.org>, Happy.Hobo
<Happy...@Spam.Invalid> wrote:

> >>>> location in the house btw). Firing up iStumbler I noticed that there
> >>>> were a lot more WIFI signals detectable from the same location in my
> >>>> house than there used to be. Some quite strong and all protected.
> >>
> >> Is there an unused channel,
> >
> > for 2.4ghz, there are 11 overlapping channels (in the usa), giving
> > effectively only 3 non-overlapping channels.
>
> Irrelevant. The question is still whether there is one he can use.

it's not irrelevant.

there are only 3 channels available without overlap, so it's pretty
much guaranteed that in any non-rural area, there *will* be other wifi
networks in use.

in an apartment setting, it's possible that several of them will be
strong enough to cause a problem. with houses and certainly in rural
areas, neighbor's networks will be weak and won't matter much, if at
all.

> >> and can you tell your access point to use it?
> >
> > it can be set to use a specific wifi network.
>
> I suspect you don't know whether OP has a device that can change
> channels or is limited to one or limited to "automatic" (which can fail
> to switch to something that actually works).

automatic is not a limitation.

Happy.Hobo

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Dec 29, 2015, 5:01:05 PM12/29/15
to
On 12-29-2015 15:23, nospam wrote:
> In article <n5usp1$bog$1...@speranza.aioe.org>, Happy.Hobo
> <Happy...@Spam.Invalid> wrote:

>> Irrelevant. The question is still whether there is one he can use.
>
> it's not irrelevant.
>
> there are only 3 channels available without overlap, so it's pretty
> much guaranteed that in any non-rural area, there *will* be other wifi
> networks in use.

Worked for me when I had an AP that allowed me to pick the channel after
"automatic" failed to find a good one.

>>>> and can you tell your access point to use it?
>>>
>>> it can be set to use a specific wifi network.
>>
>> I suspect you don't know whether OP has a device that can change
>> channels or is limited to one or limited to "automatic" (which can fail
>> to switch to something that actually works).
>
> automatic is not a limitation.

It obviously was in the case above. As was my other AP that did not
allow me to make a choice.

zethn...@gmail.com

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Mar 4, 2017, 10:28:01 PM3/4/17
to
That's some good info Bob H. Thanks for sharing.

lucyhun...@gmail.com

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Dec 5, 2018, 7:05:08 PM12/5/18
to
Hi there
CAn someone tell me how to block Wifi signals full stop without resorting to using a radio frequency blocker?
We are being bombarded by Wifi signals from the neighbours in every direction, have informed them that they do not need Wifi on all day and night, and to use the LAN cable.

In the mean time our radio frequency receiver goes off into the red spectrum which means we are being radiated whilst siting in our living room, lounge and bedrooms on one side of the house. This is environmental pollution and should be illegal.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

On Thursday, November 29, 2012 at 3:30:46 PM UTC+13, Otto Pylot wrote:
> I'm almost embarrassed to ask this but is there anyway to block my
> neighbors WiFi signals from intruding into my home? I have an AEBS (4th
> Gen) router. We have numerous WiFi devices that have always worked
> perfectly for a long time. About a month ago I bought an iPhone 5. WiFi
> worked great with a nice strong signal. My daughter has an iPhone 4
> which has always worked equally as well. When she was home for the
> holidays she was complaining that she couldn't connect to our network.
> I noticed that my iPhone was also having the same issue (from the same
> location in the house btw). Firing up iStumbler I noticed that there
> were a lot more WIFI signals detectable from the same location in my
> house than there used to be. Some quite strong and all protected.
> Moving the iPhones around the house resolved the connection issues. So
> I'm thinking that in the family room, there are very strong
> neighborhood signals that are causing the iPhones to search and attempt
> to lock on to. The other WiFi devices in the family room don't seem to
> be having connection issues. So, is this 1) an issue unique to the
> iPhones? 2) an AEBS setup issue? 3) true interference from the
> neighbors WiFIs? 4) can I make my WiFi signal (2.4GHz) stronger to
> "overpower" the other signals? and 5) is there really anything I can do
> about it or is this just life in the WiFi age? Oh, and we have a
> utility SmartMeter on the same side of the house but I've never noticed
> any interference issues with it. Thanks.
>

nospam

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Dec 5, 2018, 10:46:50 PM12/5/18
to
In article <719cbf80-ec83-4205...@googlegroups.com>,
<lucyhun...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi there
> CAn someone tell me how to block Wifi signals full stop without resorting to
> using a radio frequency blocker?

cut the power to your neighborhood.

