U of Texas C Compiler for CDC Cyber or 6600

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thunt...@yahoo.com.au

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Jan 8, 2007, 11:59:28 PM1/8/07
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Has anyone still got a copy of the U of Texas C Compiler for the CDC
CYBER or 6600? Any of the following media would be useful: ASCII file,
1/2" tape, card deck or listing.

Does anyone know of any other C compilers capable of creating code for
the CDC CYBER or 6600?

Could you please email to "cdctom at yahoo dot com dot au" if you can
help.

Thanks

Tom Hunter

Scott Dorsey

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Jan 9, 2007, 10:03:02 AM1/9/07
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<thunt...@yahoo.com.au> wrote:
>Has anyone still got a copy of the U of Texas C Compiler for the CDC
>CYBER or 6600? Any of the following media would be useful: ASCII file,
>1/2" tape, card deck or listing.
>
>Does anyone know of any other C compilers capable of creating code for
>the CDC CYBER or 6600?

I believe there was an official CDC C compiler for NOS, at least in the
late eighties. I recall it being pretty awful but I think I still have
some of the user documentation for it.

If you're willing to go into the NOS/VE era, you have even more options.
And there was VE/VX about which the less said the better.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Walter Spector

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Jan 10, 2007, 2:01:38 AM1/10/07
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Scott Dorsey wrote:
> I believe there was an official CDC C compiler for NOS, at least in the
> late eighties. I recall it being pretty awful but I think I still have
> some of the user documentation for it.

Even documentation would help - especially if it has details of
things like the calling sequence and char pointer format...

> If you're willing to go into the NOS/VE era, you have even more options.
> And there was VE/VX about which the less said the better.

We are looking for 60 bit stuff.

Thanks!

Walt

Randy Howard

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Jan 10, 2007, 5:59:38 AM1/10/07
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On Mon, 8 Jan 2007 22:59:28 -0600, thunt...@yahoo.com.au wrote
(in article <1168318768....@i15g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>):

> Has anyone still got a copy of the U of Texas C Compiler for the CDC
> CYBER or 6600?

Whoa. Talk about a trip down memory lane. I used a CDC dual cyber in
several lower division CS courses once upon a time. do you actually
have an operational one of these up and running?

> Does anyone know of any other C compilers capable of creating code for
> the CDC CYBER or 6600?

For the life of me I can't remember what C compiler was used back then.
Most of the code development at that level back then was in Pascal, or
Fortran. I do recall mnf (Minnesota Fortran) was the compiler for the
latter.


--
Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR)
"The power of accurate observation is called cynicism by those
who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw

Eugene Miya

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Jan 10, 2007, 10:53:05 AM1/10/07
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In article <45A48F51...@earthlink.net>,

Walter Spector <w6ws_xt...@earthlink.net> wrote:
>Scott Dorsey wrote:
>> I believe there was an official CDC C compiler for NOS, at least in the
>> late eighties. I recall it being pretty awful but I think I still have
>> some of the user documentation for it.
>
>Even documentation would help - especially if it has details of
>things like the calling sequence and char pointer format...

Make certain to get Al Kossow to scan it.

>> If you're willing to go into the NOS/VE era, you have even more options.
>> And there was VE/VX about which the less said the better.
>
>We are looking for 60 bit stuff.

Try to locate Rob Peglar on the net.

He's out there.

--

Eugene Miya

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Jan 10, 2007, 10:56:36 AM1/10/07
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In article <0001HW.C1CA2390...@news.verizon.net>,

Randy Howard <randy...@FOOverizonBAR.net> wrote:
>On Mon, 8 Jan 2007 22:59:28 -0600, thunt...@yahoo.com.au wrote
>(in article <1168318768....@i15g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>):
>> Has anyone still got a copy of the U of Texas C Compiler for the CDC
>> CYBER or 6600?
>
>Whoa. Talk about a trip down memory lane. I used a CDC dual cyber in
>several lower division CS courses once upon a time. do you actually
>have an operational one of these up and running?

There are still running Cybers around.

>> Does anyone know of any other C compilers capable of creating code for
>> the CDC CYBER or 6600?
>
>For the life of me I can't remember what C compiler was used back then.
> Most of the code development at that level back then was in Pascal, or
>Fortran. I do recall mnf (Minnesota Fortran) was the compiler for the
>latter.

