Antec Basiq 500 Watt ATX Power Supply/PSU (BP500U) making loud noises?

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Ant

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Sep 9, 2010, 8:25:48 AM9/9/10
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Hello.

A technician installed a new Antec Basiq 500 Watt ATX Power Supply/PSU
(BP500U) on 1/23/2010 into my old PC to replace a dead previous, old PSU
since I am not a computer hardware person.

Lately, its PSU fan has been making loud noises. I have to hit/tap the
PSU fan area to make it stop. This always doesn't work either. I noticed
different its fan output, has noticeable changes in air output and
vibrations, between its quietness and noises. It doesn't look dusty
(can't open the PC case due to my physical disabilities, but can see the
fan through the dark vents). My place does get dusty and can get very
hot (almost 90F degrees in the heat waves) due to Los Angeles/L.A. weather.

Is this normal for a less than eight months old PSU? Or is this Antec
PSU brand/model just crap or am I just having a bad luck? Online, I saw
mostly positive reviews. There were a few that mentioned loud fans, but
not like mine. My old 600 watts SeaSonic S12 PSU, from 2006, still
works. It seems like Antec is crap these days?

If I do need to replace it when it gets worse or dies, which one should
I get that is better and low cost? Or should I keep the same brand and
model when RMA'ed Here is my old computer setup: AMD Athlon 64 X2 (dual
core) 939 4600+ CPU (using a Thermaltake Silent Boost K8 A1838 model),
MSI K8N NEO4-F (MS-7125) motherboard (NVIDIA nForce4), 2.5 GB of RAM
(one 1 GB + three 512 MB; use all four memory slots) refurbished (RMA'ed
twice!) EVGA GeForce 8800 GT (PCIE; NVIDIA), Enlight 7237-ATX mid-tower
case; Antec Basiq 500 Watt ATX Power Supply/PSU (BP500U), two case 80mm
case fans, Seagate Barracuda 7200.7 (ST380011A; 7200 RPM; 80 GB) HDD, an
IDE Quantum Fireball Plus LM 15 GB HDD, Toshiba DVD-ROM SD-M1612 Rev. B
16X/48X ATAPI/IDE drive, Plextor PX-W1210 PlexWriter (12/10/32A; IDE),
3.5" disk drive, and an Intel InBusiness 10/100 (82559) NIC. Running
32-bit Debian (Linux) OS (Kernel v2.6.32-...-686).

In a few months, I will be upgrading my system to an old Intel Intel
Core 2 Q8200 (quad-core; default clock speeds); Socket 775 LGA) with a
Scythe Andy Master 120mm CPU cooler (SCASM-1000), MSI P43 NEO3-F
(MSI-7514) motherboard (BIOS v2.3), etc. with the same mid-ATX case.

Thank you in advance. :)
--
"He who cannot pick up an ant, and wants to pick up an elephant will
some day see his folly." --African
/\___/\ Phil./Ant @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
/ /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
| |o o| |
\ _ / If crediting, then use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link.
( ) If e-mailing, then axe ANT from its address if needed.
Ant is currently not listening to any songs on this computer.

Arno

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Sep 9, 2010, 5:22:22 PM9/9/10
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In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant <a...@zimage.comant> wrote:
> Hello.

> A technician installed a new Antec Basiq 500 Watt ATX Power Supply/PSU
> (BP500U) on 1/23/2010 into my old PC to replace a dead previous, old PSU
> since I am not a computer hardware person.

> Lately, its PSU fan has been making loud noises. I have to hit/tap the
> PSU fan area to make it stop. This always doesn't work either. I noticed
> different its fan output, has noticeable changes in air output and
> vibrations, between its quietness and noises. It doesn't look dusty
> (can't open the PC case due to my physical disabilities, but can see the
> fan through the dark vents). My place does get dusty and can get very
> hot (almost 90F degrees in the heat waves) due to Los Angeles/L.A. weather.

Shot bearings. The problem here is a) it will get worse and b) when
it vibrates, the air throughput goes to hell. Dust and heat are
not to blame foe this, it is puerly low fan bearing quality, which
translates to low fan quality and price. Antec is high-priced trash
IMO.

> Is this normal for a less than eight months old PSU? Or is this Antec
> PSU brand/model just crap or am I just having a bad luck?

The fan very likely is of the ElCheapo variant, which makes the
whole PSU suspect. Normally this is not bad luck either, but
a systematic problem. And no, a reasonable quality bearing will
not have this problem after 8 months.

> Online, I saw
> mostly positive reviews. There were a few that mentioned loud fans, but
> not like mine. My old 600 watts SeaSonic S12 PSU, from 2006, still
> works. It seems like Antec is crap these days?

Antec was crap 5 years ago. Seasonic is so-so, but good value for money.
Antec is vastlu overpriced.

