How to set up a printer in a network using DHCP ?

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Lars Erdmann

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Apr 22, 2012, 3:13:53 AM4/22/12
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Hallo,

I have an network capable printer. I also have a router (with integrated DSL
modem).
I have enabled the DHCP server in the router so that all computers receive
their IP address (and additional
network configuration: DNS server, default gateway etc.) automatically.

Questions:
1) What do I have to do to make the network printer accessible under OS/2 ?
I admit I have never done that yet.
2) How does the printer receive its IP address ? Since the IP address can
vary (when the lease expires ?),
how do I "abstract" access to the printer from other computers so that the
potential change in IP address won't matter ?
3) the printer is the MFC-9460CDN from Brother. It says it can do PCL. Does
anyone have experience if the ordinary
PCL OS/2 printer driver will do ?


Lars

Frank Beythien

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Apr 22, 2012, 4:12:32 AM4/22/12
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Am 22.04.2012 09:13, schrieb Lars Erdmann:
> Hallo,
>
> I have an network capable printer. I also have a router (with integrated
> DSL modem).
> I have enabled the DHCP server in the router so that all computers
> receive their IP address (and additional
> network configuration: DNS server, default gateway etc.) automatically.
>
> Questions:
> 1) What do I have to do to make the network printer accessible under
> OS/2 ? I admit I have never done that yet.

Install as a local printer. Then in the output port settings choose SLPR
or install and then SLPR.

> 2) How does the printer receive its IP address ? Since the IP address
> can vary (when the lease expires ?),
> how do I "abstract" access to the printer from other computers so that
> the potential change in IP address won't matter ?

Either use a fixed IP outside of the routers DHCP range (but within the
same subnet) and configure the printer IP manually, or use the routers
DHCP option "always use the same IP for this device" (if your router has
such an option, FritzBoxes have). Then you know the "static dynamic"
address after the first time.

> 3) the printer is the MFC-9460CDN from Brother. It says it can do PCL.
> Does anyone have experience if the ordinary
> PCL OS/2 printer driver will do ?

No, but you could try CUPS and / or Postscript, too.
I dont' think you to will get anything else working than printing on
OS/2. Perhaps scan to ftp if the brother has such an option.

CU/2
Frank

Andreas Kohl

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Apr 22, 2012, 4:42:48 AM4/22/12
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Hello,

Frank Beythien schrieb:
> Am 22.04.2012 09:13, schrieb Lars Erdmann:
>> Hallo,
>>
>> I have an network capable printer. I also have a router (with integrated
>> DSL modem).
>> I have enabled the DHCP server in the router so that all computers
>> receive their IP address (and additional
>> network configuration: DNS server, default gateway etc.) automatically.
>>
>> Questions:
>> 1) What do I have to do to make the network printer accessible under
>> OS/2 ? I admit I have never done that yet.
>
> Install as a local printer. Then in the output port settings choose SLPR
> or install and then SLPR.
>
>> 2) How does the printer receive its IP address ? Since the IP address
>> can vary (when the lease expires ?),
>> how do I "abstract" access to the printer from other computers so that
>> the potential change in IP address won't matter ?
>
> Either use a fixed IP outside of the routers DHCP range (but within the
> same subnet) and configure the printer IP manually, or use the routers
> DHCP option "always use the same IP for this device" (if your router has
> such an option, FritzBoxes have). Then you know the "static dynamic"
> address after the first time.

In real world it should be a fixed IP address for printers or similar
devices.

>> 3) the printer is the MFC-9460CDN from Brother. It says it can do PCL.
>> Does anyone have experience if the ordinary
>> PCL OS/2 printer driver will do ?
>
> No, but you could try CUPS and / or Postscript, too.
> I dont' think you to will get anything else working than printing on
> OS/2. Perhaps scan to ftp if the brother has such an option.

From Brother's web site: "PCL 6 und PostScript 3".
So you could simply use IBM's LASERJET driver. HP LaserJet 4000 means
PCL6 here. I'm doing it this way for some non-PS Canon printers.
Or maybe better IBMs PSCRIPT driver. You could use the PIN utility to
integrate the PPD from Brother's BR-script driver.

Andreas

Andreas Kohl

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Apr 22, 2012, 4:44:20 AM4/22/12
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Lars Erdmann

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Apr 23, 2012, 2:09:53 AM4/23/12
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Hallo,

I am reluctant to install SLPR as I don't have any experience with it.

I now looked into what the printer can do (via its http admin page):

1) It has a NetBIOS node name / it supports the NetBIOS protocol
2) it supports LPD. It adds this info: "(send PC-Fax)" but I don't know what
that means.