No one smart would have started writing a front end from scratch.
They would have bootstrapped one from the pcc and then written a code
generator and then improved something. Even Andy's work at UMN on the
Pascal compiler started on the p4 compiler front end.

>"The power of accurate observation is called cynicism by those
> who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw

Amusing. Done well enough I still have the last (and final) batch of
Resident Cycnic tee shirts.

--

Tim McCaffrey

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Jan 10, 2007, 1:44:29 PM1/10/07
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In article <1168318768....@i15g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
thunt...@yahoo.com.au says...
A professor at Central Michigan University ported Small-C to the CDC
circa 1982/83. I (briefly) tried porting it to our system, but it was
just a little too primitive to bother with (IMO), and it was designed to
be used under NOS (we more-or-less had NOS/BE), which added a fair amount
of grief to the porting process.

If I recall, I think it stored one character per word.

- Tim

Peter Flass

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Jan 10, 2007, 6:04:35 PM1/10/07
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Tim McCaffrey wrote:

> In article <1168318768....@i15g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> thunt...@yahoo.com.au says...
>
>>Has anyone still got a copy of the U of Texas C Compiler for the CDC
>>CYBER or 6600? Any of the following media would be useful: ASCII file,
>>1/2" tape, card deck or listing.
>>
>>Does anyone know of any other C compilers capable of creating code for
>>the CDC CYBER or 6600?
>>
>>Could you please email to "cdctom at yahoo dot com dot au" if you can
>>help.
>>
>>Thanks
>>
>>Tom Hunter
>>
>
> A professor at Central Michigan University ported Small-C to the CDC
> circa 1982/83. I (briefly) tried porting it to our system, but it was
> just a little too primitive to bother with (IMO),

I played around with small-C also, at one time, and came to the same
conclusion. I don't think it could have been extended enough to be
useful - it would have been easier to start from scratch.

CBFalconer

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Jan 10, 2007, 9:17:51 PM1/10/07
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Eugene Miya wrote:
>
... snip ...

>
> No one smart would have started writing a front end from scratch.
> They would have bootstrapped one from the pcc and then written a
> code generator and then improved something. Even Andy's work at
> UMN on the Pascal compiler started on the p4 compiler front end.

As did my PascalP. Still available in executable form on my site.

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

Randy Howard

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Jan 10, 2007, 9:33:37 PM1/10/07
to
On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 09:56:36 -0600, Eugene Miya wrote
(in article <45a51ac4$1@darkstar>):

> In article <0001HW.C1CA2390...@news.verizon.net>,
> Randy Howard <randy...@FOOverizonBAR.net> wrote:
>> On Mon, 8 Jan 2007 22:59:28 -0600, thunt...@yahoo.com.au wrote
>> (in article <1168318768....@i15g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>):
>>> Has anyone still got a copy of the U of Texas C Compiler for the CDC
>>> CYBER or 6600?
>>
>> Whoa. Talk about a trip down memory lane. I used a CDC dual cyber in
>> several lower division CS courses once upon a time. do you actually
>> have an operational one of these up and running?
>
> There are still running Cybers around.

That's good to know. That was the first system I ever used that would
have like 300 people on it during the day. At those times it got
rather sluggish, but if you stayed up late enough at night, you might
have it almost all to yourself, and then it really flew.

During the daytime, it was faster to compile Pascal code on 4.77 PC
running Turbo Pascal, to get it pretty much working, then upload
(xmodem or something iirc) to the cyber late at night. What was a
several minute compile on the PC at the best of times would happen
almost before your hand came off the enter key late at night when it
was mostly idle. It would be interesting to have access to one again,
if only for a few hours.

>>> Does anyone know of any other C compilers capable of creating code for
>>> the CDC CYBER or 6600?
>>
>> For the life of me I can't remember what C compiler was used back then.
>> Most of the code development at that level back then was in Pascal, or
>> Fortran. I do recall mnf (Minnesota Fortran) was the compiler for the
>> latter.
>
> No one smart would have started writing a front end from scratch.

If I wasn't clear, I meant the code development at the course level I
was in was mainly pascal and fortran, not compiler development for the
Cyber itself. Data structures, numerical analysis and the like. I can
see how it could have been worded much better.

> They would have bootstrapped one from the pcc and then written a code
> generator and then improved something. Even Andy's work at UMN on the
> Pascal compiler started on the p4 compiler front end.

I don't doubt that at all.


