Info-IBMPC Digest V95 #177

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Nov 30, 1995, 3:00:00 AM11/30/95
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Info-IBMPC Digest Thu, 30 Nov 95 Volume 95 : Issue 177

Today's Editor:
Gregory Hicks - San Jose, CA <GHI...@arl.mil>

Today's Topics:
Re: Password ARJ 2.3 forgotten.....
Re: PCI or VLB?? (2 msgs)
Re: PCTools
Phone change/service outage
Problems making a disk bootable after running disk test
Re: problems with TCP/IP Configure
Re: Re secondary cache upgrade ?
Re: Restoring to previous service level (2 msgs)
Re: Now I'm ready to Install Warp on my Toshiba!!
Re: SB16 Sound Problems
Schulman's win95 web-page
Slow Windows load up (7 msgs)

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Oct 1995 22:22:43 SLT
From: Solomon Peachy <F13U001%SAKSU00...@vm.gmd.de>
Subject: Re: Password ARJ 2.3 forgotten.....

On Tue, 10 Oct 1995 08:53:14 +0100 Boogaart M van den said:
>We set our hope on...... you !!!
>
>Now I've got this huge ARJ-file, compressed with ARJ v2.3
>The file is 2 years old, and the password that should work DOES NOT.
>So it's probably another password, but I can't think of an
>appropriate one: they all don't work.
>I can guess the answer, as ARJ is an excellent program, but does
>anyone know about a way to 'cheat' on it ?
>
>I'm really the owner of it !!!
>
>Thanks in advance for any trouble or help in advance....
>And.....I've learned my lesson.....

Yes! Me to. I have a 5-meg ARJ 2.41a multi-volume archive that is
compressed with a password. I made a typo when entering it, but didn't
realise it until I had to decompress it.

The password was supposed to 4 letters long.

Can I be helped? I think I heard of a program which can crack PWDs for
ARJ and PKZIP, but I have yet to see it.

- Solomon

Solomon Leon Peachy Internet: f13...@saksu00.bitnet
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (f13u001%saksu00...@vtbit.cc.vt.edu)

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 1995 22:17:29 -0800
From: Greg Gibbs - The LAN Lubber <AN...@acad2.alaska.edu>
Subject: Re: PCI or VLB??

>Todd M. Felmly <tfe...@RIKER.NEOUCOM.EDU> wrote:
>>Going to buy a motherboard tomorrow and would like to know if I should get
>>a PCI bus or VL-BUS board? I have 6 EISA cards in my current system and
>>could get rid of 2 which I would switch to the new bus. That leaves me
>>with 4 EISA left. I am going to run an AMD 486 DX4 120 MHz processor FWIW
>>with no plans (at least now for a Pentium).
To which Kasey Chank <kas...@discopy.com> responded:
> Wait a minute! Are you saying you THINK you can reuse your EISA cards?
> If so, forget it. Maybe you can do that on the MOST EXPENSIVE Micronics
> EISA/VESA boards, but they're a little hard to find nowadays, with all
> the PCI stuff running around.

Take heart, Todd. We've got a pair of very nice Digital PRIORIS XL
Server 590's that are a PCI/EISA combo. Okay, so they're servers and
complete systems as opposed to a mobo you can pick up somewhere. All
I'm trying to get across is that if these exist, then someone's got to
be supplying these types of mobos. I would suggest a peak at
http://www.ronon.com/SBA/ which is a guide to computer vendors and
their web sites as a place to look for your new mobo. Good luck! -
g^2

Greg Gibbs University of Alaska Anchorage an...@orion.alaska.edu

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 5 Oct 1995 09:35:58 -0800
From: Greg Gibbs - The LAN Lubber <AN...@acad2.alaska.edu>
Subject: Re: PCI or VLB??

My sincerest apologies to all whom I have inconvenienced and annoyed by
making a typo in a recently posted URL. I wrote:

> I would suggest a peak at http://www.ronon.com/SBA/
> which is a guide to computer vendors and their web
> sites as a place to look for your new mobo.

The correct URL is http://www.ronin.com/SBA/

My thanks to the net super and pooper scooper (hi Dave!) for
unintentionally showing me the error of my ways (the cc: of your
message to the list included it - I'm on digest, so I don't get to see
all the list traffic right away. . .)

