Software patents become illegal in New Zealand

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Fritz Wuehler

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Mar 31, 2010, 9:08:08 PM3/31/10
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http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/news/thumbs-down-for-software-
patents-in-nz

The EU, one of the largest trading blocks in the world, already has
laws that explicitly forbid software patents. Now New Zealand has
stepped up to ban software patents forever, influenced by commentaries
by open-source advocates.

Who's next? China? India?

Rick

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Mar 31, 2010, 9:28:22 PM3/31/10
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.. hopefully the list will grow.

--
Rick

High Plains Thumper

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Apr 1, 2010, 1:55:55 AM4/1/10
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Rick wrote:
> Fritz Wuehler wrote:
>
>> http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/news/thumbs-down-for-software-patents-in-nz

>>
>> The EU, one of the largest trading blocks in the world, already has
>> laws that explicitly forbid software patents. Now New Zealand has
>> stepped up to ban software patents forever, influenced by
>> commentaries by open-source advocates.
>>
>> Who's next? China? India?
>
> .. hopefully the list will grow.

I don't see it happening to litigious US society, soon, unfortunately.

--
HPT

Roy Schestowitz

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Apr 2, 2010, 3:49:45 AM4/2/10
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-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

____/ High Plains Thumper on Thursday 01 Apr 2010 06:55 : \____

It's easier for software monopolists to subvert their own country's law.

- --
~~ Best of wishes

http://Schestowitz.com | Mandriva Linux | PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
run-level 2 Nov 17 02:36
http://iuron.com - help build a non-profit search engine
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High Plains Thumper

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Apr 2, 2010, 5:28:11 AM4/2/10
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Roy Schestowitz wrote:
> High Plains Thumper on Thursday:

>> Rick wrote:
>>> Fritz Wuehler wrote:
>>>
>>>> http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/news/thumbs-down-for-software-patents-in-nz
>>>>
>>>> The EU, one of the largest trading blocks in the world, already
>>>> has laws that explicitly forbid software patents. Now New
>>>> Zealand has stepped up to ban software patents forever,
>>>> influenced by commentaries by open-source advocates.
>>>>
>>>> Who's next? China? India?
>>>
>>> .. hopefully the list will grow.
>>
>> I don't see it happening to litigious US society, soon,
>> unfortunately.
>
> It's easier for software monopolists to subvert their own country's
> law.

I'm afraid that the US has more or less become a 3rd world country in
terms of justice and support of the wealthy in lieu of justice for all.

The other day I was looking at the software counter in a local department
store. I had a sense of sticker shock over the price of Windows 7. The
following is from Office Max, but IIRC prices were either on spot of
close (US pricing shown):

$119.99 - Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade
$199.99 - Windows 7 Professional Upgrade
$219.99 - Windows 7 Ultimate Upgrade

If what I read was correct on the box, one can upgrade from Windows XP to
Windows 7 using the upgrade version (US box). Only Professional or
Ultimate supports running legacy software.

Thus, one is left to entertain paying either $200 or $220 for upgrade (ouch!)

$199.99 - Windows 7 Home Premium Full Version
$299.99 - Windows 7 Professional Full Version
$319.99 - Windows 7 Ultimate Full Version

If one wants to add a third system to the home, then they are left with
paying $300 or $320 (another ouch!)

Problem I have encountered is that the initial versions of games
available for a new OS will run fine on one's cost effective hardware
upgrade (new mobo, RAM, CPU, etc.) About 2 years in, game sequel version
becomes more CPU intensive, requiring upgrading the hardware again. If
one opts for the cheaper OEM Windows version, it is tied to the hardware
and limits upgrade ability.

Thus, I am through with Windows altogether. XP is the last version for
me, I am through with the hardware / software upgrade cycle. Next
hardware upgrade cycle, I will stick with Linux and buy a commercial 3rd
party variant to WINE (Cedega, etc.). Then run commercial software in
that environment under Linux.

From a cost and security standpoint, it makes more sense to break the
monopoly lock in.

--
HPT

Joel

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Apr 2, 2010, 7:30:34 AM4/2/10
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High Plains Thumper <h...@invalid.invalid> wrote:

>If what I read was correct on the box, one can upgrade from Windows XP to
>Windows 7 using the upgrade version (US box). Only Professional or
>Ultimate supports running legacy software.


Only if "legacy" means 16-bit software, *on 64-bit Windows*,
specifically - Pro and Ultimate/Enterprise can run XP Mode, which is a
32-bit VM. 32-bit Windows 7, any edition, runs 16-bit software the
same way older 32-bit Windows versions did.


>Problem I have encountered is that the initial versions of games
>available for a new OS will run fine on one's cost effective hardware
>upgrade (new mobo, RAM, CPU, etc.) About 2 years in, game sequel version
>becomes more CPU intensive, requiring upgrading the hardware again. If
>one opts for the cheaper OEM Windows version, it is tied to the hardware
>and limits upgrade ability.


Try not taking the licensing literally - in reality, they will let you
change motherboards with the System Builder OEM copies. The licensing
language is just a really complex way of saying that you won't get
*tech support* if you change motherboards (legalese/disclaimer), but
since you would have bought the System Builder copy on your own, for
use as a virtual retail copy, you wouldn't have had access to tech
support in the first place. I bought both my copies from Newegg in
the System Builder form.