> We are being bombarded by Wifi signals from the neighbours in every
> direction, have informed them that they do not need Wifi on all day and
> night, and to use the LAN cable.

you're being 'bombarded' by tv, radio, cellular, police, fire and many
other services, all of which transmit at *significantly* more power
than wifi.

> In the mean time our radio frequency receiver goes off into the red spectrum
> which means we are being radiated whilst siting in our living room, lounge
> and bedrooms on one side of the house.

turn it off and it won't go red.

> This is environmental pollution and
> should be illegal.

nonsense.

> Any help would be appreciated.

you're beyond help.

lucyhun...@gmail.com

unread,
Dec 6, 2018, 1:40:09 AM12/6/18
to
Sounds like you're the one in need of help. Wifi is as dangerous if not more dangerous than a lot of radio frequencies in local communities as they are emitted directly inside the premises where people are working and living. If you knew anything about radio frequencies and how they disrupt human cells, then you wouldn't be running off your stupid mouth in such an ignorant manner.

Navy communications engineers and physicists would tend to disagree with your pathetic response as I do.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z99_SzoXZdY&t=18s

So F off and don't waste my time.


On Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 4:46:50 PM UTC+13, nospam wrote:
> In article <719cbf80-ec83-4205...@googlegroups.com>,

lucyhun...@gmail.com

unread,
Dec 6, 2018, 1:41:16 AM12/6/18
to
On Thursday, November 29, 2012 at 7:37:28 PM UTC+13, nospam wrote:
> In article <281120121830466586%ot...@bogus.address.com>, Otto Pylot
> <ot...@bogus.address.com> wrote:
>
> > I'm almost embarrassed to ask this but is there anyway to block my
> > neighbors WiFi signals from intruding into my home?
>
> there is wifi blocking wallpaper, but unless you cover the windows too,
> it's not really going to help.
>
> <http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/05/anti-wifi-wallpap
> er-lets-cellular-and-radio-through/>
>
> > I have an AEBS (4th
> > Gen) router. We have numerous WiFi devices that have always worked
> > perfectly for a long time. About a month ago I bought an iPhone 5. WiFi
> > worked great with a nice strong signal. My daughter has an iPhone 4
> > which has always worked equally as well. When she was home for the
> > holidays she was complaining that she couldn't connect to our network.
> > I noticed that my iPhone was also having the same issue (from the same
> > location in the house btw). Firing up iStumbler I noticed that there
> > were a lot more WIFI signals detectable from the same location in my
> > house than there used to be. Some quite strong and all protected.
> > Moving the iPhones around the house resolved the connection issues. So
> > I'm thinking that in the family room, there are very strong
> > neighborhood signals that are causing the iPhones to search and attempt
> > to lock on to. The other WiFi devices in the family room don't seem to
> > be having connection issues. So, is this 1) an issue unique to the
> > iPhones? 2) an AEBS setup issue? 3) true interference from the
> > neighbors WiFIs? 4) can I make my WiFi signal (2.4GHz) stronger to
> > "overpower" the other signals? and 5) is there really anything I can do
> > about it or is this just life in the WiFi age? Oh, and we have a
> > utility SmartMeter on the same side of the house but I've never noticed
> > any interference issues with it. Thanks.
>
> there's not much you can do, but a signal from a neighboring house
> should be weaker than one from your own house.
>
> you could move your base station so it's stronger in the family room,
> or maybe get a second one for that end of the house.
>
> you could pick a different channel but that probably won't help that
> much since the devices seek the strongest signal. however, if you turn
> off auto-join, it will join only networks you've previously associated,
> which would be yours and not your neighbor's.
>
> if all devices support 5 ghz, you could switch to that, but in your
> case that won't work since one device is an iphone 4 and it does not
> support 5 ghz.

You should wrap it around your head to stop the leakage from your mouth, it seems to be spewing rubbish!

nospam

unread,
Dec 6, 2018, 2:14:41 AM12/6/18
to
In article <b4952766-a023-44e8...@googlegroups.com>,
<lucyhun...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Sounds like you're the one in need of help. Wifi is as dangerous if not more
> dangerous than a lot of radio frequencies in local communities as they are
> emitted directly inside the premises where people are working and living.

nonsense, especially at the power levels of wifi (milliwatts).

radio & tv are *far* more powerful.