Because of 1) can't I just install OS/2 NetBIOS support and the associated
utitilies
(resource browser for example) ?
For NetBIOS you can also specify WINS server. Is that in any way relevant
for OS/2 ?


If not 1), how about 2) ? I can see that there are LPD related daemons that
come with OS/2 but again I am unsure on how to use these.


By the way: I can configure the IP Address of the printer but I have the
impression that it automatically received it
through DHCP because the gateway is also correctly set and I never
configured these values myself.
In the TCP/IP config screen, it has this a selection box "Boot Method" with
the following selections:
AUTO (this is what is currently set)
BOOTP
DHCP
RARP
STATIC
What in the world does "Boot Method" mean for a printer ? Or does it just
mean how it receives its IP address when it is powered on ?

It then has this additional checkbox:
"Activate APIPA"
What is "APIPA" ?

What would be the most simple settings for a home network as I have it ?
I don't plan to access this printer via the internet. I only want to use it
inside the private IP range on the
"private side of the router".


By the way: the printer also supports "Scan to FTP" (looks like this
printer supports about everything).
How does that work ? Also given the fact that I am using DHCP addresses for
all the computers in the network.


Lars



"Frank Beythien" <nospa...@efbe.prima.de> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:9vhsrg...@mid.individual.net...

Andreas Kohl

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Apr 23, 2012, 4:18:52 AM4/23/12
to
Lars Erdmann schrieb:
> Hallo,
>
> I am reluctant to install SLPR as I don't have any experience with it.
>
> I now looked into what the printer can do (via its http admin page):
>
> 1) It has a NetBIOS node name / it supports the NetBIOS protocol
> 2) it supports LPD. It adds this info: "(send PC-Fax)" but I don't know
> what that means.

It sends you an email message with attached incoming fax TIF image file.

> Because of 1) can't I just install OS/2 NetBIOS support and the
> associated utitilies
> (resource browser for example) ?
> For NetBIOS you can also specify WINS server. Is that in any way
> relevant for OS/2 ?

Just some kind of NetBIOS name server (NBNS) in non-M$ language.

> If not 1), how about 2) ? I can see that there are LPD related daemons
> that come with OS/2 but again I am unsure on how to use these.

It's definitely possible - but could be slow.


Andreas

Alex Taylor

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Apr 23, 2012, 6:30:00 AM4/23/12
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On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 06:09:53 UTC, "Lars Erdmann" <lars.e...@arcor.de> wrote:

> I am reluctant to install SLPR as I don't have any experience with it.

Don't be, it is by far the simplest and least intrusive method.

(If you have eCS it is in fact probably installed already.)


> I now looked into what the printer can do (via its http admin page):
>
> 1) It has a NetBIOS node name / it supports the NetBIOS protocol

If that's the case it may work with Peer or with Samba (but both of those
require much more setup to deal with than SLPR).

> 2) it supports LPD.

This means it should work with SLPR, as well as with LPR and LPRPORTD.


> Because of 1) can't I just install OS/2 NetBIOS support and the associated
> utitilies (resource browser for example) ?

You probably could. Again, though, using SLPR or LPRPORTD is much, MUCH
simpler.


> For NetBIOS you can also specify WINS server. Is that in any way relevant
> for OS/2 ?

Probably not for your purposes.


> If not 1), how about 2) ? I can see that there are LPD related daemons
> that come with OS/2 but again I am unsure on how to use these.

That is exactly what SLPR is for. Also the older LPRPORTD, which is
less efficient and a bit more fiddly, but is almost certainly installed
on your system already even if SLPR isn't.


> By the way: I can configure the IP Address of the printer but I have the
> impression that it automatically received it through DHCP because the
> gateway is also correctly set and I never configured these values myself.

Once you plugged it into your network it would've picked up a DHCP address
automatically (from your router).


> In the TCP/IP config screen, it has this a selection box "Boot Method"
> with the following selections:
> AUTO (this is what is currently set)
> BOOTP
> DHCP
> RARP
> STATIC
> What in the world does "Boot Method" mean for a printer ? Or does it just
> mean how it receives its IP address when it is powered on ?

Yeah, that's what it means. Either set it to STATIC, or else leave it
as-is and configure your router to permanently reserve that IP address
for the printer's MAC address (probably the best option).


> It then has this additional checkbox:
> "Activate APIPA"
> What is "APIPA" ?

Never heard of it. I wouldn't worry about it. If you're really curious
it's probably explained somewhere in the printer's manual.


> What would be the most simple settings for a home network as I have it ?
> I don't plan to access this printer via the internet. I only want to use
> it inside the private IP range on the "private side of the router".

As above. Just see what address it's picked up via DHCP, and configure
your router to always give that address to the printer in the future.
Any router with a built-in DHCP server should offer such an option.



