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Franklin Chang

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Jul 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/26/99
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Hi,

I'm just wondering if there is a general way to run a program on unix,
and have tk windows show up on a mac which is hooked up through TCP/IP or
some other means. Basically there is a program that I'm using which uses
tk which I would like to be able to run from home on a mac, but at the
same time, keeping the computationally intense stuff on the unix server.

I'm a newbie with regards to tcl/tk, so any help (general places to
look) would be appreciated.

Franklin

Bill Schongar

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Jul 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/26/99
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Franklin Chang wrote:

> I'm just wondering if there is a general way to run a program on unix,
>and have tk windows show up on a mac which is hooked up through TCP/IP or
>some other means. Basically there is a program that I'm using which uses
>tk which I would like to be able to run from home on a mac, but at the
>same time, keeping the computationally intense stuff on the unix server.


The easy route would be an X server/ X session emulator for Mac. I've
never actually used one, but I know of a couple..

MacX, Apple
MI/X, ?? (Freeware)
XTen, Tenon Inter-something-or-other
eXodus, White Pine

When in doubt, try the freeware one first. : )

-Bill Schongar
bi...@lcdmultimedia.com


Collin Starkweather

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Jul 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/26/99
to Franklin Chang
The quickest and easiest way would be to install an xterm emulator on
your PC at home. I'm not familiar with Mac, but there is a free PC (and
may or may not be a Mac) xterm emulator available at

http://www.microimages.com

You open the xterm on your home machine, then from your unix prompt
(i.e., you have to telnet in), you identify an IP where you want output
to go with a command such as (this is ksh):

env DISPLAY=158.128.173.70:0.0 xterm &

where 158.128.173.70 would be the IP address that your machine at home
picks up from your ISP.

Now you can just run the Tcl/Tk/Perl apps from your xterm as if you are
at work.

If you are going to do this, I recommend you invest the $25/month in a
fast line if you haven't already done so.

Hope this helps,

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Collin Starkweather (303) 492-4784
University of Colorado collin.st...@colorado.edu
Department of Economics http://ucsu.colorado.edu/~olsonco
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Franklin Chang wrote:
>
> Hi,


>
> I'm just wondering if there is a general way to run a program on unix,
> and have tk windows show up on a mac which is hooked up through TCP/IP or
> some other means. Basically there is a program that I'm using which uses
> tk which I would like to be able to run from home on a mac, but at the
> same time, keeping the computationally intense stuff on the unix server.
>

Cameron Laird

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Jul 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/26/99
to

In article <379c...@News.Destek.net>,
Bill Schongar <bi...@lcdmultimedia.com> wrote:

>Franklin Chang wrote:
>
>> I'm just wondering if there is a general way to run a program on unix,
>>and have tk windows show up on a mac which is hooked up through TCP/IP or
>>some other means. Basically there is a program that I'm using which uses
>>tk which I would like to be able to run from home on a mac, but at the
>>same time, keeping the computationally intense stuff on the unix server.
>
>
>The easy route would be an X server/ X session emulator for Mac. I've
>never actually used one, but I know of a couple..
>
> MacX, Apple
> MI/X, ?? (Freeware)
> XTen, Tenon Inter-something-or-other
> eXodus, White Pine
>
>When in doubt, try the freeware one first. : )
.
.
.
X service for MacOS is indeed an interesting topic. My
guess, though, is that Mr. Chang's requirements might be
met even more easily. Let me understand the situation:
you don't want to change the existing Tk application, is
that correct? You want it to continue running just as
it's doing, but have its display show up at home? There
might be a rabbit in that hat.
--

Cameron Laird http://starbase.neosoft.com/~claird/home.html
cla...@NeoSoft.com +1 281 996 8546 FAX

lvi...@cas.org

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Jul 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/27/99
to

According to Collin Starkweather <collin.st...@colorado.edu>:
:your PC at home. I'm not familiar with Mac, but there is a free PC (and

:may or may not be a Mac) xterm emulator available at

I think I just read that one is no longer free...

--
<URL: mailto:lvi...@cas.org> Quote: Saving the world before bedtime.
<*> O- <URL: http://www.purl.org/NET/lvirden/>
Unless explicitly stated to the contrary, nothing in this posting
should be construed as representing my employer's opinions.

Franklin Chang

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Jul 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/27/99
to

Hi,

Thanks to all the folks who responded.

In article <379CD65C...@colorado.edu>, Collin Starkweather
<collin.st...@colorado.edu> wrote:

>The quickest and easiest way would be to install an xterm emulator on

>your PC at home. I'm not familiar with Mac, but there is a free PC (and
>may or may not be a Mac) xterm emulator available at
>

> http://www.microimages.com

An X windows emulator was more than I needed, but I did download it
(since I have been looking for a freeware mac X windows emulator for a
while). It seems like you need a faster connection to use this though. I
did get the program _wish_ to work with it, but I wasn't able to get the
simulator program that I want to use to work properly. I suspect that I
need to add more fonts to the database to get the simulator window to show
up. But still, it took 10 minutes for the simulator window to not show up
(meanwhile I couldn't do anything).


Another solution that someone suggested is to use the virtual network
computing system at
http://www.uk.research.att.com/vnc/

I haven't been able to test this out, because my browser doesn't seem to
like their download page (maybe I need javasomething). I suspect that
this solution will also depend on having a relatively fast connection.