> If
> you knew anything about radio frequencies and how they disrupt human cells,
> then you wouldn't be running off your stupid mouth in such an ignorant
> manner.

there is *zero* proof that rf at the power levels of consumer devices
cause any problems.

people have been holding cellular phones next to their brain for nearly
40 years without issue, and those old analog cellular phones were
higher power than what exists today.

> Navy communications engineers and physicists would tend to disagree with your
> pathetic response as I do.

no they don't.

> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z99_SzoXZdY&t=18s

microwave warfare is very different than consumer wifi.

> So F off and don't waste my time.

no. you're entertaining. and stupid.

lucyhun...@gmail.com

unread,
Dec 6, 2018, 3:00:16 AM12/6/18
to
On Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 8:14:41 PM UTC+13, nospam wrote:
> In article <b4952766-a023-44e8...@googlegroups.com>,
> <lucyh...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Sounds like you're the one in need of help. Wifi is as dangerous if not more
> > dangerous than a lot of radio frequencies in local communities as they are
> > emitted directly inside the premises where people are working and living.
>
> nonsense, especially at the power levels of wifi (milliwatts). Shows how uninformed and intellectually handicapped you are.
>
> radio & tv are *far* more powerful. Rubbish, if that was the case my RF meter would be going off in front of it, its doesn't. It goes off at radio frequencies from the WiFri and cellular. Even in the middle of our street the RF from Wifri is incredibly high.
>
> > If
> > you knew anything about radio frequencies and how they disrupt human cells,
> > then you wouldn't be running off your stupid mouth in such an ignorant
> > manner.
>
> there is *zero* proof that rf at the power levels of consumer devices
> cause any problems. More rubbish - I suppose you believe everything your Govt tells you. I worked in cellular comms for years and my brother in the Navy as a Telecoms engineer and what you spout is utter crap and ignorance. Its the typical line Govt's and Govt agencies take.

Anyone whom has worked in RF knows the dangers, and Wifri is up there, and once 5G is fully operational it will kill more people than cellular as 5G transmitters will be on every street corner, one for every dozen houses.
>
> people have been holding cellular phones next to their brain for nearly
> 40 years without issue, and those old analog cellular phones were
> higher power than what exists today.
>
> > Navy communications engineers and physicists would tend to disagree with your
> > pathetic response as I do.
>
> no they don't. Yes they do, me my brother and my radio engineers the globe over including the one in the link sent to you - and he's a physicist.

Keep you ignorant comments to yourself and your Govt wako's as they have to preach the BS they do or they do not have a job.


>
> > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z99_SzoXZdY&t=18s
>
> microwave warfare is very different than consumer wifi.
>
> > So F off and don't waste my time.
>
> no. you're entertaining. and stupid. People like you will put your hand up when they say we need to depopulate as you are so stupid, you will believe them. Anyone with half a brain knows that RF radio radiation kills - slowly, and the higher the frequency the faster.

Comments from your are now automatic trash - you know spam folder.

Jean-Pierre Kuypers

unread,
Dec 6, 2018, 5:18:15 AM12/6/18
to
In article (Dans l'article)
<719cbf80-ec83-4205...@googlegroups.com>,
<lucyhun...@gmail.com> wrote (écrivait) :

> CAn someone tell me how to block Wifi signals full stop without resorting to
> using a radio frequency blocker?

You may to update to Mojave and try the dark mode, maybe.

<https://www.macworld.com/article/3283342/os-x/article.html>

--
Jean-Pierre Kuypers

Barry Margolin

unread,
Dec 6, 2018, 12:09:51 PM12/6/18
to
> Sounds like you're the one in need of help. Wifi is as dangerous if not more
> dangerous than a lot of radio frequencies in local communities as they are
> emitted directly inside the premises where people are working and living.

But the WiFi you're talking about is being emitted in a DIFFERENT
premise than yours. The distance and walls between the homes will
attenuate most of the signal.

I live in a one-bedroom apartment, and have my router in my living room.
When I take my tablet into the bedroom about 30 feet away, I lose one
bar. And if I try to use it one flight up in the laundry room, I can't
get a connection at all.