Anyway, you should be able to print a test file to the printer from a
command line (a text file should work, or a PostScript file if the
printer supports BR-Script as was implied elsewhere in the thread):

lpr -s <printer's IP address> -p * <file>

If it works then you should set up SLPR, or LPRPORTD if you're really
determined to avoid SLPR.

1. Open the properties notebook of the WPS printer object (create one if
you haven't already).

2. Go to the "Output port" page.


TO USE SLPR:

3. Select the "Install new port" button. If you see "SLPR" listed,
select it and click "Install".

If the "SLPR" is not visible, select the "New port drivers" radiobutton
and type in full path to where the file SLPR.PDR is located (usually it
is in ?:\OS2\DLL), then click on Refresh. The "SLPR" port option should
appear.

4. Double-click on the "SLPR1" port icon.

- For "LPD server": enter the IP address of the printer.
- For "LPD printer": if your printer defines a "queue name" (check its
LPD settings), enter that; if not, or if unsure, enter an asterisk "*".
- Select "LPRPORTD Compatible".
- Leave other settings at their defaults.

5. Close the printer properties.



TO USE LPRPORTD:

3. Double-click on the "\PIPE\LPD0" port icon.

- For "LPD server": enter the IP address of the printer.
- For "LPD printer": if your printer defines a "queue name" (check its
LPD settings), enter that; if not, or if unsure, enter an asterisk "*".

These next two are probably optional but I'm not 100% sure:
- For "Host name" enter your PC's TCP/IP hostname or IP address.
- For "User", AFAIK you can enter whatever you like.

- Leave other settings at their defaults.

4. Close the printer properties.

5. Open the TCP/IP Configuration Notebook and go to the Autostart page.
Select "lprportd" from the list, then choose "Autostart Service" with
"Detached".

Next, go to the "Printing" page and make sure that "Maximum Number of
LPD Ports" has a value of at least 1 (you can ignore the other fields).

Close the notebook and save changes.

It'll tell you to reboot, but you don't really need to -- just go to a
command prompt and run "detach lprportd".


EITHER METHOD:

6. Try printing something using the printer object!


--
Alex Taylor
Fukushima, Japan
http://www.altsan.org

Please take off hat when replying.

Rich Wonneberger

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Apr 23, 2012, 10:40:30 PM4/23/12
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Lars Erdmann wrote:
>
> It then has this additional checkbox:
> "Activate APIPA"
> What is "APIPA" ?
>

Automatic Private IP Addressing
Basicly its a non-routable IP address automatically assigned when there
is no DHCP server.
The address starts 169.254.x.x (iIrr) and uses a 16 bit sub-net mask.
255.255.0.0
The printer generates its own random address in the range.

I set up the SLPR port with eCS 1.0 & 1.2
Wasn't hard to set up & seemed to work OK.

Rich W.

David T. Johnson

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Apr 24, 2012, 10:51:41 AM4/24/12
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Lars Erdmann wrote: > Hallo, > I have an network capable printer. I also have a router (with integrated > DSL modem). > I have enabled the DHCP server in the router so that all computers > receive their IP address (and additional > network configuration: DNS server, default gateway etc.) automatically. > Questions: > 1) What do I have to do to make the network printer accessible under > OS/2 ? I admit I have never done that yet. > 2) How does the printer receive its IP address ? Since the IP address > can vary (when the lease expires ?), > how do I "abstract" access to the printer from other computers so that > the potential change in IP address won't matter ? > 3) the printer is the MFC-9460CDN from Brother. It says it can do PCL. > Does anyone have experience if the ordinary > PCL OS/2 printer driver will do ? I have a Brother 6050DN laserjet network printer running as a shared printer on my ethernet network with OS/2 MCP2. It works fine and is accessible from every wired and wireless device. To set it up I did the following: 1) Create a printer object for the new printer. In one of their last printer paks, IBM supplied a laserjet driver for the Brother 5050 printer that works fine with the 6050DN printer. 2) Install the slpr.pdr port from the printer object. IBM supplied this in a "SLPR.EXE" package. 3) Put the TCP/IP address for the printer in the "LPD Server" entry for the slpr dialong box. I left the "*" in the "LPD Printer" entry. 4) EDIT the TCPSTART.CMD file (in TCPIP/BIN folder) to remove the 'rem' for the lines: rem start lpd rem echo ..... LP Daemon Started After doing the above, any job printed on the new printer object will go to the printer at the tcp/ip address entered from any computer on the network, either wired or wireless. Posted with OS/2 Warp 4.52 and Sea Monkey 1.5a

