Old CLD 1541 Hardware

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Pheonix

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Jun 18, 2006, 1:44:15 PM6/18/06
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I don't even remember what it was called. But there used to be a
device by Chip Level Design (I believe, the ones who released RAMBoard
and Maverick,) that could be attached to a 1541 drive to control drive
motor speed. Instead of having to use a plastic screwdriver and a
hole
in the bottom of your drive, you just slow turned a rather large dial
(I assume it had some way to be locked,) to adjust drive motor speed.
I never actually had one, but I remember reading about it in the
Software Support International (they seem to be defunct now,) catalog.

Does anyone know what they were called, and if there were any for
other commodore drives?

Wolfgang Moser

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Jun 18, 2006, 2:21:11 PM6/18/06
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Hey Pheonix,

nice question, really. If anybody is able to proof
that such a device was no vaporware, may I ask for
the "usual stuff": Scans of the PCBs, photos as well,
scans of the manuals and packaging. Anything that
would be suited for preservation and as artifacts for
my "CLD museum" page.


Womo

Rusty

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Jun 18, 2006, 2:25:56 PM6/18/06
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Maverick Speed Control Box,
CO1189 1541/1541-II $24.95
CO1707 1571$24.95

Full details inside every Maverick V5 manual.

Wolfgang Moser

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Jun 18, 2006, 2:55:06 PM6/18/06
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Hello Rusty,

Rusty schrieb:

details from what? A technical specification
of a vapor device?
Don't get me wrong, I don't you to annoy
especially you, but it is common practice to
mention only what anyone else said. Because
there're many people running around in doing
so, I always ask for a proof. If such is not
available and other hard facts are missing I
consider a thing as vaporware, even if it
was marketed already.

Womo

Rusty

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Jun 18, 2006, 4:47:19 PM6/18/06
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Sorry for the short answer before, there is an advert for the product.

gamemaste

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Jun 18, 2006, 5:59:40 PM6/18/06
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It existed. I have one in fact. They called it Speed Control.
Basically a black box with a big black knob on it. You clipped two
clips in the drive and you were off and running. No need for soldering
(which is what sold me). I did find out that you had to adjust the
speed on the drive as well for this to work. Otherwise it went too
fast. So I dialed the speed on the drive down a bit. Then the control
worked great, and was not as touchy as the pod on the 1541.

-Game

Pheonix

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Jun 19, 2006, 3:43:43 AM6/19/06
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Glad to know my memory wasn't faulty :) Now, I just need to find
where I can buy them :(

Also, on an unrelated issue, was there every any way to bypass the
copy protection tab on a floppy without having to cut a notch? If I
can get a hold of some good original images (with all copy protection
intact,) I'd sort of like to re-master the disks if I can, without
cutting notches. It seems there's be a way, but I can only think that
it would require some major hacking of the drive mechanics. If it
does. then never mind, I'll dig out a disk notcher somewhere and some
write protect tabs. Would rather do that than do major reconstruction
on my floppy drive.

Rusty

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Jun 19, 2006, 6:16:40 AM6/19/06
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Very, very easy, just cut the plastic insulation so you expose the
wires (do not cut through!) on the orange and purple (Pins 3/4) wires
which plug into the second connector block (p6) and join them. Cover
with tape. Done.

gamemaste

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Jun 19, 2006, 9:51:37 AM6/19/06
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On 6/19/2006 3:43 AM, Pheonix wrote:

> On Sun, 18 Jun 2006 21:59:40 GMT, gamemaste wrote:
>
> Glad to know my memory wasn't faulty :) Now, I just need to find
> where I can buy them :(
>
> Also, on an unrelated issue, was there every any way to bypass the
> copy protection tab on a floppy without having to cut a notch? If I
> can get a hold of some good original images (with all copy protection
> intact,) I'd sort of like to re-master the disks if I can, without
> cutting notches. It seems there's be a way, but I can only think that
> it would require some major hacking of the drive mechanics. If it
> does. then never mind, I'll dig out a disk notcher somewhere and some
> write protect tabs. Would rather do that than do major reconstruction
> on my floppy drive.