In article
<EB24E45D0C1618B6.33CFBD44...@lp.airnews.net>,


cla...@starbase.neosoft.com (Cameron Laird) wrote:
> .
>X service for MacOS is indeed an interesting topic. My
>guess, though, is that Mr. Chang's requirements might be
>met even more easily. Let me understand the situation:
>you don't want to change the existing Tk application, is
>that correct? You want it to continue running just as
>it's doing, but have its display show up at home? There
>might be a rabbit in that hat.

I would prefer a solution which doesn't require extra coding, but I do
have access to the code, and I was sort of wondering if it is possible to
add some "socket" or something to transmit tk commands between the unix
machine and my macintosh. Then mactk program would deal with the views
over here. I'm still interested in a solution like this, if anyone has
any suggestions.

Franklin

>Franklin Chang wrote:
>>
>> Hi,


>>
>> I'm just wondering if there is a general way to run a program on unix,
>> and have tk windows show up on a mac which is hooked up through TCP/IP or
>> some other means. Basically there is a program that I'm using which uses
>> tk which I would like to be able to run from home on a mac, but at the
>> same time, keeping the computationally intense stuff on the unix server.
>>

Alexandre Ferrieux

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Jul 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/27/99
to
Franklin Chang wrote:
>
>
> >> I'm just wondering if there is a general way to run a program on unix,
> >> and have tk windows show up on a mac which is hooked up through TCP/IP or
> >> some other means. Basically there is a program that I'm using which uses
> >> tk which I would like to be able to run from home on a mac, but at the
> >> same time, keeping the computationally intense stuff on the unix server.
> >>
> >> I'm a newbie with regards to tcl/tk, so any help (general places to
> >> look) would be appreciated.
>
> [suggestions with X and VNC]

>
> I would prefer a solution which doesn't require extra coding, but I do
> have access to the code, and I was sort of wondering if it is possible to
> add some "socket" or something to transmit tk commands between the unix
> machine and my macintosh. Then mactk program would deal with the views
> over here. I'm still interested in a solution like this, if anyone has
> any suggestions.

Your intuition here is good. The whole problem is that of thin/thick
clients. X and VNC are thin "clients" (for X it is called a server :),
i.e. they are relatively small and generic apps that do nothing but UI,
and let the other side do all the hard work. The problem is, the thinner
the client, the thicker the bandwidth needed: when you display hi-res
pictures on X or VNC, you realize this. (VNC is younger than X, hence it
didn't repeat some mistakes so it is slightly more efficient). A thicker
client is eg a web browser that displays a jpeg: more code on the client
side (jpeg decoder), fewer bytes on the line.

IOW, the higher the level of abstraction in the transmission protocol,
the lower the required bandwidth, at some cost in genericity and code
size on the client. Since in your case you seemed to be prepared to pay
that (sligh) cost, I'll encourage you to do what you suggest: use (the
receive side of) [send] on platforms that support it, and write your
own on others (with a listener socket, fileevent, eval). You'll be glad
you did !

-Alex

Stefaan A Eeckels

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Jul 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/27/99
to
In article <f-chang-2707...@glock-1.slip.uiuc.edu>,

f-c...@uiuc.edu (Franklin Chang) writes:
> I would prefer a solution which doesn't require extra coding, but I do
> have access to the code, and I was sort of wondering if it is possible to
> add some "socket" or something to transmit tk commands between the unix
> machine and my macintosh. Then mactk program would deal with the views
> over here. I'm still interested in a solution like this, if anyone has
> any suggestions.
This is not a generic solution, but it might be of interest
nonetheless.

I've got a UNIX daemon that reads commands from a named pipe,
and also sends status information to the pipe (about once
per second).
It has both a command line (shell), and a Tcl/Tk interface.
When I had a similar request, I wrote a little program that
mediates between sockets and the named pipe. The modifications
to the Tcl/Tk program to get it to open the socket instead of
a named pipe, were pretty minimal.
If the interface to the UNIX program is simple, then this
solution will work nicely on slow connections.

--
Stefaan
--

PGP key available from PGP key servers (http://www.pgp.net/pgpnet/)
___________________________________________________________________
Perfection is reached, not when there is no longer anything to add,
but when there is no longer anything to take away. -- Saint-Exupéry


Cameron Laird

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Aug 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/3/99
to

In article <f-chang-2707...@glock-1.slip.uiuc.edu>,
Franklin Chang <f-c...@uiuc.edu> wrote:
.
.

.
>Another solution that someone suggested is to use the virtual network
>computing system at
>http://www.uk.research.att.com/vnc/
>
>I haven't been able to test this out, because my browser doesn't seem to
>like their download page (maybe I need javasomething). I suspect that
>this solution will also depend on having a relatively fast connection.
.
.
.
There's been an explosion of interest in VNC <URL:http://
starbase.neosoft.com/~claird/comp.windows.misc/VNC.html>
lately. Downloading should work for you; persevere. Also,
while it *is* often bandwidth-throttled, I predict you'll
find its performance better than you expect.

On the other hand, X-on-MacOS is also a fine solution. And,
like several of the other respondents, I've had a lot of
fine doing minor rewrites of Tcl and Tk applications to make
them network-savvy. The goal you describe is within your
grasp. Go for it.

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