Lars Erdmann

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May 2, 2012, 3:15:25 AM5/2/12
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Hallo, thanks to all who suggested to use slpr. That is indeed the most simple solution. 1) I did NOT enable lpd. It still works fine. 2) I specified the very same IP address for LPD Server and LPD Printer: the IP address of the printer 3) for my Brother MFC-9480CDN, I took the OS/2 PSCRIPT driver and imported the PPD file that came with the Windows printer. Works like a charm, I can print color etc. The only thing I had to do was to enable "PostScript level 1 compatibility" in the Job Properties. But this is a one time action if you do it from the printer object's general Job Properties section. Lars "David T. Johnson" <djoh...@isomedia.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:ArednSozLrTyIwvS...@posted.isomediainc... > Lars Erdmann wrote: >> Hallo, >> I have an network capable printer. I also have a router (with integrated >> DSL modem). >> I have enabled the DHCP server in the router so that all computers >> receive their IP address (and additional >> network configuration: DNS server, default gateway etc.) automatically. >> Questions: >> 1) What do I have to do to make the network printer accessible under OS/2 >> ? I admit I have never done that yet. >> 2) How does the printer receive its IP address ? Since the IP address can >> vary (when the lease expires ?), >> how do I "abstract" access to the printer from other computers so that >> the potential change in IP address won't matter ? >> 3) the printer is the MFC-9460CDN from Brother. It says it can do PCL. >> Does anyone have experience if the ordinary >> PCL OS/2 printer driver will do ? > I have a Brother 6050DN laserjet network printer running as a shared > printer on my ethernet network with OS/2 MCP2. It works fine and is > accessible from every wired and wireless device. To set it up I did the > following: > 1) Create a printer object for the new printer. In one of their last > printer paks, IBM supplied a laserjet driver for the Brother 5050 printer > that works fine with the 6050DN printer. > 2) Install the slpr.pdr port from the printer object. IBM supplied this > in a "SLPR.EXE" package. > 3) Put the TCP/IP address for the printer in the "LPD Server" entry for > the slpr dialong box. I left the "*" in the "LPD Printer" entry. > 4) EDIT the TCPSTART.CMD file (in TCPIP/BIN folder) to remove the 'rem' > for the lines: > rem start lpd > rem echo ..... LP Daemon Started > After doing the above, any job printed on the new printer object will go > to the printer at the tcp/ip address entered from any computer on the > network, either wired or wireless. > -- > Posted with OS/2 Warp 4.52 > and Sea Monkey 1.5a

David T. Johnson

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May 2, 2012, 10:50:59 AM5/2/12
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Lars Erdmann wrote: > Hallo, > thanks to all who suggested to use slpr. That is indeed the most simple > solution. > 1) I did NOT enable lpd. It still works fine. It's that LP daemon that 'wakes up' the printer when it's in deep sleep mode and you output a job to print. If the printer is already awake, then the LP daemon isn't needed. Or at least this is my conceptualization of what's going on. I've never taken the time to really test. Everything works and that's all that I care about. Posted with OS/2 Warp 4.52 and Sea Monkey 1.5a

Ruediger Ihle

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May 3, 2012, 1:48:26 AM5/3/12
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On Wed, 2 May 2012 14:50:59 UTC, "David T. Johnson" <djoh...@isomedia.com> wrote:

> It's that LP daemon that 'wakes up' the printer when it's in
> deep sleep mode and you output a job to print.

No, it's not. LPD is only needed if you want other clients
on your network to be able to print (via LPD protocol) on a
printer attached to your OS/2 machine. Not to confuse with
LPRPORTD, which was required by the old TCP/IP print subsystem
(prior to SLPR).


--
Ruediger "Rudi" Ihle [S&T Systemtechnik GmbH, Germany]
http://www.s-t.de

David T. Johnson

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May 3, 2012, 10:53:21 AM5/3/12
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Ruediger Ihle wrote: > On Wed, 2 May 2012 14:50:59 UTC, "David T. Johnson" <djoh...@isomedia.com> wrote: >> It's that LP daemon that 'wakes up' the printer when it's in >> deep sleep mode and you output a job to print. > No, it's not. LPD is only needed if you want other clients > on your network to be able to print (via LPD protocol) on a > printer attached to your OS/2 machine. Not to confuse with > LPRPORTD, which was required by the old TCP/IP print subsystem > (prior to SLPR). No doubt you are right but...if I do not run LPD, OS/2 is unable to wake my printer from its slumber. The print job just sits there with the printer sound asleep. If I run LPD, OS/2 is able to rouse the printer with a roar, just like other platforms, and start it printing. That may be an unintended consequence but...it works and so I don't give it any more thought. Posted with OS/2 Warp 4.52 and Sea Monkey 1.5a
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