Again, I'm sorry for any trouble I've caused. - g^2
=
Greg Gibbs University of Alaska Anchorage an...@orion.alaska.edu

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 29 Sep 1995 17:28:49 -0400
From: "L. Chen" <am...@freenet.buffalo.edu>
Subject: Re: PCTools

>Thanks for all the advice on the web browser question. Now I need some
>help for a co-worker of mine. He just got a Gateway P5-133. It came
>with WFWG 3.11 installed. He installed MS Office and Wordperfect for
>Windows. When he asked me for help the Main Group consisted of File
>Manager and the rest of the group was MS Office items. I couldn't find
>any of the other standard items that are usually in Main Group. Also,
>the Accessories Group was nowhere to be found. I installed PCTools for
>Windows and restarted Windows as instructed and all I got was a gray
>screen with no Groups or Items ( completely blank). I've installed
>PCtools for Windows on 2 machines I work on with no problems at all.
>I'm considering re-installing WFWG. Any advice greatly appreciated.

The same thing happened on one of client's Pentium 60 computer. I was
trying to install Lotus 1-2-3. And as soon as I exit Window and
restart window, I get a gray screen and no groups or items.

In my case, it has to do with memory conflicts. To check whether this
is the case in your situation, boot up you computer from a diskett with
a "clean" config.sys and autoexec.bat -- i.e. only put in the lines
that are absolutely necessary to run windows (e.g. himem.sys) and
NOTHING ELSE. Then load Windows. If you get your Groups back, then it
is caused by memory conflict. And you'll have to identify that
conflict.

Let me know if this solve your Window's problem.

--
Lily Chen lvc...@mcimail.com am...@freenet.buffalo.edu

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 28 Sep 1995 21:42:30 -0400
From: snuf...@kew.com
Subject: Phone change/service outage

[Edited 30 Nov]

A reminder that we moved on September 30th, 1995.

kewgate and kendra were down from sometime after 6 PM Friday 9/29 until
perhaps as late as 6 PM Tuesday 10/3. Drew actually expected the
outage to be shorter, but there's the matter of some wire that needs to
be run in some VERY tight spaces, etc..

(We're also got a new staff member Sunday, Winnie the Paws. Winnie is
a seven week old canine, and she may distract from the electronics
installation, to say the least. Existing plush staff members, like
myself, are all moving to higher ground to be safe. I'm cute -- NOT
canine lunch!)

Kendra/Kewgate's new number will be 617-279-9816. The Kendra
Electronic Wonderworks voice line will also change, to 617-279-9812.
(The residence line is also changing, this was announced separately and
will not repeated here.)

In other news, 1.12p is moving along. We're mostly waiting for Drew to
cough up news installation instructions. Look for the release out,
with documents, in mid-October.

-- Your faithful furry servant, Ice Cream Money: PO Box 80144
Snuffles P. Bear Stoneham, MA 02180
Internet: snuf...@kew.com

Care for a Snickers Bar?

------------------------------

From: Pete Green <p...@nessie.mcc.ac.uk>
Subject: Problems making a disk bootable after running disk test
Date: 27 Sep 93 15:50:04 GMT

Is it possible that running a hard disk test program which performs a
destructive write/read test on all sectors could leave a disk in an
unbootable state after running FDISK and FORMAT C: /S ? If so, how
does this happen.

The test program is part of PCCHECK and FDISK, FORMAT from the MSDOS V5
installation disks.

The disk was eventually made bootable using Norton Tools.

Many thanks,
Peter Green.

Peter R. Green ------- Tel:+44 61 200 4738 ---- Fax:+44 61 200 4019
JANET: p...@uk.ac.mcc.nessie INTERNET: p...@nessie.mcc.ac.uk
--- #include <std.disclaimers> -----

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 27 Sep 1995 13:53:20 -0400
From: Keith Bennett <kben...@cpcug.org>
Subject: Re: problems with TCP/IP Configure

Brian W. Gould <Go...@agecon.wisc.edu> wrote:
>I want to set up someone to be able to ftp to my machine. I currently
>have two such inidividuals authorized. Now I can not delete any users
>or add any users to the Security page of the TCP/IP configure
>applications. Anyone else having this problem and how did you solve
>it. I am running WARP connect, red box.

Brian -

This is just a suggestion...the ftp users and passwords can be set
directly in the text file called trusers. This file is located in
\mptn\etc I believe. My understanding is that tcpcfg (and tcpipcfg in
TCP/IP 2.0) are merely front ends for modifying TCP/IP's text files
(hosts, services, users, setup.cmd, inetd.lst, and trusers, for example).

