Risks Digest 33.09

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RISKS-LIST: Risks-Forum Digest Monday 14 March 2022 Volume 33 : Issue 09

ACM FORUM ON RISKS TO THE PUBLIC IN COMPUTERS AND RELATED SYSTEMS (comp.risks)
Peter G. Neumann, founder and still moderator

***** See last item for further information, disclaimers, caveats, etc. *****
This issue is archived at <http://www.risks.org> as
<http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/33.09>
The current issue can also be found at
<http://www.csl.sri.com/users/risko/risks.txt>

Contents:
Medical, IoT Devices Vulnerable to Attack (Dark Reading)
Who's Responsible if a Tesla on Autopilot Kills Someone? (NextGov)
Q&A with a legal expert: When a Tesla on autopilot kills someone,
who is responsible? (techxplore)
Finnish govt agency warns of unusual aircraft GPS interference
(BleepingComputer)
Thermostat offline? Here's perhaps why ... (Lauren Weinstein)
Encryption Meant to Protect Against Quantum Hackers Is Easily Cracked
(New Scientist)
Biden's cryptocurrency executive order sets stage for federal regulation
(WashPost)
How People Actually Make Money From Cryptocurrencies (WiReD)
Fraud Is Flourishing on Zelle. The Banks Say It's Not Their Problem.
(NYTimes)
Linux Bug Gives Root on All Major Distros, Exploit Released
(BleepingComputer)
Samsung: Hackers breached company data, source code for Galaxy
Warning: Objects in driverless car sensors may be closer than they devices
(CNBC)
Senate passes permanent Daylight Saving Time: Effects on school children of
permanent Daylight Saving Time (Lauren Weinstein)
1974 -- The year Daylight Saving Time went too far (MercuryNews)
Get rid of Daylight-Savings Time (Erik Honda)
Docker, cgroups and the farce of SELinux (Bugzilla)
Calvin Ridley's suspension raises betting concerns (WashPost)
New tech could pull cars over, call first responders in emergencies (WTOP)
Obfuscated URLs IArthur T.)
Chernobyl Redux? (Henry Baker)
Combat/t/ing Disinformation Can Feel Like a Lost Cause. It Isn't.
(Jay Caspian King)
Russian State-Sponsored Cyber Actors Access Network Misconfigured with
Default MFA Protocols (US-CERT)
A new iron curtain is descending across Russia's Internet (WashPost)
Turmoil Over Ukraine Could Debilitate Russia's Space Program (WiReD)
Ukraine and the Internet (sundry sources)
The Race to Rescue Ukraine's Power Grid From Russia (WiReD)
Putin's pre-war moves against U.S. tech giants laid groundwork for crackdown
on free expression (WashPost)
Pro-Putin Disinformation on Ukraine Is Thriving in Online Anti-Vax Groups
(Mother Jones)
Re: Here Comes the Full Amazonification of Whole Foods, or maybe not
(John Levine)
Re: Small cyberphysical watermarks could prevent huge headaches (Barry Gold)
Re: New Bill Would Bring Mobile Voting To WashDC (Michael Kohne,
Amos Shapir, Neil Youngman)
MMS spam? (Rob Slade)
Abridged info on RISKS (comp.risks)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2022 11:56:44 -0500 (EST)
From: ACM TechNews <technew...@acm.org>
Subject: Medical, IoT Devices Vulnerable to Attack (Dark Reading)

Jai Vijayan, Dark Reading, 8 Mar 2022, via ACM TechNews; 11 Mar 2022

Researchers at Forescout's Vedere Labs cybersecurity intelligence team and
CyberMDX cybersecurity service provider discovered seven vulnerabilities,
known collectively as "Access:7," in more than 150 Internet of Things (IoT)
devices made by more than 100 companies. Three of the bugs, rated critical,
allow attackers to gain full control of devices by remotely executing
malicious code. The remainder, rated moderate to high in severity, allow
attackers to steal data or execute denial-of-service attacks. The flaws were
found in multiple versions of PTC Axeda agent and PTC Desktop Server, which
are used in many IoT devices to enable remote access and management. All
versions of the Axeda technology below 6.9.3 are affected. PTC has released
patches for the vulnerabilities.

https://orange.hosting.lsoft.com/trk/click?ref=nwrbbrs9_6-2e35bx23221ex073508&

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 11:03:08 -1000
From: geoff goodfellow <ge...@iconia.com>
Subject: Who's Responsible if a Tesla on Autopilot Kills Someone? (NextGov)

Vehicular manslaughter charges filed in Los Angeles earlier this year mark
the first felony prosecution in the U.S. of a fatal car crash involving a
driver-assist system.