--
Barry Margolin, bar...@alum.mit.edu
Arlington, MA
*** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***

lucyhun...@gmail.com

unread,
Dec 6, 2018, 3:03:14 PM12/6/18
to
On Friday, December 7, 2018 at 6:09:51 AM UTC+13, Barry Margolin wrote:
> In article <b4952766-a023-44e8...@googlegroups.com>,
I would have thought that correct but its not. Our smart phones are picking the signal from the neighbors WiFri, and as we have a RF (RX & TX) hand held device that picks up all radio frequencies, its showing us that the signal is very strong. Even in the middle of the street the RF receiver is going off into the red telling me the signal is very strong, and is pointing towards the neighbours houses.

Please watch the video from the Physicist and X Navy engineer who tells us why Wifri is so bad, just as cellular is.

One more test, put a pot plant next to you wifi modem and watch as it slowly withers and dies. This is what RF signals are doing to human cells.

nospam

unread,
Dec 6, 2018, 3:21:14 PM12/6/18
to
In article <e33d8732-b0e1-4263...@googlegroups.com>,
<lucyhun...@gmail.com> wrote:

> One more test, put a pot plant next to you wifi modem and watch as it slowly
> withers and dies.

only because it's not near a window for sunlight and not watered often
enough.

or, you're smoking too much of it.

> This is what RF signals are doing to human cells.

yet somehow the human race (and animals, for that matter) has managed
to survive for more than 100 years while subjected to far more powerful
rf signals, with life expectancy *increasing* over that time.

Barry Margolin

unread,
Dec 10, 2018, 12:03:19 PM12/10/18
to
In article <061220181521130087%nos...@nospam.invalid>,
I heard that life expectancy in the US has actually declined in the last
few years. I guess all those radio signals are finally catching up on us
:)

daquila...@gmail.com

unread,
Apr 7, 2020, 1:22:20 PM4/7/20
to
Il giorno giovedì 29 novembre 2012 03:30:46 UTC+1, Otto Pylot ha scritto:
> I'm almost embarrassed to ask this but is there anyway to block my
> neighbors WiFi signals from intruding into my home? I have an AEBS (4th
> Gen) router. We have numerous WiFi devices that have always worked
> perfectly for a long time. About a month ago I bought an iPhone 5. WiFi
> worked great with a nice strong signal. My daughter has an iPhone 4
> which has always worked equally as well. When she was home for the
> holidays she was complaining that she couldn't connect to our network.
> I noticed that my iPhone was also having the same issue (from the same
> location in the house btw). Firing up iStumbler I noticed that there
> were a lot more WIFI signals detectable from the same location in my
> house than there used to be. Some quite strong and all protected.
> Moving the iPhones around the house resolved the connection issues. So
> I'm thinking that in the family room, there are very strong
> neighborhood signals that are causing the iPhones to search and attempt
> to lock on to. The other WiFi devices in the family room don't seem to
> be having connection issues. So, is this 1) an issue unique to the
> iPhones? 2) an AEBS setup issue? 3) true interference from the
> neighbors WiFIs? 4) can I make my WiFi signal (2.4GHz) stronger to
> "overpower" the other signals? and 5) is there really anything I can do
> about it or is this just life in the WiFi age? Oh, and we have a
> utility SmartMeter on the same side of the house but I've never noticed
> any interference issues with it. Thanks.
>
> --
> Deja Moo: I've seen this bullshit before. Please respond to: sca...@invalid.net
> replacing invalid with sonic.

Try Block Nearby Wi-Fi 1.0

nospam

unread,
Apr 7, 2020, 2:08:10 PM4/7/20
to
In article <cbefdc19-f728-42d7...@googlegroups.com>,
<daquila...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Il giorno giovedě 29 novembre 2012 03:30:46 UTC+1, Otto Pylot ha scritto:
> > I'm almost embarrassed to ask this but is there anyway to block my
> > neighbors WiFi signals from intruding into my home? I have an AEBS (4th

...

> Try Block Nearby Wi-Fi 1.0


try looking at the date of the post. after 7.5 *years*, it's almost
certainly not a problem anymore.

nellyl...@gmail.com

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Sep 13, 2020, 6:40:47 PM9/13/20
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--
chri...@me.com is a filtered spam magnet. Email replies may be lost.
You're better off replying to this newsgroup.

nellyl...@gmail.com

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Sep 14, 2020, 12:40:45 AM9/14/20
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Sep 14, 2020, 12:44:27 AM9/14/20
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