> If I do need to replace it when it gets worse or dies, which one should
> I get that is better and low cost?

Low cost is always a high risk.

> Or should I keep the same brand and
> model when RMA'ed Here is my old computer setup: AMD Athlon 64 X2 (dual
> core) 939 4600+ CPU (using a Thermaltake Silent Boost K8 A1838 model),
> MSI K8N NEO4-F (MS-7125) motherboard (NVIDIA nForce4), 2.5 GB of RAM
> (one 1 GB + three 512 MB; use all four memory slots) refurbished (RMA'ed
> twice!) EVGA GeForce 8800 GT (PCIE; NVIDIA), Enlight 7237-ATX mid-tower
> case; Antec Basiq 500 Watt ATX Power Supply/PSU (BP500U), two case 80mm
> case fans, Seagate Barracuda 7200.7 (ST380011A; 7200 RPM; 80 GB) HDD, an
> IDE Quantum Fireball Plus LM 15 GB HDD, Toshiba DVD-ROM SD-M1612 Rev. B
> 16X/48X ATAPI/IDE drive, Plextor PX-W1210 PlexWriter (12/10/32A; IDE),
> 3.5" disk drive, and an Intel InBusiness 10/100 (82559) NIC. Running
> 32-bit Debian (Linux) OS (Kernel v2.6.32-...-686).

Basically depends on your reliability needs. If computer downtime
is a problem, get an Enermax. They start at around $100. If you
take into account that you need to replace that Antec several times
in the lifetime of one Enermax, that is really cheap.

> In a few months, I will be upgrading my system to an old Intel Intel
> Core 2 Q8200 (quad-core; default clock speeds); Socket 775 LGA) with a
> Scythe Andy Master 120mm CPU cooler (SCASM-1000), MSI P43 NEO3-F
> (MSI-7514) motherboard (BIOS v2.3), etc. with the same mid-ATX case.

400W should still be plenty for that.

Arno
--
Arno Wagner, Dr. sc. techn., Dipl. Inform., CISSP -- Email: ar...@wagner.name
GnuPG: ID: 1E25338F FP: 0C30 5782 9D93 F785 E79C 0296 797F 6B50 1E25 338F
----
Cuddly UI's are the manifestation of wishful thinking. -- Dylan Evans

Ant

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Sep 10, 2010, 8:04:07 AM9/10/10
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Thanks Arno. I heard my fan a little noiser this morning. I had to tap
the PSU fan vent a few times to silent it, but yeah it is slowly getting
worse in terms of noises. :(
--
"What do ants and bees use for cattle?" --Tom

Ant

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Sep 10, 2010, 8:09:26 AM9/10/10
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I noticed something else... I think there are more chances of loud
noises if the weather is cooler (70F degrees in my room). When it was
hot/warmer (e.g., 80-90F degrees in my room), I didn't hear the loud
noises much. Maybe a coincident?


On 9/9/2010 5:25 AM PT, Ant typed:

"When the water rises the fish eat the ants, when the water falls the
ants eat the fish." --Thai Proverb

Arno

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Sep 10, 2010, 10:32:11 AM9/10/10
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In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant <a...@zimage.comant> wrote:
> I noticed something else... I think there are more chances of loud
> noises if the weather is cooler (70F degrees in my room). When it was
> hot/warmer (e.g., 80-90F degrees in my room), I didn't hear the loud
> noises much. Maybe a coincident?

The shot bearings have a resonance frequency that results from the
mechanical characteristics of the whole propellor assembly. If it gets
close in RPM to this frequency or a multiple thereof, it can go into
these vibrations. The temperature differences will have the FAN spin
at different temperatures it if it is temperture controlled.

But it does not matter. The bearing will get worse fast and the
opnly two options are a fan replacement (requires considerable
insight to get right) and a PSU replacement.

Arno

--

Ant

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Sep 11, 2010, 12:56:19 PM9/11/10
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On 9/10/2010 7:32 AM PT, Arno typed:

> In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant<a...@zimage.comant> wrote:
>> I noticed something else... I think there are more chances of loud
>> noises if the weather is cooler (70F degrees in my room). When it was
>> hot/warmer (e.g., 80-90F degrees in my room), I didn't hear the loud
>> noises much. Maybe a coincident?
>
> The shot bearings have a resonance frequency that results from the
> mechanical characteristics of the whole propellor assembly. If it gets
> close in RPM to this frequency or a multiple thereof, it can go into
> these vibrations. The temperature differences will have the FAN spin
> at different temperatures it if it is temperture controlled.