In late 2019, Kevin George Aziz Riad's car sped off a California freeway,
ran a red light, and crashed into another car, killing the two people
inside. Riad's car, a Tesla Model S, was on autopilot. [...]

https://www.nextgov.com/ideas/2022/03/whos-responsible-if-tesla-autopilot-kills-someone/363111/

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2022 11:33:59 +0800
From: Richard Stein <rms...@ieee.org>
Subject: Q&A with a legal expert: When a Tesla on autopilot kills someone,
who is responsible? (techxplore.com)

https://techxplore.com/news/2022-03-qa-legal-expert-tesla-autopilot.html

"Ultimately, these issues depend on how federal regulators like the National
Highway Traffic Safety Administration regulate the vehicle. They will have
to set a safety performance standard which the manufacturer has to satisfy
before it can commercially distribute the product as fully autonomous. The
question is where the regulators set that standard at, and I don't think
it's easy to get right. At that point there will be a good debate to be had:
Did they get it right or not? We're still a few years out. I think we'll all
be having these conversations in 2025."

Blame the regulators for a permissive AV liability standard that enables
wide-spread AV deployments? Regulators are subject to industry capture. As
are legislators who author the laws that enable regulation. Campaign
contributions often speak at a higher volume than non-profit public health
and safety interests.

Recurrent, high-profile product and service outrage incidents across the
finance, aerospace, pharmaceutical, chemical, and medical device sectors
reveal that regulatory industrial capture, regulatory approval delegation to
industry contribute to spectacular brand disasters.

A product usage license, as stated via terms of service, universally assert
corporate indemnification: you, the customer, agree to hold the business and
its employees faultless for any untoward event (accident, death, errant
outcome) in exchange for a right to use the product or service. These
ubiquitous terms shield CxO product decisions that can boost profits, though
the business governance directive (and ensuing product modification, often
using technology-based substitutes) may elevate public health and safety
risks.

Federal and state justice officials hesitate to pursue criminal remedies,
and frequently defer criminal prosecution in exchange for civil penalties,
settlements, and enhanced business monitoring. Indemnification usage
restrictions might deter profit pursuit at the expense of public health and
safety.

Public suspicion about regulatory oversight and enforcement effectiveness,
and generally diminished trust in expertise, swells skepticism. Look no
future than the consumer marketplace to reaffirm doubt.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2022 16:07:59 -0500
From: Jan Wolitzky <jan.wo...@gmail.com>
Subject: Finnish govt agency warns of unusual aircraft GPS interference
(BleepingComputer)

Finland's Transport and Communications Agency, Traficom, has issued a
public announcement informing of an unusual spike in GPS interference near
the country's eastern border.

The origin of the interference remains unknown, but based on numerous
reports submitted to the agency from various sources, it has started during
the weekend and is still ongoing.

This has resulted in issuing NOTAMs (notices to airmen) to raise pilot
awareness and help them take additional measures to keep flights safe.

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/technology/finnish-govt-agency-warns-of-unusual-aircraft-gps-interference/

[In the U.S., NOTAMs now stands for Notices To Air Missions.]

[In Scotland, it might stand for No tam o' shanters indoors. PGN]

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2022 13:43:35 -0700
From: Lauren Weinstein <lau...@vortex.com>
Subject: Thermostat offline? Here's perhaps why ...

There are very widespread reports of Honeywell/Resideo Internet thermostats
being offline in one or another respect since yesterday evening, continuing
to now, including their apps and website being unavailable for long
periods. No known time for fixes.

