monotonic [clock millis] and [after]?

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Petro Kazmirchuk

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Jul 7, 2021, 4:43:05 PMJul 7
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the subject pretty much says it all. Probably, it is not part of the core, but is there an extension that provides monotonic [clock millis] i.e. independent of DST adjustments? (analogous to Python's time.monotonic)
My use case is very simple: I'm connecting to a TCP server, and in case the connection fails, I'd like to wait a bit before connecting again. I noticed the ancient TIP 302, but it is talking only about [after], and in any case I need it in Tcl 8.6
Or can I work around it myself using only Tcl? I'm writing an open source extension that is supposed to be pure Tcl, no C code.
thanks in advance

Robert Heller

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Jul 7, 2021, 5:22:21 PMJul 7
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clock milliseconds

man 3tcl clock

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Petro Kazmirchuk

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Jul 8, 2021, 6:19:42 AMJul 8
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indeed I didn't realize [clock seconds/milliseconds] is not affected by DST, silly me :)

Donal K. Fellows

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Jul 17, 2021, 4:29:59 AMJul 17
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On Wednesday, 7 July 2021 at 21:43:05 UTC+1, Petro Kazmirchuk wrote:
> the subject pretty much says it all. Probably, it is not part of the core, but is there an extension that provides monotonic [clock millis] i.e. independent of DST adjustments?

The real issue isn't whether DST adjustments will have an impact (they shouldn't; timezones are about how timestamps are rendered, not when they are) but whether actually altering the clock will have an impact. I don't have a significant problem with my own stuff because I always enable NTP on my systems (limiting clock drift) but I understand that's not practical for all.

Donal.
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