Inteesting. I didn't know PSUs were temperature related. I thought that
was for video cards and CPU. Can one control PSU fans manually with
software or CMOS like keep it at maximum speed at all time?
--
"If someone makes you angry, I think the thing to do is tie them down to
the ground, cover them in honey, and then release a swarm of killer ants
on them. That way, you can hit them over and over again and say, 'Hey!
I'm just trying to help!' and they can't really get mad at you." --R.M.
Weiner

Ant

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Sep 11, 2010, 1:08:59 PM9/11/10
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On 9/10/2010 7:32 AM PT, Arno typed:

>> I noticed something else... I think there are more chances of loud


>> noises if the weather is cooler (70F degrees in my room). When it was
>> hot/warmer (e.g., 80-90F degrees in my room), I didn't hear the loud
>> noises much. Maybe a coincident?
>
> The shot bearings have a resonance frequency that results from the
> mechanical characteristics of the whole propellor assembly. If it gets
> close in RPM to this frequency or a multiple thereof, it can go into
> these vibrations. The temperature differences will have the FAN spin
> at different temperatures it if it is temperture controlled.

Actually, how does one know if a PSU is temperature controlled? I never
really noticed if it is faster or slower from its audio (just the
annoying loud noises that come and go). I only hear them from stock fans
on CPUs and video cards. It doesn't seem like I can see temperature
readings from BIOS/CMOS and Linux's sensors command:

$ sensors -f
acpitz-virtual-0
Adapter: Virtual device
temp1: +71.2°F (crit = +206.2°F)

k8temp-pci-00c3
Adapter: PCI adapter
Core0 Temp: +105.8°F
Core1 Temp: +82.4°F

adt7473-i2c-4-2e (NVIDIA GeForce GT 8800 video card)
Adapter: NVIDIA i2c adapter
in1: +2.99 V (min = +2.94 V, max = +2.94 V)
+3.3V: +3.20 V (min = +4.31 V, max = +4.31 V)
fan1: 2683 RPM (min = 82 RPM)
fan2: 0 RPM (min = 82 RPM)
fan3: 0 RPM (min = 82 RPM) ALARM
fan4: 0 RPM (min = 82 RPM)
temp1: +161.6°F (low = +368.6°F, high = +368.6°F)
Board Temp: +145.4°F (low = +368.6°F, high = +368.6°F) ALARM
temp3: +159.8°F (low = +368.6°F, high = +368.6°F) ALARM
--
"Did the ant fall off the toilet seat because she was pissed off?" --unknown

Ant

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Sep 11, 2010, 1:09:29 PM9/11/10
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I forgot to mention that this PC is on 24/7. It is rarely powered down
except for repairs. I do reboot once in a while though. Maybe I should
try shutting down and powering on when the noises return? I doubt that
will do anything.


On 9/9/2010 5:25 AM PT, Ant typed:

> Hello.

"Everyone knows an ant can't move a rubber tree plant." --Motto of FTL
Foundation (in Isaac Asimov book)

Arno

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Sep 11, 2010, 5:14:16 PM9/11/10
to
In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant <a...@zimage.comant> wrote:
> On 9/10/2010 7:32 AM PT, Arno typed:

>> In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant<a...@zimage.comant> wrote:
>>> I noticed something else... I think there are more chances of loud
>>> noises if the weather is cooler (70F degrees in my room). When it was
>>> hot/warmer (e.g., 80-90F degrees in my room), I didn't hear the loud
>>> noises much. Maybe a coincident?
>>
>> The shot bearings have a resonance frequency that results from the
>> mechanical characteristics of the whole propellor assembly. If it gets
>> close in RPM to this frequency or a multiple thereof, it can go into
>> these vibrations. The temperature differences will have the FAN spin
>> at different temperatures it if it is temperture controlled.

> Inteesting. I didn't know PSUs were temperature related. I thought that
> was for video cards and CPU. Can one control PSU fans manually with
> software or CMOS like keep it at maximum speed at all time?

No. The regulation is completely PSU internal. I dod not like
the characteristic of mine and built a custom regulator, but that
is really the only way.

Arno

> --
> "If someone makes you angry, I think the thing to do is tie them down to
> the ground, cover them in honey, and then release a swarm of killer ants
> on them. That way, you can hit them over and over again and say, 'Hey!
> I'm just trying to help!' and they can't really get mad at you." --R.M.
> Weiner
> /\___/\ Phil./Ant @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
> / /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
> | |o o| |
> \ _ / If crediting, then use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link.
> ( ) If e-mailing, then axe ANT from its address if needed.
> Ant is currently not listening to any songs on this computer.

--

Arno

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Sep 11, 2010, 5:16:01 PM9/11/10
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In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant <a...@zimage.comant> wrote:
> On 9/10/2010 7:32 AM PT, Arno typed:

>>> I noticed something else... I think there are more chances of loud
>>> noises if the weather is cooler (70F degrees in my room). When it was
>>> hot/warmer (e.g., 80-90F degrees in my room), I didn't hear the loud
>>> noises much. Maybe a coincident?
>>
>> The shot bearings have a resonance frequency that results from the
>> mechanical characteristics of the whole propellor assembly. If it gets
>> close in RPM to this frequency or a multiple thereof, it can go into
>> these vibrations. The temperature differences will have the FAN spin
>> at different temperatures it if it is temperture controlled.