[Daylight Savings and Loan Time? Borrowing an hour until the fall,
without interest? Can you bank on it? PGN

[For no particular reason, I am reminded of David Huffman telling me in
1966 that a merger of Honeywell and Fairchild was being planned, and
that it would be called *Farewell Honeychild*. In that spirit, this one
might be called *Restwell HoneyDayO*. PGN]

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2022 11:56:44 -0500 (EST)
From: ACM TechNews <technew...@acm.org>
Subject: Encryption Meant to Protect Against Quantum Hackers Is Easily
Cracked (New Scientist)

Matthew Sparkes, *New Scientist*, 8 Mar 2022,
via ACM TechNews; 11 Mar 2022

Ward Beullens at IBM Research Zurich in Switzerland easily cracked a
cryptography algorithm touted as one of three contenders for a global
standard against quantum hacking. Rainbow is a signature algorithm submitted
to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)'s
Post-Quantum Cryptography competition, and Beullens extracted Rainbow's
secret key from a public key in just 53 hours on a standard laptop. He said
this flaw would enable attackers to wrongfully "prove" they are someone
else, rendering Rainbow "useless" for message verification. NIST's Dustin
Moody said the Rainbow hack had been confirmed, and the algorithm will not
likely be selected as the final signature algorithm.

https://orange.hosting.lsoft.com/trk/click?ref=3Dznwrbbrs9_6-2e35bx232218x073508&

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:56:52 -0500
From: Gabe Goldberg <ga...@gabegold.com>
Subject: Biden's cryptocurrency executive order sets stage for federal
regulation (WashPost)

The long-awaited executive order aims to ensure that the U.S. fosters the
surging industry while mitigating its potential threats.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2022/03/09/biden-crypto-executive-order

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2022 21:47:10 -0400
From: Gabe Goldberg <ga...@gabegold.com>
Subject: How People Actually Make Money From Cryptocurrencies (WiReD)

For many crypto[currency] traders who are in it for the medium to long haul,
there are some other ways to make money on cryptocurrency that's just
sitting in your crypto-wallet: staking and yield farming on DeFi networks.
DeFi is just a catchall term for *decentralized finance* -- —pretty much all
the services and tools built on blockchain for currencies and smart
contracts.

And, as with any type of digital network, DeFi services are vulnerable to
hacking, bad programming, and other glitches and problems beyond your
control. Getting good, consistent yields may require more work than you're
willing to do [...] watching the value of tokens and jumping from one type
of yield farm to another can get good results, but it's not unlike trying to
time the stock market. It can be very risky and could require more luck than
skill.

What could possibly go wrong?
[It DeFi-es the imagination? It certainly does not DeiFi it. PGN]

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2022 23:55:50 -0500
From: Gabe Goldberg <ga...@gabegold.com>
Subject: Fraud Is Flourishing on Zelle. The Banks Say It's Not Their Problem.
(NYTimes)
Zelle, the payments platform used by millions of customers, is a popular
target of scammers. But banks have been reluctant to make fraud victims
whole — despite owning the system.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/06/business/payments-fraud-zelle-banks.html

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2022 11:43:04 -0400 (EDT)
From: ACM TechNews <technew...@acm.org>
Subject: Linux Bug Gives Root on All Major Distros, Exploit Released
(BleepingComputer)

Lawrence Abrams, BleepingComputer, 7 Mar 2022,
via ACM TechNews, 14 Mar 2022

Security researcher Max Kellermann recently disclosed his discovery of the
Dirty Pipe Linux bug, which lets local users obtain root privileges through
publicly available exploits, and impacts Linux Kernel 5.8 and later
iterations, even on Android devices. He released a proof-of-concept exploit
that allows local users to inject their own data into sensitive read-only
files, stripping restrictions or tweaking configurations to expand their
access privileges. Kellermann alerted various Linux maintainers about Dirty
Pipe beginning Feb. 20, and although it has been corrected in Linux kernels
5.16.11, 5.15.25, and 5.10.102, many servers still are running outdated
kernels.

https://orange.hosting.lsoft.com/trk/click?ref=znwrbbrs9_6-2e384x23230fx073950&

[Tom Van Vleck <th...@multicians.org> noted
"Dirty pipe" linux kernel bug (The Register)
Linux distributions patch kernel privilege escalation flaw
https://www.theregister.com/2022/03/08/in_brief_security/
PGN]

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 7 Mar 2022 16:27:09 -0500
From: "Steven J. Greenwald" <greenwa...@gmail.com>
Subject: Samsung: Hackers breached company data, source code for Galaxy
devices (CNBC)

"The statement from the South Korean electronics giant comes after hacking
group Lapsus$ claimed over the weekend via its Telegram channel that it has
stolen 190 gigabytes of confidential Samsung source code."