You can look at your existing entries to see the proper format. Or,
let me know if you have any problem.

- Keith

Keith Bennett Bennett Business Solutions, Inc.
Silver Spring, MD USA OS/2 & DOS Software Development
kben...@cpcug.org (301) 871-7696

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 28 Sep 1995 18:39:04 -0400
From: Jim Meagher <xl_...@shore1.intercom.net>
Subject: Re: Re secondary cache upgrade ?

At 10:01 AM 9/28/95 -0230, you wrote:
>Upgrading 256 cache to 512. Pent Mobo can handle up to 1G so no problem
>there.

Bill,

When I upgraded from 256 to 512 I had to change my TAG chip also.
After two days of exploratory learning (wink-wink, nudge-nudge) I
realized that cache ram is a very FINICKY device. My advice is:

A> ALWAYS consult your MoBo manual.
B> NEVER mix brands of chips.
c> Read the MoBo manual.
D> Talk to a real tech not a salesman.
E> Check the MoBo manual.


Jim Meagher

Micro Solutions Consulting Programming, Training, Installation,
xl_...@shore.intercom.net Network Administration and Service
Salisbury, MD 21802-1129 410-543-8996

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 30 Sep 1995 17:31:42 EDT
From: Bob Babcock <pep...@cfa0.harvard.edu>
Subject: Re: Restoring to previous service level

> Anyway, I need to restore the archived files and return to the previous
> syslevel. Is there a mechanized way to do this, other than manually
> unpacking the files and guessing where they go?

Yes, the service routine will undo the last fix. (But only the last
fix; you can't undo more than one level of fix.) As I recall, the
procedure was something like: after it has read the first fixpak disk
and displayed the list of products to be serviced, click on "change
product list" and select "archived products". You should then be able
to select "backout".

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 1 Oct 1995 13:11:40 GMT
From: "David W. Walker" <d...@world.std.com>
Subject: Re: Restoring to previous service level

joh...@Tyrell.Net wrote:
> I have installed FixPack 11, at the advise of IBM. However, since
> applying the fixpack, the VRPrompt diaolog box in VXRexx is messed up.
> On one of my machines, I had backed up the system, so I restored it
> and all is well again. However, on the other amchine, no backup. Yeh,
> I know. Anyway, I need to restore the archived files and return to
> the previous syslevel. Is there a mechanized way to do this, other
> than manually unpacking the files and guessing where they go?

If you installed the FixPack using IBM's "kicker" disk set (and I can't
imagine how else you might have done it), the "Service" program should
have asked you to specify an "archive" directory (and, if you had
installed any previous fixpack, a "backup" directory) where it could
store backups of the OS/2 system files that were being replaced.

If you run the "Service" program on the "kicker" disk again, when you
get to the screen that lists "products" to be serviced, there is a
button for "Change Product List". Click on that, and you can display a
list of the "archive" level (the original version of OS/2 that you
installed) and (if there was an earlier fixpack installed) the "backup"
level. In each case, the list has a "Backout" button. Click on that,
and the Service program will restore the original or the the last
previous fixpack level, using the files stored in the archive or backup
directory.

If, like many other users, you deleted those files to recover disk
space, you're out of luck.

--== David W. Walker :|: d...@world.std.com ==--
All the world's a stage and most of us are desperately unrehearsed.
-- Sean O'Casey --

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 29 Sep 1995 09:26:42 -0500
From: "C. Michael Whitney" <syd...@lightning.safb.af.mil>
Subject: Re: Re[2]: Now I'm ready to Install Warp on my Toshiba!!

On Fri, 29 Sep 1995, Chad Lumpkin wrote:

> You might want to check out Stardock's new Object Desktop package. It
> has built in compression as well as many enhancements for the WPS. I
> haven't tried it, it just came out, but from everything I hear it's
> worth the MSRP of $99 US (I don't know how much the other compression
> programs are but I'm sure they're at least $60 US). You can get more
> information at their website http://oeonline.com/~stardock/.

Wrong!! Obj. Desktop does NOT provide compression! What it DOES do is
add a LOT of functionality to your desktop, taking advantage of OS/2
object oriented PM. Among other things, it gives you a fully
customizable control center, that displays such things as CPU load and
HD space, memory free, and folder shortcuts as well as up to 16 virtual
desktops. A keyboard launchpad is provided, allowing you to set up
keys to activate programs, and a tab launchpad, that acts in a similar
fashion to the Warp Launchpad...but OD's allows you to group your
programs any way you want to, by tabs (I have Active Tasks,
Productivity, Utilities, Games, & Communications set up on mine).