> Actually, how does one know if a PSU is temperature controlled? I never
> really noticed if it is faster or slower from its audio (just the
> annoying loud noises that come and go). I only hear them from stock fans
> on CPUs and video cards. It doesn't seem like I can see temperature
> readings from BIOS/CMOS and Linux's sensors command:

> $ sensors -f
> acpitz-virtual-0
> Adapter: Virtual device

> temp1: +71.2??F (crit = +206.2??F)

> k8temp-pci-00c3
> Adapter: PCI adapter
> Core0 Temp: +105.8??F
> Core1 Temp: +82.4??F

> adt7473-i2c-4-2e (NVIDIA GeForce GT 8800 video card)
> Adapter: NVIDIA i2c adapter
> in1: +2.99 V (min = +2.94 V, max = +2.94 V)
> +3.3V: +3.20 V (min = +4.31 V, max = +4.31 V)
> fan1: 2683 RPM (min = 82 RPM)
> fan2: 0 RPM (min = 82 RPM)
> fan3: 0 RPM (min = 82 RPM) ALARM
> fan4: 0 RPM (min = 82 RPM)

> temp1: +161.6??F (low = +368.6??F, high = +368.6??F)
> Board Temp: +145.4??F (low = +368.6??F, high = +368.6??F) ALARM
> temp3: +159.8??F (low = +368.6??F, high = +368.6??F) ALARM

I you PSU has a fan speed monitoring output and you plug that
into a monitored fan connector, you can monitor the PSU fan
speed. Practically all PSUs have fan speed regulation today.

Arno

Arno

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Sep 11, 2010, 5:17:37 PM9/11/10
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In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant <a...@zimage.comant> wrote:
> I forgot to mention that this PC is on 24/7. It is rarely powered down
> except for repairs. I do reboot once in a while though. Maybe I should
> try shutting down and powering on when the noises return? I doubt that
> will do anything.

Will not realy help. It will just return. The only fix is to get
a new fan, with or without attached new PSU. One a bearing is
shot, there really is no way to repair it except melting it down
and making a new one from the metal.

Arno

--

Ant

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Sep 12, 2010, 2:41:33 AM9/12/10
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On 9/11/2010 2:16 PM PT, Arno typed:

Ah thanks. I guess the technician didn't hook it up.
--
"An ant's nest could bring down a hill." --Japanese

Arno

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Sep 12, 2010, 5:32:52 AM9/12/10
to
In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant <a...@zimage.comant> wrote:

Looks like it.

Ant

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Sep 12, 2010, 2:58:51 PM9/12/10
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OK, I am researching on another PSU to replace the crappy eight months
old Antec PSU I have right now in my old Debian/Linux box (made noises
this morning and it is confirmed the fan since I stuck a plastic straw
in it and it stopped). I am going to get this one RMA soon before its
year, get something better that won't fail me easily, and sell the
Antec's RMA one.

How does a Seasonic Corsair HX450 sound? Am I reading correctly that
both SeaSonic and Corsair share the same PSU designs and Corsair has
longer warranty (five years)?

Again, here is my current old computer setup for a few more months: AMD

Athlon 64 X2 (dual core) 939 4600+ CPU (using a Thermaltake Silent Boost
K8 A1838 model), MSI K8N NEO4-F (MS-7125) motherboard (NVIDIA nForce4),
2.5 GB of RAM (one 1 GB + three 512 MB; use all four memory slots)
refurbished (RMA'ed twice!) EVGA GeForce 8800 GT (PCIE; NVIDIA), Enlight
7237-ATX mid-tower case; Antec Basiq 500 Watt ATX Power Supply/PSU
(BP500U), two case 80mm case fans, Seagate Barracuda 7200.7 (ST380011A;
7200 RPM; 80 GB) HDD, an IDE Quantum Fireball Plus LM 15 GB HDD, Toshiba
DVD-ROM SD-M1612 Rev. B 16X/48X ATAPI/IDE drive, Plextor PX-W1210
PlexWriter (12/10/32A; IDE), 3.5" disk drive, and an Intel InBusiness
10/100 (82559) NIC. Running 32-bit Debian (Linux) OS (Kernel
v2.6.32-...-686).

In a few months (most likely at the end of thies year), I will be

upgrading my system to an old Intel Intel Core 2 Q8200 (quad-core;
default clock speeds); Socket 775 LGA) with a Scythe Andy Master 120mm
CPU cooler (SCASM-1000), MSI P43 NEO3-F (MSI-7514) motherboard (BIOS
v2.3), etc. with the same mid-ATX case.