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/03/07/samsung-hackers-breached-company-data-source-code-for-galaxy-devices.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 17:19:27 +0800
From: Richard Stein <rms...@ieee.org>
Subject: Warning: Objects in driverless car sensors may be closer than they
appear (techxplore.com)

https://techxplore.com/news/2022-03-driverless-car-sensors-closer.html

"Researchers at Duke University have demonstrated the first attack strategy
that can fool industry-standard autonomous vehicle sensors into believing
nearby objects are closer (or further) than they appear without being
detected."

The frustum attack confuses AV proximity analysis. The essay suggests that
AV data-sharing on approach or stereo cameras might significantly reduce AV
proximity ambiguities.

The US NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) might add this
case to their AV accident root cause value list.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 11:48:57 -0700
From: Lauren Weinstein <lau...@vortex.com>
Subject: Senate passes permanent Daylight Saving Time: Effects on
school children of permanent Daylight Saving Time

Permanent Daylight Saving Time was tried in the U.S. back around 1970
I believe. After an increase in dark morning accidents among school
children, with schools and businesses resisting changing their hours,
the plan was quickly rescinded. -L

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 12:12:55 -0700
From: Lauren Weinstein <lau...@vortex.com>
Subject: 1974 -- The year Daylight Saving Time went too far (MercuryNews)

[Permanent Daylight Saving Time was tried in the U.S. back around 1970.
After an increase in dark morning accidents among school children, with
schools and businesses resisting changing their hours, the plan was
quickly rescinded. -L] (PGN-ed into one message)

1974: The year Daylight Saving Time went too far
The "permanent daylight saving time" experiment that failed: -:

https://www.mercurynews.com/2016/10/30/the-year-daylight-saving-time-went-too-far/

------------------------------

Date; Tue, 15 Mar 2022 12:58:23 PD
From: Peter G Neumann
Subject: Get rid of Daylight-Savings Time (Erik Honda)

Letter from Erik Honda to *The San Francisco Chronicle*, 15 Mar 2022:

Four years ago, we [California] overwhelming passed a ballot initiative in
California instructing our politicians to get rid of daylight-saving time.

Every spring forward has been documented to lead to increased car accidents
and heart attacks, with no discernible benefits to anyone. Not to mention
it makes me tired and sad.

Why can't our elected officials get this done? Now please.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2022 12:25:25 -0500
From: Cliff Kilby
Subject: Docker, cgroups and the farce of SELinux (Bugzilla)

News emerged of a potential container escape.
https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=2051505

Quay helpfully reviewed this and noted that SELinux seems to provide
protection from the vulnerability.

Unfortunately common behavior is to disable security features for
containers. The presence of btrfs was enough to cause Docker to fail to
attempt to launch at all with SELinux enabled.

https://github.com/moby/moby/issues/7952 (now closed)

RedHat themselves even provide instructions to disable SELinux on Podman (a
container orchestrator).

https://www.redhat.com/sysadmin/podman-inside-container

High-level security advice for all servers has been "use MAC" for many years
to enforce process isolation and limit the scope of unknown vulnerabilities.
Virtualization is a hard problem to solve with process isolation
enforcement, but it is doable. Containers don't want to be marketed as
virtualization services, but they are. Everything you need to know to run a
virtualization service applies to a container service, and unlike
virtualization, containers are not practicing process isolation.

SELinux profiles use the MAC label "container_file_t" for permission
constraints on the container host.

https://www.redhat.com/sysadmin/privileged-flag-container-engines

This label may be incorrectly applied to system level resources manually
due to poor user advice.

It would behoove container users to ensure that a MAC is in place (SELinux,
AppArmour, seccomp), is in enforce, and is scoped to processes in the
container execution environment and that the containers haven't been over
granted permission (like CAP_SYS_ADMIN), or granted access to files that
should have been protected by misapplied labels.