Hmm the only way to bypass it that I know was hacking the sensor. I
know several people that put a toggle switch in so they could turn it on
or off if they wanted.

-Game

gamemaste

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Jun 19, 2006, 9:54:40 AM6/19/06
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Ahh nice. Never thought of just splicing them together like that. Of
course then you don't have a switch and have to open the case to turn
then sensor back on. But certainly beats having to cut the wires and
solder in a toggle switch.

-Game

Rodolfo Leal

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Jun 19, 2006, 1:43:42 PM6/19/06
to

I modified one of my drives to have the sensor switch. I just ran
couple of wires from the pins, without cutting them or even soldering
them. I put the swith at the front and changed the original LED with a
bicolored one. One of the easiest hacks for a 1541.

Of course, I learnt later that I have to set the toggle on when
changing disks, so the new one could be read without problems. That or
isssuing an I command to reset the BAM.


Rodolfo Leal

Message has been deleted

Wolfgang Moser

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Jun 21, 2006, 4:30:30 AM6/21/06
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Hello gamemaste,

gamemaste wrote:
>
> It existed. I have one in fact. They called it Speed Control.
> Basically a black box with a big black knob on it. You clipped two
> clips in the drive and you were off and running. No need for soldering
> (which is what sold me). I did find out that you had to adjust the
> speed on the drive as well for this to work. Otherwise it went too
> fast. So I dialed the speed on the drive down a bit. Then the control
> worked great, and was not as touchy as the pod on the 1541.

may I ask for photos of that device. From outside
and maybe the inner workings at your option? Scans
of the manual would be cool also.

From your description I assume that there is
nothing more to be found within than a simple
potentiometer that gets connected in parallel to
the one already built in the motor control circuit
of the drive.


You know, there is a schematic from a similar motor
control circuit for Alps drive mechanics in the
Service Manual for the Commodore 2031 Low Profile
disk drive. Refer to page 34 of PN-314011-01,
available here:

http://www.zimmers.net/anonftp/pub/cbm/schematics/drives/old/2031/page-34.gif

Search for VR1 this should be the important part
in the sense of this discussion and if you ask me.

After having looked into that schematic it now
sounds reasonable why you had to adjust the builtin
potentiometer for the completed assembly down. Due
to the nature of paralleled resistors, this needs
to be done to let the "foreign" potentiometer get
into effect.


All you need to get then would be a high precision
RPM measurment tool, so that you can adjust your
drive without the hassle of using a strobo-lamp.
Did I mention that I just wrote such a measurment
tool for the OpenCBM transfer suite? Maybe someone
wants to write a true C64 application out of it,
all you need to do is to write a C64 host
application for the readily available 6502 floppy
drive core routines. These are GPLed code, so
you all are free to derive from these as long as
you take over the license as well.


Womo

gamemaste

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Jun 22, 2006, 1:00:31 AM6/22/06
to
On 6/21/2006 4:30 AM, Wolfgang Moser wrote:
> Hello gamemaste,
>
> gamemaste wrote:
>>
>> It existed. I have one in fact. They called it Speed Control.
>> Basically a black box with a big black knob on it. You clipped two
>> clips in the drive and you were off and running. No need for soldering
>> (which is what sold me). I did find out that you had to adjust the
>> speed on the drive as well for this to work. Otherwise it went too
>> fast. So I dialed the speed on the drive down a bit. Then the control
>> worked great, and was not as touchy as the pod on the 1541.
>
> may I ask for photos of that device. From outside
> and maybe the inner workings at your option? Scans
> of the manual would be cool also.

Yes I can take a shot of the outside, but I don't really want to take it
apart. The manual was a sheet of paper.....I will see if I can find it
but not sure where it is at this point.


>
> From your description I assume that there is
> nothing more to be found within than a simple
> potentiometer that gets connected in parallel to
> the one already built in the motor control circuit
> of the drive.

Yes I suspect as much but it has a heavy duty feel to it with a big
knob. Which made it so much easier than adjusting the potentiometer
inside the drive. And it was definitely worth it for me, one of the
best $30 I ever spent. Really saved me time when I was backing up some
tough copy protected disks (Rapidlok for example).

-Game

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