Thank you in advance. :)
--

At length, when they came to a (lowly) valley of ants, one of the ants
said: "O ye ants, get into your habitations, lest Solomon and his hosts
crush you (under foot) without knowing it." --Surah 27. The Ant, The
Ants, line 18


/\___/\ Phil./Ant @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
/ /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
| |o o| |
\ _ / If crediting, then use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link.
( ) If e-mailing, then axe ANT from its address if needed.

Ant is/was listening to a song on this computer: The Ting Tings - Hands
(Low Sunday Indie Fix)

Ant

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Sep 12, 2010, 3:30:54 PM9/12/10
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On 9/12/2010 2:32 AM PT, Arno typed:

Actually, I think I see it in CMOS after rebooting to it. I found out
recent Kernels did major changes with for sensor readings according to
http://www.lm-sensors.org/wiki/FAQ/Chapter3#Mysensorshavestoppedworkinginkernel2.6.31
... So bah to check in Linux/Debian, and I have to check.

Funny thing is that I turned off the PC, with its noisy PSU fan, for a
few seconds. I turned it on and it has been quiet so far... I am sure it
will be back again. I even checked the CMOS' readings for the three fans
(not sure which is which from two of them since one was CPU):

24xx-25xx
23xx-24xx
34xx-35xx

I will check again when the noises return.
--
"When an ant gets wings, it loses its head." --Bosnian Proverb

Ant

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Sep 12, 2010, 3:42:27 PM9/12/10
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On 9/11/2010 2:17 PM PT, Arno typed:

>> I forgot to mention that this PC is on 24/7. It is rarely powered down
>> except for repairs. I do reboot once in a while though. Maybe I should
>> try shutting down and powering on when the noises return? I doubt that
>> will do anything.
>
> Will not realy help. It will just return. The only fix is to get
> a new fan, with or without attached new PSU. One a bearing is
> shot, there really is no way to repair it except melting it down
> and making a new one from the metal.

It made noises again earlier this morning, so I tried a plastic straw
through the PSU fan's vent. The straw stopped PSU fan from spinning and
no noises. Sometimes releasing the straw made the fan quiet, but noises
came back again. I repeat and sometimes quiet. Right now, it is quiet.
Who knows how long that lasts. At least I can make it quieter faster
with a straw than tapping the PSU fan. :P I also checked to see if I
could get fan's RPM sensor reading. It is definitely not hooked up
according to Linux's lm_sensors results to ensure I am not confused with
video card's sensors (never saw zero or low values with the straw in the
fan).

I did notice wires (red, black, white, etc.) in front of the fan. I
didn't notice them before since it was dark and right now is brighter
with the sunlight and flashlight. I don't see any wires out of position
or anything through the vents.

OK, I am researching on another PSU to replace the crappy eight months
old Antec PSU I have right now in my old Debian/Linux box (made noises
this morning and it is confirmed the fan since I stuck a plastic straw
in it and it stopped). I am going to get this one RMA soon before its
year, get something better that won't fail me easily, and sell the
Antec's RMA one.

How does a Seasonic Corsair HX450 sound? Am I reading correctly that
both SeaSonic and Corsair share the same PSU designs and Corsair has
longer warranty (five years)?

Again, here is my current old computer setup for a few more months: AMD

Athlon 64 X2 (dual core) 939 4600+ CPU (using a Thermaltake Silent Boost
K8 A1838 model), MSI K8N NEO4-F (MS-7125) motherboard (NVIDIA nForce4),
2.5 GB of RAM (one 1 GB + three 512 MB; use all four memory slots)
refurbished (RMA'ed twice!) EVGA GeForce 8800 GT (PCIE; NVIDIA), Enlight
7237-ATX mid-tower case; Antec Basiq 500 Watt ATX Power Supply/PSU
(BP500U), two case 80mm case fans, Seagate Barracuda 7200.7 (ST380011A;
7200 RPM; 80 GB) HDD, an IDE Quantum Fireball Plus LM 15 GB HDD, Toshiba
DVD-ROM SD-M1612 Rev. B 16X/48X ATAPI/IDE drive, Plextor PX-W1210
PlexWriter (12/10/32A; IDE), 3.5" disk drive, and an Intel InBusiness
10/100 (82559) NIC. Running 32-bit Debian (Linux) OS (Kernel
v2.6.32-...-686).

In a few months (most likely at the end of thies year), I will be

upgrading my system to an old Intel Intel Core 2 Q8200 (quad-core;
default clock speeds); Socket 775 LGA) with a Scythe Andy Master 120mm
CPU cooler (SCASM-1000), MSI P43 NEO3-F (MSI-7514) motherboard (BIOS
v2.3), etc. with the same mid-ATX case.