These opinions are my own and may not represent those of my employer.
I do not require attribution. [Unusual, but Apparently Required, PGN]

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2022 14:52:55 -0400
From: Gabe Goldberg <ga...@gabegold.com>
Subject: Calvin Ridley's suspension raises betting concerns (WashPost)

In November, Calvin Ridley violated a sacrosanct rule of professional sports
with an ease that would have been unimaginable just a decade ago. With a
few taps of his smartphone while in Florida, away from his team, the Atlanta
Falcons wide receiver placed a series of bets, which the NFL later detected
and punished him for this week with an indefinite suspension. [...]

Companies such as Genius Sports and Sportradar, which formerly worked with
the NFL and is still in business with MLB, the NHL, the NBA and other
leagues, monitor betting patterns and search for inconsistencies. They have
technology that can spot unusual patterns, and then a human analyst
determines whether they can be explained -- a changed forecast or reported
injury, for example -- or whether the league needs to be alerted, said Andy
Cunningham, the director of global partnerships for Sportradar's Integrity
Services.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2022/03/11/calvin-ridley-sports-leagues-gambling

The risk? Illicit betting? Increasing surveillance? Former, sure. Latter,
sure, because who knows what other data's being gathered by non-sports
figures.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2022 08:48:50 -1000
From: geoff goodfellow <ge...@iconia.com>
Subject: New tech could pull cars over, call first responders in emergencies
(WTOP)

High-tech systems in new cars that can watch drivers and ensure they're
paying attention are taking another leap forward.

Those systems, which involve cameras and sensors, can also be used to
determine if a driver has fallen asleep or is experiencing a medical
emergency.

Other technology already incorporated into the car can then be used to
safely pull over the vehicle and call first responders if the driver is
unresponsive.

Keith Barry, a car reporter at Consumer Reports said the pull-over
feature is closer than many people realize. [...]
<https://www.consumerreports.org/car-safety/driver-monitoring-can-pull-car-over-if-driver-incapacitated-a1204997865/>
https://wtop.com/consumer-news/2022/03/updated-tech-could-pull-cars-over-ca=
ll-first-responders-in-emergencies/

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 05 Mar 2022 18:56:32 -0500
From: "Arthur T." <risks202203...@xoxy.net>
Subject: Obfuscated URLs

Most URL shorteners have a way to expand a URL so you can see where you're
going before you actually go to the obfuscated site. Risks digest has
several non-shortening obfuscated URLs for which I have not found a way to
see where a click will take me without actually going there. For instance,
In RISKS-33.08, there were ten links of the form:
https://orange.hosting.lsoft.com/trk/click?ref=semirandom-looking-string.

I'm sure that the readers and contributors are aware of the RISKS of
clicking on "blind" URLs, so I'm surprised to see them here. Apparently
it's been going on for close to a decade, but I guess this is the first time
I wanted to click through on one.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 06 Mar 2022 16:42:40 +0000
From: Henry Baker <hba...@pipeline.com>
Subject: Chernobyl Redux?

I finally got around to watching the 'Chernobyl' miniseries, and I'm
wondering how accurate its portrayal was. (Yes, I know, my timing is either
impeccable or terribly ironic.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chernobyl_(miniseries)

In particular, I don't recall any mention at the time of the possibility of
the sort of multi-megaton-equivalent explosion that was successfully avoided
in the series.

This brings me back to today. If something were to happen to the operators
of the Chernobyl (or other ex-Soviet reactors), would these reactors be
capable of shutting themselves down automatically in a 'safe' way?

It appears that any of these plants have the possibility of wreaking a lot
more havoc than the 'small' 'tactical' battlefield nukes that are frequently
mentioned in the media.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2022 10:45:46 PST
From: Peter Neumann <neu...@csl.sri.com>
Subject: Combat/t/ing Disinformation Can Feel Like a Lost Cause. It Isn't.
(Jay Caspian King)

People can be taught to spot and then ignore online falsehoods.
Jay Caspian King, *The New York Times*, lead op-ed in the editorial
spot, 9 Mar 2022, national edition, A18

* An educational alternative (e.g., Finland and Estonia)
* The huge gap we need to close (school students failing media literacy)
* Lessons that work
(14 U.S. states offer mandatory media literacy education.)