What you're probably confusing for compression is OD's cacheing
abilities. One allows OD to read and store in memory folders that you
specify, allowing for instantaneous openings of those folders. Another
useful feature is Browse mode, with Read Behind...here OD takes a guess
at what the files are when you open a folder, and puts up the default
icons for those files...it will then read behind after doing that, and
update any special icons. It allows for fast display of folders.

Yet another spiffy feature is the ability to treat file archives as if
they were folders...zip, arc, zoo, lzh files are all supported. You
can read text, and even run jobs from these compressed files.

I've been an OD beta tester since they opened it up, and it's a great
package. It should be released GA tomorrow. :)

C. Michael Whitney - USAFETAC/SYS - SAS Applications |
syd...@lightning.safb.af.mil | Get Warped!!!
cm...@basenet.net |
** Team OS/2 ** |

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 1995 11:33:52 +0100
From: Francisco Mendez Losada <in3...@unica.udc.es>
Subject: Re: SB16 Sound Problems

On Tue, 3 Oct 1995, Jay Whitman wrote:

> I have a SoundBlaster 16 board on my PC (486 DX2 66Mhz with 24 Meg
> RAM) and I've been having trouble with the sound going away every once
> in a while but never really knew why or when. I just discovered that
> it happens whenever I run a DOS application. Here's the part that
> deals with sound in my AUTOEXEC.BAT file:
>
> SET BLASTER=A220 I10 D1 H7 P330 T6
> SET SOUND=C:\SB16
> SET MIDI=SYNTH:1 MAP:E
> C:\SB16\DIAGNOSE /S
> C:\SB16\SB16SET /P /Q
>
> Here's my CONFIG.SYS statements that go with my SB16 board:
>
> DEVICE=C:\MMOS2\SB16D2.SYS 1 1 7 10 220 4 330 /N:SBAUD1$
> DEVICE=C:\MMOS2\AUDIOVDD.SYS SBAUD1$
There two things:

-Most of DOS games don't like too much to use IRQ #10, that's what
you're saying with SET BLASTER=... I10 ...

-In my **very** personal opinion, the best thing you can do to have
sound in DOS games is to NOT tell OS/2 that you have a sound card. Let
the programs to interact directly with sound card (this works fine for
me).

In the other hand, do you really need those **strange** system sounds
in OS/2???. I think that a serious operating system should not use that
resource consuming "flowers".

Summarizing:
*delete those DEVICE lines in your config.sys
*let your DOS autoexec.bat in peace
*in the DOS setting notebook, order OS/2 to load the drivers that your
sound card needs (i'm referring to the DOS drivers that came with the
board)
*if you want to release conventional memory, don't do what was stated
in the previous point and insert that drivers in your config.sys.
Something like DEVICEHIGH=c:/sb16/ctmsys.sys ...
and DEVICEHIGH=c:/sb16/ccd.sys ...
DO NOT COPY THE LINES THAT REFER TO THE CD_ROM DRIVE (IF YOU HAVE ONE)

Ok, now crucifix me!! :)

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 30 Sep 1995 00:40:36 EDT
From: Felmon Davis <dav...@gar.union.edu>
Subject: Schulman's win95 web-page

Hello.

Andrew Schulman has a web page in which he is publishing his ongoing
researches into window95's underpinnings including some of the programs
he uses for monitoring and such. Also there's some stuff on 'prank
virus' and on 'Undocumented NT.'

If you're interested, this page can be reached by WWW at:

ftp://ftp.ora.com/pub/examples/windows/win95.update/schulman.html

Yours,
Felmon

Felmon John Davis
dav...@gar.union.edu
dav...@unvax.union.edu
Union College
Schenectady, NY

meine meinung ist mir

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 1995 09:37:47 -0400
From: "Todd M. Felmly" <tfe...@riker.neoucom.edu>
Subject: Slow Windows load up

I just replace my old 486 SLC2 motherboard w/4 megs of ram to a 486 SX
w/12 megs of ram VL-Bus motherboard. The 486SX is running at 38 MHz
and it seems to be just as slow when loading Windows up as it did
before I made the change. It seems to be slow from the time the big
Windows logo appears to the time where you can actually click on
something in program manager. I have a Compaq notebook that has almost
the same hardware (486DX (not sx) and 12 megs of ram) that loads
Windows in a blink.