Thank you in advance. :)


P.S. Sorry if this is a dupe. For some reason, my posts didn't show up
earlier. Weird. :(
--
"We may have no malevolent intentions toward an ant heap, but if we want
to build a house on the same site..." --Rendezvous With Rama

Arno

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Sep 13, 2010, 4:40:25 AM9/13/10
to
In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant <a...@zimage.comant> wrote:
> OK, I am researching on another PSU to replace the crappy eight months
> old Antec PSU I have right now in my old Debian/Linux box (made noises
> this morning and it is confirmed the fan since I stuck a plastic straw
> in it and it stopped). I am going to get this one RMA soon before its
> year, get something better that won't fail me easily, and sell the
> Antec's RMA one.

> How does a Seasonic Corsair HX450 sound? Am I reading correctly that
> both SeaSonic and Corsair share the same PSU designs and Corsair has
> longer warranty (five years)?

First, same design does not imply same fan. So a longer warranty
period may indicate a better fan. However, you should make sure that
the warranty actually covers the fan. If, for example, it does not
cover "normal wear and tear", then the fan bearings are not included.
THat said, 5 years warranty would be a strong indicator of a quality,
long-life fan being used and also other components (capacitors)
being higer quality.

Ant

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Sep 13, 2010, 9:22:07 AM9/13/10
to
On 9/13/2010 1:40 AM PT, Arno typed:

>> OK, I am researching on another PSU to replace the crappy eight months
>> old Antec PSU I have right now in my old Debian/Linux box (made noises
>> this morning and it is confirmed the fan since I stuck a plastic straw
>> in it and it stopped). I am going to get this one RMA soon before its
>> year, get something better that won't fail me easily, and sell the
>> Antec's RMA one.
>
>> How does a Seasonic Corsair HX450 sound? Am I reading correctly that
>> both SeaSonic and Corsair share the same PSU designs and Corsair has
>> longer warranty (five years)?
>
> First, same design does not imply same fan. So a longer warranty
> period may indicate a better fan. However, you should make sure that
> the warranty actually covers the fan. If, for example, it does not
> cover "normal wear and tear", then the fan bearings are not included.
> THat said, 5 years warranty would be a strong indicator of a quality,
> long-life fan being used and also other components (capacitors)
> being higer quality.

Thanks. Hmm, I wished there were easy to find information about their
parts being quality. Well, they have to be way better than Antec!

I did find http://whirlpool.net.au/wiki/PSU_Manufacturers :

"Basiq – FSP (Fortron Source)"

Ha, I had Fortron FSP650-80GLC PSU (650 watts) that died (5/14/2007 to
12/5/2009) and damaged my Linux/Debian box's hardwares before that Antec
Basiq PSU!

I have bad lucks with these Antec and Fortron/FSP PSUs according to my
http://alpha.zimage.com/~ant/antfarm/about/toys.html history! I am
avoiding these brands! :P
--
"I got this aunt... Carpenter ant." --Girl and Crow


/\___/\ Phil./Ant @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
/ /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
| |o o| |
\ _ / If crediting, then use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link.
( ) If e-mailing, then axe ANT from its address if needed.

Arno

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Sep 13, 2010, 3:49:24 PM9/13/10
to
In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant <a...@zimage.comant> wrote:
> On 9/13/2010 1:40 AM PT, Arno typed:
[...]

>> First, same design does not imply same fan. So a longer warranty
>> period may indicate a better fan. However, you should make sure that
>> the warranty actually covers the fan. If, for example, it does not
>> cover "normal wear and tear", then the fan bearings are not included.
>> THat said, 5 years warranty would be a strong indicator of a quality,
>> long-life fan being used and also other components (capacitors)
>> being higer quality.

> Thanks. Hmm, I wished there were easy to find information about their
> parts being quality. Well, they have to be way better than Antec!

> "Basiq ? FSP (Fortron Source)"

Interesting! Looks like Antec is buying from however is cheapest
for a specific design.

In other news, contrary to an earlier statement of mine, it seems
FSP also manufactures (and designs?) their own units. Not that
they are particularly good.

Also Seasonic and CWT do their own manufacuring, design sources
unknown.

> Ha, I had Fortron FSP650-80GLC PSU (650 watts) that died (5/14/2007 to
> 12/5/2009) and damaged my Linux/Debian box's hardwares before that Antec
> Basiq PSU!

I had one that died in a server after a power failure (24 CWT PSUs
did not suffer any damage).

> I have bad lucks with these Antec and Fortron/FSP PSUs according to my
> http://alpha.zimage.com/~ant/antfarm/about/toys.html history! I am
> avoiding these brands! :P

Hehe. Wise decision.

Ant

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Sep 14, 2010, 4:09:31 PM9/14/10
to
> > I have bad lucks with these Antec and Fortron/FSP PSUs according to my
> > http://alpha.zimage.com/~ant/antfarm/about/toys.html history! I am
> > avoiding these brands! :P

> Hehe. Wise decision.