[I still hate "COMbating" in favor of "comBATTing" for the double
consonant in the ACCented SYLLable. PGN]

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 21:12:48 +0000
From: US-...@messages.cisa.gov
Subject: Russian State-Sponsored Cyber Actors Access Network Misconfigured
with Default MFA Protocols (US-CERT)

https://us-cert.cisa.gov/ncas/current-activity/2022/03/15/russian-state-sponsored-cyber-actors-access-network-misconfigured

Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) - Defend Today,
Secure Tomorrow

------------------------------

Date: March 5, 2022 at 22:59:59 GMT+9
From: Dewayne Hendricks <dew...@warpspeed.com>
Subject: A new iron curtain is descending across Russia's Internet
(WashPost)

[Note: This item comes from friend Tim Pozar. DLH] (via Dave Farber)

Craig Timberg, Cat Zakrzewski and Joseph Menn, *The Washington Post*,
4 Mar 2022

A new iron curtain is descending across Russia's Internet On Friday, online
access was curtailed by both Russian censors and Western businesses as the
war in Ukraine became a reason for moves that limited free access to the
Internet

https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2022/03/04/russia-ukraine-internet-cogent-cutoff/

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2022 23:39:56 -0500
From: Gabe Goldberg <ga...@gabegold.com>
Subject: Turmoil Over Ukraine Could Debilitate Russia's Space Program (WiReD)

In response to international sanctions, Russia's space agency is distancing
itself from its former partners and risks losing its role as a major space
power.

Roscosmos also announced it will no longer supply rocket engines to the
United States. “Let them fly on their brooms," Rogozin said on a state-owned
Russian news channel.

https://www.wired.com/story/turmoil-over-ukraine-could-debilitate-russias-space-program/

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2022 10:08:02 -0800
From: Lauren Weinstein <lau...@vortex.com>
Subject: Ukraine and the Internet (sundry sources)

[PGN-ed]

Ukrainians Find That Relatives in Russia Don't Believe It's a War
https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/06/world/europe/ukraine-russia-families.html?smid=tw-share

- - -

Russia creates its own TLS certificate authority to bypass sanctions: Given
their suspect nature and concerns about traffic interception by Russian
authorities, the use of such certificates is enormously problematic. Above
all, do not install such certificates manually in browsers under any
conditions and no matter how prompted to do so. -L

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/russia-creates-its-own-tls-certificate-authority-to-bypass-sanctions/

- - -

Fake Ukraine spam solicitations for money are already widely circulating,
usually asking for payment in bitcoin.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2022 23:08:35 -0500
From: Gabe Goldberg <ga...@gabegold.com>
Subject: The Race to Rescue Ukraine's Power Grid From Russia (WiReD)

In late February, Ukraine began a long-planned 72-hour test to unhook its
electricity grid from Russia's. Then the invasion started.

https://www.wired.com/story/the-race-to-rescue-ukraines-power-grid-from-russia

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2022 14:29:24 -0500
From: Monty Solomon <mo...@roscom.com>
Subject: Putin's pre-war moves against U.S. tech giants laid groundwork for
crackdown on free expression

Google and Apple blinked after threats from Russian agents.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/03/12/russia-putin-google-apple-navalny/

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2022 16:03:57 -0700
From: Lauren Weinstein <lau...@vortex.com>
Subject: Pro-Putin Disinformation on Ukraine Is Thriving in Online Anti-Vax
Groups (Mother Jones)

https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2022/03/pro-putin-disinformation-on-ukraine-is-thriving-in-online-anti-vax-groups/

[In context, the correlation between the two topics seems not at all
surprising. PGN]

------------------------------

Date: 5 Mar 2022 20:44:18 -0500
From: "John Levine" <jo...@iecc.com>
Subject: Re: Here Comes the Full Amazonification of Whole Foods, or maybe
not (RISKS-33.08)

Today's Slate Money podcast has a different take. They note that
Amazon is closing their physical bookstores, that it feels like Whole
Foods has been on autopilot since Amazon bought it, and in Amazon's
attempts to run physical stores have been consistently underwhelming.

