Netware to Active Directory

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John Smith

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Nov 9, 2002, 11:52:51 PM11/9/02
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Good Evening Everybody.

I just got new assignment. I have to migrate from NDS (4x and 5x)
environment to Windows 2000 Active Directory. I am looking for white papers,
pdf files, knowledgebase articles, planning guide, utilities and books to
smoothly perform this migration. I'll appreciate if you guys can give me
some feedback so that I'll perform this without any big interruptions.

I have good understanding of Windows 2000 Active Directory. I have worked
with NDS (4 yrs ago) but I don't know how to perform this job. I am sure
that I can do it if there are proper resources available.

Please send me your comments, links, pdf files and white papers to do this
tas at iamcis...@hotmail.com

I'll appreciate if somebody can send me step by step migration plan.


Thank you,

John
iamcis...@hotmail.com


lsu...@mb.sympatico.ca

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Nov 10, 2002, 12:19:30 AM11/10/02
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Given that you cross-posted to an OS/2 networking group

You have my sympathy, but will not get much help

You will not be able to do it without disrupting your entire network

--
Lorne Sunley

Peter Moylan

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Nov 11, 2002, 4:32:14 AM11/11/02
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John Smith wrote:

> I just got new assignment. I have to migrate from NDS (4x and 5x)
> environment to Windows 2000 Active Directory.

You have our sympathy.

The main thing you need to do is get more powerful hardware, unless
you can train your users to accept a drop in performance.

The next thing to do is to find a newsgroup that has something
to do with Windows.

--
Peter Moylan pe...@ee.newcastle.edu.au
http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au

Bjørn Vermo

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Nov 11, 2002, 8:13:16 AM11/11/02
to iamcis...@hotmail.com
On Sun, 10 Nov 2002 04:52:51 GMT, John Smith <iamcis...@hotmail.com> wrote:

...


>
> Please send me your comments, links, pdf files and white papers to do
> this
> tas at iamcis...@hotmail.com
>
> I'll appreciate if somebody can send me step by step migration plan.
>

If it were my company, I would probably want to start by migrating the
managers responsible for the desision.

You will need new hardware, both for performance reasons and in order to
make a transition with as little disruption as possible.
You start by making an isolated test network for your new server, so you
can test your migration run with the inevitable problems it causes without
disrupting day to day activities.
This is important. I have never seen anything of this nature working
without nasty surprises, even with careful planning, and I've seen a few
migrations of different kinds over the last 30 years.

You will be well placed to get the blame when problems arise, so it is wise
of you to ask around for advise and document the process. Save the replies
you get to this enquiry, they may come in handy if your methods are
questioned. Keep a detailed work log for this project, including replies to
questions asked in your organization and references to external sources of
information.

I wish you the best of luck, but your target is something I would have
wanted to migrate AWAY from.

--
Bjørn Vermo

Mark H. Wood

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Nov 11, 2002, 9:08:31 AM11/11/02
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As others have mentioned, you'll probably want bigger, faster hardware
if Win2k is to bear the same load that your Netware setup carries
now. And being able to experiment with the Win2k setup while keeping
production on Netware, plus being able to fall back just by throwing a
few switches, will tend to minimize project-related hair loss.

Your users' current passwords are toast after the cutover. Prepare
your user base to receive all new passwords.

The JRB Utilities should be able to give you reports containing the
information you'll need to create new accounts to match the old ones,
and to re-establish any non-default file access controls and
user-based storage quotas. You should be able to beat these reports
into scripts which do all the hard work. If your user base is more
than a handful you will probably find even a single use worth the
money. www.jrbsoftware.com.

Get ready to repel lots of breakin attempts on a number of ports which
you never had to deal with in Netware.

Plan to spend more time trying to figure out ways of automating
routine system maintenance, since so many admin. activities are not
readily scriptable. You don't have to be a programmer as well, but it
helps, sometimes a lot. Programmer or not, try to get your hands on a
copy of the programming documentation (the "Platform SDK"), as it's
often the only way to find out what's *really* going on in MS Windows.

Also get the Windows 2000 Server Resource Kit -- the book is
occasionally useful, and the utilities which come with it are
essential.

--
Mark H. Wood, Lead System Programmer mw...@IUPUI.Edu
MS Windows *is* user-friendly, but only for certain values of "user".

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