Yeah, I might get another SeaSonic or a Corsair. Weird that my
problematic PSU is behaving, but weather was warmer lately but still
cool in the morning hours. The only thing different since Sunday's
morning was manually turning off PC for a few seconds and turning it
back on. Weird... I am sure its noises will be back. :P
--
Quote of the Week: "An ant can do more than an ox that is lying down." --unknown
/\___/\ Ant @ http://antfarm.home.dhs.org (Personal Web Site)


/ /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
| |o o| |

\ _ / Please nuke ANT if replying by e-mail. If crediting,
( ) then please kindly use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link.

Ant

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Sep 18, 2010, 1:41:48 AM9/18/10
to
On 9/12/2010 12:30 PM PT, Ant typed:

>>>> I you PSU has a fan speed monitoring output and you plug that
>>>> into a monitored fan connector, you can monitor the PSU fan
>>>> speed. Practically all PSUs have fan speed regulation today.
>>
>>> Ah thanks. I guess the technician didn't hook it up.
>>
>> Looks like it.
>

> Actually, I think I see it in CMOS after rebooting to it. I found out
> recent Kernels did major changes with for sensor readings according to
> http://www.lm-sensors.org/wiki/FAQ/Chapter3#Mysensorshavestoppedworkinginkernel2.6.31
> ... So bah to check in Linux/Debian, and I have to check.
>
> Funny thing is that I turned off the PC, with its noisy PSU fan, for a
> few seconds. I turned it on and it has been quiet so far... I am sure it
> will be back again. I even checked the CMOS' readings for the three fans
> (not sure which is which from two of them since one was CPU):
>
> 24xx-25xx
> 23xx-24xx
> 34xx-35xx
>
> I will check again when the noises return.

Checking the BIOS/CMOS' readings with the noisy fan and stopped fan
with a plastic straw saw no changes. So definitely not connected to
read. I was told this PSU doesn't and others don't even have sensor
readings. Which ones can do temperature readings then if connected?
--
"God is a mean kid sitting on an ant-hill with a magnifying glass, and
I'm the ant." --Bruce Nolan (Bruce Almighty movie)

Arno

unread,
Sep 18, 2010, 5:30:11 AM9/18/10
to
In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.misc Ant <a...@zimage.comant> wrote:
> On 9/12/2010 12:30 PM PT, Ant typed:

>>>>> I you PSU has a fan speed monitoring output and you plug that
>>>>> into a monitored fan connector, you can monitor the PSU fan
>>>>> speed. Practically all PSUs have fan speed regulation today.
>>>
>>>> Ah thanks. I guess the technician didn't hook it up.
>>>
>>> Looks like it.
>>
>> Actually, I think I see it in CMOS after rebooting to it. I found out
>> recent Kernels did major changes with for sensor readings according to
>> http://www.lm-sensors.org/wiki/FAQ/Chapter3#Mysensorshavestoppedworkinginkernel2.6.31
>> ... So bah to check in Linux/Debian, and I have to check.
>>
>> Funny thing is that I turned off the PC, with its noisy PSU fan, for a
>> few seconds. I turned it on and it has been quiet so far... I am sure it
>> will be back again. I even checked the CMOS' readings for the three fans
>> (not sure which is which from two of them since one was CPU):
>>
>> 24xx-25xx
>> 23xx-24xx
>> 34xx-35xx
>>
>> I will check again when the noises return.

> Checking the BIOS/CMOS' readings with the noisy fan and stopped fan
> with a plastic straw saw no changes. So definitely not connected to
> read. I was told this PSU doesn't and others don't even have sensor
> readings. Which ones can do temperature readings then if connected?

The PSU does not do it. There is an extra fan-like cable on
some PSUs, that you plug into a monitord fan socket on the
mainboard. This cable does not have the fan power line,
only ground and the impulse line used for measuring
fan speed. No normal PSU has an exported temperature
sensor reading, as there is no standard for it.

Ant

unread,
Sep 18, 2010, 9:59:21 AM9/18/10
to Arno
On 9/18/2010 2:30 AM PT, Arno typed:

>> Checking the BIOS/CMOS' readings with the noisy fan and stopped fan
>> with a plastic straw saw no changes. So definitely not connected to
>> read. I was told this PSU doesn't and others don't even have sensor
>> readings. Which ones can do temperature readings then if connected?
>
> The PSU does not do it. There is an extra fan-like cable on
> some PSUs, that you plug into a monitord fan socket on the
> mainboard. This cable does not have the fan power line,
> only ground and the impulse line used for measuring
> fan speed. No normal PSU has an exported temperature
> sensor reading, as there is no standard for it.