What would be causing the delay here? What is Windows loading up when
the logo appears? FWIW - I have a VL-Bus controller card and am still
using my old 16 bit video card with 512k memory. The notebook OTOH has
a vl-bus video also. Would the slow video card be slowing the whole
system down???

Thanks!
Todd

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 1995 17:26:11 -0400
From: Jim Meagher <xl_...@shore1.intercom.net>
Subject: Re: Slow Windows load up

At 09:37 AM 10/4/95 -0400, you wrote:
>I just replace my old 486 SLC2 motherboard w/4 megs of ram to a 486 SX
>w/12 megs of ram VL-Bus motherboard. The 486SX is running at 38 MHz and
>it seems to be just as slow when loading Windows up as it did before I
>made the change. It seems to be slow from the time the big Windows logo
>appears to the time where you can actually click on something in program
>manager. I have a Compaq notebook that has almost the same hardware
>(486DX (not sx) and 12 megs of ram) that loads Windows in a blink.
>
>What would be causing the delay here? What is Windows loading up when the
>logo appears?

Todd,

A new cpu and more memory won't change the access speed of the disk
drive. The disk drive is the biggest bottleneck in any system.

Why does the notebook load faster than the big system? That depends on
the disk drive performance and also how the software is configured.

Do both machines use 32 bit access? Do both machines load the same
number of fonts? Do both machines have the same items in the startup
group? What (if anything) is listed in the system.ini files load= or
run= lines. What are the differences in the config.sys and
autoexec.bat files on the two machines.

To see what Windows is loading when the Logo appears, do this:
run windows using the command WIN /B

The /B tells windows to create a text file called
c:\windows\bootlog.txt That file will show you EVERYTHING that windows
does during it's bootup process. BTW, this will make windows boot even
slower because it has to keep writing info to the text file while it
starts up.

Jim Meagher

Micro Solutions Consulting Programming, Training, Installation,
xl_...@shore.intercom.net Network Administration and Service
Salisbury, MD 21802-1129 410-543-8996

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 1995 23:42:55 -0500
From: "Paul A. Schmid" <pse...@starnetinc.com>
Subject: Re: Slow Windows load up

**** Please ignore spuriuos characters in this message. As we IS people =
like to say:
**** "We're working on it..."
****

> What would be causing the delay here? What is Windows loading up when =
the logo appears?

Todd,
Check out your Virtual Memory settings. The longest delays
I've seen = with starting Windows are when it's creating some enormous
temporary = swap file. (sometimes up to 25 MB) Regardless of the
size, you = definitely want that swap file to be permanent. I can't
recall the = ideal sizes but 8-10 MB is generally pretty good for most
apps. and = memory configurations.

Good luck,
Paul.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 5 Oct 1995 17:56:19 -0700
From: Keith Meidling <meid...@ix.netcom.com>
Subject: Re: Slow Windows load up

>> What would be causing the delay here? What is Windows loading up when
the logo appears?

> Check out your Virtual Memory settings. The longest delays
>I've seen with starting Windows are when it's creating some enormous
>temporary swap file. (sometimes up to 25 MB) Regardless of the size,
>you definitely want that swap file to be permanent. I can't recall the
>ideal sizes but 8-10 MB is generally pretty good for most apps. and
>memory configurations.

Here is a message that I came across from Tipsheet (Great listserv that
went down), it tells a little on how windows choses the swap file size.
A good size to make it, I have been told, is to make the swap file the
size of the ram... Here is what windows does...

---------------

As per a document given out at a free Microsoft workshop. The default
size of the swap file is generated by a simple algorithm that selects
the smallest from the following criteria: 1) one-half of the remaining
free hard disk space, 2) the largest contiguous block of free harddisk
space, and 3) three times the amount of physical RAM on the system.
However they recommended a "5120k" permanent one.

Keith Meidling
meid...@ix.netcom.com

If you can smile when things go wrong,
you have someone in mind to blame.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 5 Oct 1995 18:35:57 -0400
From: Jim Meagher <xl_...@shore.intercom.net>
Subject: Re: Slow Windows load up

At 08:36 AM 10/5/95 -0400, you wrote:
>
>I do think that the desktop is loading much more though - I will use the
>/b switch and find out what is loading.
>

Todd,

The biggest time hog in loading windows is the fonts. Seems like every
program you install adds one or two more fonts to the system. Windows
has to spend a lot of time (and resources) just loading and then
keeping track of all those extra fonts.