--
Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR)

Dave Bloodgood

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Jan 11, 2007, 8:41:23 AM1/11/07
to
I have fond memories of the dual 6500/600 at Purdue. In 1978, I graduated
and took a job at TRW in Redondo Beach, who
had a 7600, which didnt work as well as the Purdue setup,.

I have searched for any archives of the PROCSY ( Purdue Remote Online
Computing SYstem I think ) and the Purdue
"Dual Mace" OS, to no avail. It would be a lot of fun to boot one of these
up on the desk top cyber and relive my past.

Does any one know if these are out there somewhere ?

Dave


<thunt...@yahoo.com.au> wrote in message
news:1168318768....@i15g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

Eugene Miya

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Jan 11, 2007, 11:24:51 AM1/11/07
to
In article <45A59E4F...@yahoo.com>,
CBFalconer <cbfal...@maineline.net> wrote:

>Eugene Miya wrote:
>> No one smart would have started writing a front end from scratch.
>> They would have bootstrapped one ...

>> UMN on the Pascal compiler started on the p4 compiler front end.
>
>As did my PascalP. Still available in executable form on my site.

Shows that you were smart Chuck.

However an ex-CDC coworker was quoted in Datamation as saying
If it ain't source, it ain't software. Alas Dave is no longer with us.
;^)
--

Eugene Miya

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Jan 11, 2007, 11:32:46 AM1/11/07
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>>>> CYBER or 6600?
On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 09:56:36 -0600, Eugene Miya wrote
(in article <45a51ac4$1@darkstar>):
>> There are still running Cybers around.

In article <0001HW.C1CAFE7A...@news.verizon.net>,


Randy Howard <randy...@FOOverizonBAR.net> wrote:
>That's good to know.

I have special request letters for CHM, but it's up to the USAF and
other agencies to surplus them, scrub them, etc. I have to leave it up
to you guys to monitor and watch for availability. I have a full plate
of machines the CHM wants. And I have come within weeks of missing
examples because of neglect.

>> No one smart would have started writing a front end from scratch.
>
>If I wasn't clear, I meant the code development at the course level I
>was in was mainly pascal and fortran, not compiler development for the
>Cyber itself. Data structures, numerical analysis and the like. I can
>see how it could have been worded much better.
>
>> They would have bootstrapped one from the pcc and then written a code
>> generator and then improved something. Even Andy's work at UMN on the
>> Pascal compiler started on the p4 compiler front end.
>
>I don't doubt that at all.

You can't tell with the CDC crowd.
It's hard to find EOS developers (I don't want to bug Neil).
And I seriously doubt that any of that code exists.
And I got and have the last of the cryostats.
Not that we'll ever get a 10 running again.

--

Larry__Weiss

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Jan 11, 2007, 3:30:44 PM1/11/07
to
Dave Bloodgood wrote:
> I have fond memories of the dual 6500/600 at Purdue. In 1978, I graduated
> and took a job at TRW in Redondo Beach, who
> had a 7600, which didnt work as well as the Purdue setup,.
>

That's still how I feel about UT's CDC 6600 in the early 1970's in
Austin. I really felt that that system was fast!

My exact memories are fading regarding just how fast it was, but
I don't recall being aggravated by waiting around at a TTY for
a response. Of course that was after you got the operators to
load your files from tape to get the day started.

- Larry

Douglas A. Gwyn

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Jan 12, 2007, 8:10:03 PM1/12/07
to
Eugene Miya wrote:
> Make certain to get Al Kossow to scan it [the documentation].

Also, please immediately make an image of the whole tape,
in TAP format (same format as used by SIMH) and burn that
onto CD-ROM for archival backup. (Yes, the CD-ROMs also
need to be periodically copied.) Many old magtapes cannot
be read more than once, if that much, without losing the
data forever, so the first pass needs to capture it all.

Douglas H. Quebbeman

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Feb 8, 2007, 2:04:56 PM2/8/07
to
Dave Bloodgood wrote:
> I have fond memories of the dual 6500/600 at Purdue. In 1978, I
> graduated and took a job at TRW in Redondo Beach, who
> had a 7600, which didnt work as well as the Purdue setup,.
>
> I have searched for any archives of the PROCSY ( Purdue Remote Online
> Computing SYstem I think ) and the Purdue
> "Dual Mace" OS, to no avail. It would be a lot of fun to boot one of
> these up on the desk top cyber and relive my past.
>
> Does any one know if these are out there somewhere ?