Oops, I meant to say fan sensor reading not temperature. It was late for
me last night (tired). :(
--
"Now I have you where I want you... where is my jar of Bull ants?" --unknown

Ant

unread,
Sep 18, 2010, 9:59:26 AM9/18/10
to
On 9/18/2010 2:30 AM PT, Arno typed:

>> Checking the BIOS/CMOS' readings with the noisy fan and stopped fan


>> with a plastic straw saw no changes. So definitely not connected to
>> read. I was told this PSU doesn't and others don't even have sensor
>> readings. Which ones can do temperature readings then if connected?
>
> The PSU does not do it. There is an extra fan-like cable on
> some PSUs, that you plug into a monitord fan socket on the
> mainboard. This cable does not have the fan power line,
> only ground and the impulse line used for measuring
> fan speed. No normal PSU has an exported temperature
> sensor reading, as there is no standard for it.

Oops, I meant to say fan sensor reading not temperature. It was late for

me last night (tired). :(
--
"Now I have you where I want you... where is my jar of Bull ants?" --unknown

anneno...@gmail.com

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Dec 7, 2013, 7:18:25 PM12/7/13
to
On Thursday, September 9, 2010 5:25:48 AM UTC-7, Ant wrote:
> Hello.A technician installed a new Antec Basiq 500 Watt ATX Power Supply/PSU (BP500U) on 1/23/2010 into my old PC to replace a dead previous, old PSU since I am not a computer hardware person.Lately, its PSU fan has been making loud noises. I have to hit/tap the PSU fan area to make it stop. This always doesn't work either. I noticed different its fan output, has noticeable changes in air output and vibrations, between its quietness and noises. It doesn't look dusty (can't open the PC case due to my physical disabilities, but can see the fan through the dark vents). My place does get dusty and can get very hot (almost 90F degrees in the heat waves) due to Los Angeles/L.A. weather. Is this normal for a less than eight months old PSU? Or is this Antec PSU brand/model just crap or am I just having a bad luck? Online, I saw mostly positive reviews. There were a few that mentioned loud fans, but not like mine. My old 600 watts SeaSonic S12 PSU, from 2006, still works. It seems like Antec is crap these days?If I do need to replace it when it gets worse or dies, which one should I get that is better and low cost? Or should I keep the same brand and model when RMA'ed Here is my old computer setup: AMD Athlon 64 X2 (dual core) 939 4600+ CPU (using a Thermaltake Silent Boost K8 A1838 model), MSI K8N NEO4-F (MS-7125) motherboard (NVIDIA nForce4), 2.5 GB of RAM (one 1 GB + three 512 MB; use all four memory slots) refurbished (RMA'ed twice!) EVGA GeForce 8800 GT (PCIE; NVIDIA), Enlight 7237-ATX mid-tower case; Antec Basiq 500 Watt ATX Power Supply/PSU (BP500U), two case 80mm case fans, Seagate Barracuda 7200.7 (ST380011A; 7200 RPM; 80 GB) HDD, an IDE Quantum Fireball Plus LM 15 GB HDD, Toshiba DVD-ROM SD-M1612 Rev. B 16X/48X ATAPI/IDE drive, Plextor PX-W1210 PlexWriter (12/10/32A; IDE), 3.5" disk drive, and an Intel InBusiness 10/100 (82559) NIC. Running 32-bit Debian (Linux) OS (Kernel v2.6.32-...-686).In a few months, I will be upgrading my system to an old Intel Intel Core 2 Q8200 (quad-core; default clock speeds); Socket 775 LGA) with a Scythe Andy Master 120mm CPU cooler (SCASM-1000), MSI P43 NEO3-F (MSI-7514) motherboard (BIOS v2.3), etc. with the same mid-ATX case.Thank you in advance. :)-- "He who cannot pick up an ant, and wants to pick up an elephant will some day see his folly." --African /\___/\ Phil./Ant @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site) / /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net| |o o| | \ _ / If crediting, then use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link. ( ) If e-mailing, then axe ANT from its address if needed. Ant is currently not listening to any songs on this computer.

Hi Ant ok so you can change it and spend allot of money on a good one or a cheap one again. I am sure I will get alot of flack over this but I personally dont have cheap power supplies go out...HOWEVER I do have cheap power supply fans go out. I just order a good replacement fan. They are very easy to replace and if you know any electronicially capable people it can be done easily. I just replaced one on a Antec Signature 850 Watt Power Supply Power Supply my neighbor was going to throw out. The new fan cost me $10.00 and has sealed double bearings. It took me 10 minutes to replace it and I then had a greatpower supply to upgrade my system with. Just look at the label on the center of the fan (generally motor side) and get online and google it. Youll find them just order it, remove the lid, cut fan wires (1 red 1 black) and splice the new fans wires to the old ones. Make sure to tie the wires so they cant get in the fan and put the lid back on. Your ready to go.
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