They also note that the array of cameras and sensors required by Just Walk
Out is really creeepy.

Listen here. The Amazon segment starts at about 20:30:
https://slate.com/podcasts/slate-money/2022/03/big-tech-russia-amazon-stores

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2022 10:31:45 -0800
From: Barry Gold <Barry...@ca.rr.com>
Subject: Re: Small cyberphysical watermarks could prevent huge headaches
caused, by fake meds (RISKS-33.08)

Consumers can't use the app pre-sale, but most Internet sales involve either
credit cards or a payment app like PayPal. When the drug arrives they can
check it with the app. If it's fake, they return it. If their payment isn't
refunded, they can go to the card issuer or PayPal etc. and get their money
back that way.

As for law enforcement: if the thing comes into their hands legitimately,
they can test it. So if they buy some drugs and test them, that's perfectly
okay under search and seizure. Only if they took it away from somebody who
had bought it would they run into S&S problems.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 7 Mar 2022 06:13:37 -0500
From: Michael Kohne <mhk...@kohne.org>
Subject: Re: New Bill Would Bring Mobile Voting To WashDC (RISKS-33.08)

If a non-anonymous solution is available, bad actors will try to find ways
to force people who shouldn't be using into using it. This will happen both
at a policy level and an individual level.

At a policy level, a bad-guy politician will minimize availability of
anonymous voting in order to allow peer-pressuring of smaller populations
into either not voting or voting for the bad guys. In an area that's close,
this kind of thing could easily swing elections.

At an individual level, you can easily envision an abusive spouse forcing
the victim to vote how the spouse wants. Right now the best the abuser can
do is force the victim to not vote, with non-anonymous voting they can
actually force the spouse to vote for the abuser's preferred candidate.

And if you think the policy level thing won't happen, I invite you to review
the last few years of controversy over polling places in parts of the US --
there's plenty of evidence that bad guys will try to prevent minorities from
voting if they can manage it.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 7 Mar 2022 13:40:01 +0200
From: Amos Shapir <amo...@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: New Bill Would Bring Mobile Voting To WashDC (RISKS-33.08)

What is missing is that if anonymity becomes an option, the choice of
anonymity is not anonymous!

This means that if someone is bullied into voting in a certain way, they
might also be bullied into using the non-anonymous option to vote by.

[Similar comment form John Beattie. PGN]

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2022 13:20:30 +0000
From: Neil Youngman <neil.y...@youngman.org.uk>
Subject: Re: New Bill Would Bring Mobile Voting To WashDC (RISKS-33.08)

1. It shouldn't be forced on people, but it's not just the government that
might wish to force it on people. In a relationship where a dominant
member who wants others in the relationship to vote his choices instead
of their own choices, this again allows him/her to insist that they use
the non-anonymous voting system.

2. In an all anonymous system vote buying is hampered by the inability of
the buyer to know whether the votes stayed bought. With your proposal the
buyer can tie payment to seeing the vote.

It may be convenient for you, but it also may have negative consequences for
democracy.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 7 Mar 2022 07:21:29 -0800
From: Rob Slade <rsl...@gmail.com>
Subject: MMS spam?

I have been receiving a lot of MMS (as opposed to SMS, normal text) messages
on my phones recently. One of the phones doesn't have a data plan, so I
don't get to see what the messages are. (Yes, yes, I *know* the cell
companies promise that their plans allow you unlimited voice, video, and
pictures "text" messages. They lie.) I have generally despaired of trying
to get people to realize the difference between SMS and MMS messages, and
the incompatibilities that make MMS messages unreliable even if you do have
the phone and cell/mobile data plan to support them.

However, a few days ago I got an MMS message from someone who *is*
technically competent, and, when I challenged him, he denied sending any
such message. Given that he would know, and the increase in numbers, I am
wondering if there is some new spamming campaign utilizing MMS messages.

Anybody heard/seen anything along these lines?

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2020 11:11:11 -0800
From: RISKS-...@csl.sri.com
Subject: Abridged info on RISKS (comp.risks)

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End of RISKS-FORUM Digest 33.09
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