When people bring me a machine and complain about slow speed or limited
resources, stripping out the unused fonts is one of the first things I
do.

Try it. You'll be amazed at the difference that simple little step can
make. One word of caution though::: Make sure you clear the check box
that asks if you want to delete the font from your disk!

Jim Meagher

Micro Solutions Consulting Programming, Training, Installation,
xl_...@shore.intercom.net Network Administration and Service
Salisbury, MD 21802-1129 410-543-8996

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 5 Oct 1995 22:54:19 -0400
From: Jim Meagher <xl_...@shore1.intercom.net>
Subject: Re: Slow Windows load up

At 05:56 PM 10/5/95 -0700, you wrote:
>
>Here is a message that I came across from Tipsheet (Great listserv that went
>down), it tells a little on how windows choses the swap file size. A good
>size to make it, I have been told, is to make the swap file the size of the
>ram... Here is what windows does...
>

Nooo, not exactly -- but you were close. Here is the actual white
paper from MS explaining how it determines swapfile sizes.

***********
PSS ID Number: Q83968
Article last modified on 04-02-1994
PSS database name: W_WIN3
3.10 3.11
WINDOWS

The information in this article applies to:
- Microsoft Windows operating system versions 3.1, 3.11
- Microsoft Windows for Workgroups versions 3.1, 3.11

SUMMARY
=======
This article discusses how the Microsoft Windows operating system
version 3.1 determines the file size to recommend for swap files.

MORE INFORMATION
================
Temporary Swap File
-------------------

1.Q. What is the temporary swap file recommended maximum size?

A. It is four times the physical RAM in the computer, rounded to the
next 4 megabytes (MB). For example, if you have 3 MB of free XMS
memory, you can create 16 MB of virtual memory ([3 MB * 4] + 4MB = 16
MB). Four is the default value for the SYSTEM.INI [386Enh] switch
PageOverCommit=.

The recommended maximum size is also limited by the "50 percent
free hard drive space" rule (that is, a swap file cannot take more than
50 percent of the available, usable hard drive space [compressed or
stacked hard drive space is not considered usable]). Whichever limit
is reached first establishes the maximum size.

2.Q. When I set a temporary swap file to a size larger than the
maximum recommended size, the following error message is displayed.
What does this message mean?

Windows will not use more than the virtual memory specified by
the Recommended Size. Are you sure you want to create a larger
swap file?

A. WIN386.EXE creates the temporary swap file at run time, and the
file grows as necessary; the swap-file functionality only controls the
maximum size allowable. You can never exceed 50 percent of the free
hard disk space or four times the amount of physical RAM.

Permanent Swap File
-------------------

3.Q. When I set a permanent swap file to a size larger than the
recommended maximum size, Windows forces the setting back to the
recommended maximum size, even when plenty of free hard drive space
exists. When this occurs, the following message is displayed. What does
this message mean?

The number you specified is too large. The number currently
displayed is the largest you can specify.

A. When Windows sets up a permanent swap file, free and contiguous
hard drive space limits the recommended maximum size. A permanent swap
file must be located on unfragmented space; therefore, even if there is
plenty of disk space, the swap file is limited by available space that
is fragmented.

If you have an disk-optimization program, such as Speedisk by Norton
Utilities or Compress by PC Tools, you can use it to make more of the
free hard drive space contiguous and usable for a permanent swap file.

NOTE: The maximum size limitations described in the first answer apply
in addition to the required unfragmented disk space.

NOTE: These utilities should not be run from Windows and should not be
run if you are using a disk cache. For more information, consult the
manual for the utility you are using.

Additional reference words: 3.10 unfragment defragment swapfile

Copyright Microsoft Corporation 1994.

Jim Meagher

Micro Solutions Consulting Programming, Training, Installation,
xl_...@shore.intercom.net Network Administration and Service
Salisbury, MD 21802-1129 410-543-8996

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Oct 1995 22:45:33 -0230
From: Bill Luby <bl...@calvin.stemnet.nf.ca>
Subject: Re: Slow Windows load up

Andy, also check that somebody hasn't loaded 1,001 fonts. Tends to slow
things down a bit....

Bill Luby
Tutuit Jewellery
2 Grand Street
Tors Cove, NF
Canada, A0A 4A0
(709) 334 2630
bl...@calvin.stemnet.nf.ca
"Didn't that red wire go over there?"

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End of Info-IBMPC Digest V95 #177

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