Sadly, I doubt that a Dual-MACE tape will surface. We can keep hoping.

I managed to preserve some documentation. A lot of scraping of mold has
been involved. I have:

The CDC 6500 and the MACE System, L0_CDCMACE, 2/73
MACE System Loader, L0_LOADER 1/773
Users' Guide to LIBEDIT, V0_LIBEDIT, 2/71

Those are in PDF format.

Scanned, but Not yet Ready for Prime Time:

PROCSY: Purdue Remote Online Console SYstem, 10/73
A Beginner's Guide to PIRATE, L0_PIRATE, 10/73
PUFFT Users' Guide, L0_PUFFT, 5/74, Michael Shapiro

Manuals for DIPL, SPIRAL, and several other things are in
pretty bad shape.

I also scanned some dayfiles from job output, including one
with an Exchange Package...

My normal hosting mechanism's down, but I can throw something
together, or, just e-mail you these things one at a time, if you're
interested...

Regards,
-doug q


Rich Ragan

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Feb 8, 2007, 11:32:51 PM2/8/07
to
Ah, memories. I got to Purdue just as the 6500 did. It was thought
that they were going to get an IBM 360 Model xxx (don't recall which)
but CDC prevailed at the end. What a treat because I was coming from
FSU which had a 6400 and I knew all about it so it was easy to just
pick up at Purdue where I left off.

I was there with Michael Shapiro and the 7094-II that ran PUFFT was
still around. Michael signed my "draft" copy of the Snobol 4 book that
was being used for a class. It's still around the house. I saw him a
few years ago at a Purdueite get together in LA. His health was not
the greatest but we revisited a lot of old memories and good times. I
may have a MACE document or two kicking around. No tapes though.

Cheers, Richard Ragan

Dave Pitts

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Feb 9, 2007, 9:45:37 AM2/9/07
to
Rich Ragan wrote:

> Ah, memories. I got to Purdue just as the 6500 did. It was thought
> that they were going to get an IBM 360 Model xxx (don't recall which)
> but CDC prevailed at the end. What a treat because I was coming from
> FSU which had a 6400 and I knew all about it so it was easy to just
> pick up at Purdue where I left off.
>
> I was there with Michael Shapiro and the 7094-II that ran PUFFT was
> still around. Michael signed my


A tape or listing of PUFFT would be cool. With the 7094 simulators
running about we could revive it.
I used to have a listing of the PUFFT system (I was trying to make it
work on ISU's 7090); but, it has
gotten lost over the years.


--
Dave Pitts PULLMAN: Travel and sleep in safety and comfort.
dpi...@cozx.com My other RV IS a Pullman (Colorado Pine).
http://www.cozx.com/~dpitts

Douglas H. Quebbeman

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Feb 12, 2007, 8:21:27 AM2/12/07
to
Dave Pitts wrote:
> Rich Ragan wrote:
>
>> Ah, memories. I got to Purdue just as the 6500 did. It was thought
>> that they were going to get an IBM 360 Model xxx (don't recall which)
>> but CDC prevailed at the end. What a treat because I was coming from
>> FSU which had a 6400 and I knew all about it so it was easy to just
>> pick up at Purdue where I left off.
>>
>> I was there with Michael Shapiro and the 7094-II that ran PUFFT was
>> still around. Michael signed my
>
>
> A tape or listing of PUFFT would be cool. With the 7094 simulators
> running about we could revive it.
> I used to have a listing of the PUFFT system (I was trying to make it
> work on ISU's 7090); but, it has gotten lost over the years.

Drat, I hope that turns up some day...


Daiyu Hurst

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May 30, 2015, 7:09:13 PM5/30/15
to
On Thursday, January 11, 2007 at 8:41:23 AM UTC-5, Dave Bloodgood wrote:
> I have fond memories of the dual 6500/600 at Purdue. In 1978, I graduated
> and took a job at TRW in Redondo Beach, who
> had a 7600, which didnt work as well as the Purdue setup,.
>
> I have searched for any archives of the PROCSY ( Purdue Remote Online
> Computing SYstem I think ) and the Purdue
> "Dual Mace" OS, to no avail. It would be a lot of fun to boot one of these
> up on the desk top cyber and relive my past.
>
> Does any one know if these are out there somewhere ?
>
> Dave

The DUAL-MACE source code libraries finally surfaced.
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