--
Joel Crump

Terry Porter

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Apr 2, 2010, 8:12:42 AM4/2/10
to
On Fri, 02 Apr 2010 03:28:11 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:

<snip>

> The other day I was looking at the software counter in a local
> department store. I had a sense of sticker shock over the price of
> Windows 7. The following is from Office Max, but IIRC prices were
> either on spot of close (US pricing shown):
>
> $119.99 - Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade $199.99 - Windows 7
> Professional Upgrade $219.99 - Windows 7 Ultimate Upgrade

That a lot of money to pay for a operating system that is so insecure, it
should be banned from use on computers worldwide.

If Microsoft sold plagues they would have a similar pricing structure.

$119.99 - Black Death Home Premium Upgrade
$199.99 - Typhus Professional Upgrade
$219.99 - Ebola Ultimate Upgrade


--
This machine running Gnu/Linux Mint 8 and posting via Pan.
Get your Free copy NOW! http://linuxmint.com/

Joel

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Apr 2, 2010, 8:39:20 AM4/2/10
to
Terry Porter <lin...@netspace.net.au> wrote:

>That a lot of money to pay for a operating system that is so insecure, it
>should be banned from use on computers worldwide.
>
>If Microsoft sold plagues they would have a similar pricing structure.
>
>$119.99 - Black Death Home Premium Upgrade
>$199.99 - Typhus Professional Upgrade
>$219.99 - Ebola Ultimate Upgrade


There's that nice guy Chris A. was fawning over! <3

Christ, what a bunch of insanity. "Banned from use" - truly stupid.

--
Joel Crump

chrisv

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Apr 2, 2010, 8:50:52 AM4/2/10
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High Plains Thumper wrote:

>The other day I was looking at the software counter in a local department
>store. I had a sense of sticker shock over the price of Windows 7. The
>following is from Office Max, but IIRC prices were either on spot of
>close (US pricing shown):
>
>$119.99 - Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade
>$199.99 - Windows 7 Professional Upgrade
>$219.99 - Windows 7 Ultimate Upgrade
>
>If what I read was correct on the box, one can upgrade from Windows XP to
>Windows 7 using the upgrade version (US box). Only Professional or
>Ultimate supports running legacy software.
>
>Thus, one is left to entertain paying either $200 or $220 for upgrade (ouch!)
>
>$199.99 - Windows 7 Home Premium Full Version
>$299.99 - Windows 7 Professional Full Version
>$319.99 - Windows 7 Ultimate Full Version
>
>If one wants to add a third system to the home, then they are left with
>paying $300 or $320 (another ouch!)

Well, the full retail versions are heinously priced, but Home Premium
OEM is available for $100 online... My daughter runs it, and hasn't
had problems with software working.

I don't have an issue with the price, really. It's always been the
evil, and the poor security, that I've objected to.

Chris Ahlstrom

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Apr 2, 2010, 8:54:28 AM4/2/10
to
Terry Porter pulled this Usenet boner:

> On Fri, 02 Apr 2010 03:28:11 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:
>
> <snip>
>> The other day I was looking at the software counter in a local
>> department store. I had a sense of sticker shock over the price of
>> Windows 7. The following is from Office Max, but IIRC prices were
>> either on spot of close (US pricing shown):
>>
>> $119.99 - Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade $199.99 - Windows 7
>> Professional Upgrade $219.99 - Windows 7 Ultimate Upgrade
>
> That a lot of money to pay for a operating system that is so insecure, it
> should be banned from use on computers worldwide.
>
> If Microsoft sold plagues they would have a similar pricing structure.
>
> $119.99 - Black Death Home Premium Upgrade
> $199.99 - Typhus Professional Upgrade
> $219.99 - Ebola Ultimate Upgrade

Ya got me cryin' blood, man!

--
When you are about to die, a wombat is better than no company at all.
-- Roger Zelazny, "Doorways in the Sand"

Moshe

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Apr 2, 2010, 11:46:24 AM4/2/10
to
On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 08:54:28 -0400, Chris Ahlstrom wrote:

> Terry Porter pulled this Usenet boner:
>
>> On Fri, 02 Apr 2010 03:28:11 -0600, High Plains Thumper wrote:
>>
>> <snip>
>>> The other day I was looking at the software counter in a local
>>> department store. I had a sense of sticker shock over the price of
>>> Windows 7. The following is from Office Max, but IIRC prices were
>>> either on spot of close (US pricing shown):
>>>
>>> $119.99 - Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade $199.99 - Windows 7
>>> Professional Upgrade $219.99 - Windows 7 Ultimate Upgrade
>>
>> That a lot of money to pay for a operating system that is so insecure, it
>> should be banned from use on computers worldwide.
>>
>> If Microsoft sold plagues they would have a similar pricing structure.
>>
>> $119.99 - Black Death Home Premium Upgrade
>> $199.99 - Typhus Professional Upgrade
>> $219.99 - Ebola Ultimate Upgrade
>
> Ya got me cryin' blood, man!

Maybe you should try using some KY Jelly next time, Chris
Ahlstrom.

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