Logitech m2: hello anyone out there?

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Carl Glassberg

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Jan 14, 2012, 5:24:16 PM1/14/12
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Hello:

Is there anyone here using Logitech 3.40 or a more recent version?

1) I am wondering if anyone has upgraded to the latest version?
2) Is there still active support for it?

I contacted Logitech but Modula-2 doesn't appear in the product
support pages.

Carl Glassberg

Chris Burrows

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Jan 15, 2012, 8:21:23 AM1/15/12
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"Carl Glassberg" <carlgl...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:33ea5e86-9ba0-48c4...@s6g2000pbi.googlegroups.com...
TERRA Datentechnik have it listed on their website:

http://www.terraterra.ch/modula-2/index.html

Chris Burrows
CFB Software
http://www.cfbsoftware.com/modula2


Martin Brown

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Jan 27, 2012, 11:40:02 AM1/27/12
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On 15/01/2012 13:21, Chris Burrows wrote:
> "Carl Glassberg"<carlgl...@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:33ea5e86-9ba0-48c4...@s6g2000pbi.googlegroups.com...
>> Hello:
>>
>> Is there anyone here using Logitech 3.40 or a more recent version?
>>
>> 1) I am wondering if anyone has upgraded to the latest version?
>> 2) Is there still active support for it?
>>
>> I contacted Logitech but Modula-2 doesn't appear in the product
>> support pages.
>>
>> Carl Glassberg
>
> TERRA Datentechnik have it listed on their website:
>
> http://www.terraterra.ch/modula-2/index.html

Amazed they are still selling it. Well past its sell by date now!!!
(it was looking fairly pedestrian on x86 kit even in the 90's)

Unless you are extremely wedded to a prehistoric slow multipass compiler
it would make sense to take a look at XDS as an alternative.
ISTR that is now free and a slightly improved version is out.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown

Carl Glassberg

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Mar 19, 2012, 4:29:24 PM3/19/12
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Thanks everyone for the feedback!

Anyone have an opinion of the ADW/Stony Brook m2 system?
It supports both 32-bit and 64-bit processors (Intel/Windows O/S).

Probably should have put this as a new topic.

Carl
---

On Jan 27, 9:40 am, Martin Brown <|||newspam...@nezumi.demon.co.uk>
wrote:
> On 15/01/2012 13:21, Chris Burrows wrote:

> > "Carl Glassberg"<carlglassb...@gmail.com>  wrote in message

Chris Burrows

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Mar 19, 2012, 5:22:03 PM3/19/12
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> "Carl Glassberg" <carlgl...@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:a97f610a-5432-4de7...@z5g2000pbu.googlegroups.com...
> Thanks everyone for the feedback!

> Anyone have an opinion of the ADW/Stony Brook m2 system?
> It supports both 32-bit and 64-bit processors (Intel/Windows O/S).

> Probably should have put this as a new topic.

See the reply to my post "Two new Modula-2 releases" on 30 Dec 2011 in this
newsgroup,

Chris




magicmo...@gmail.com

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Apr 11, 2017, 2:14:15 AM4/11/17
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The ADW compiler is a slightly tweaked version of the fabulous Stony Brook M2 compiler. I built many fantastic products using the stony brook compiler. It was incredibly fast, and had only a few tiny errors. the ADW people have fixed most of the remaining tiny errors, and it is a near perfect product. Incredibly fast, and tiny executables. It runs circles around Java and other more ponderous languages. Too bad people don't value simplicity and clarity as much as billable hours!

Rob Solomon

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Dec 6, 2020, 11:43:05 AM12/6/20
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On Mon, 10 Apr 2017 23:14:15 -0700 (PDT), magicmo...@gmail.com
wrote:

>The ADW compiler is a slightly tweaked version of the fabulous Stony Brook M2 compiler. I built many fantastic products using the stony brook compiler. It was incredibly fast, and had only a few tiny errors. the ADW people have fixed most of the remaining tiny errors, and it is a near perfect product. Incredibly fast, and tiny executables. It runs circles around Java and other more ponderous languages. Too bad people don't value simplicity and clarity as much as billable hours!

Are you still using it? Does it still work for you?

I had a disk crash and to reinstall everything. The latest version of
ADW M2 doesn't link successfully. I'm getting an error saying that
WIN32 and WINUSER need to be compiled.

Have you also seen this? Have you been able to work around it?

Thx

Edward De Jong

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Dec 6, 2020, 9:09:03 PM12/6/20
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I used Modula-2 to make a long series of products over 20 years.
It was a supremely robust language with so many checks, which means fewer errors and reliable software.
however, in the world of graphics and web, not having variable length strings in the language is a huge hindrance.
I switched to using ObjectiveC for making iOS apps. Really there was only 1 language from Apple for this task.
Now there is a second language, Swift, which is very complex.

I then started to make web stuff, and found that you had to use Javascript, which is entirely different from these other languages.
Javascript is full of "bombs". With dynamic typing you can inadvertently change something from a number to a string.

Anyway i got fed up with the lack of an airtight language, so i built what i hope Prof. Wirth would appreciate, an evolution of Modula-2, called Beads.

Beads is very similar to Modula-2 in terms of syntax and philosophy, although i migrated from semicolon statement delimiting to indent significant format (like Python).

• It is a strongly typed language (with implicit typing) with a more modern set of primitive types: number, string, bitmap image, sound, movie, regular expression, etc. The implicit typing means if you say var a = "hello", we can infer that a is of type string, saves typing.
• it has a graphic model built into the syntax, so you can subdivide the screen into subareas, and thus build very complex screen layouts in the language itself. So unlike HTML/JS/CSS you have full IF statements and variables to construct the layout.

The compiler is free at beadslang.com. It is primarily intended for making graphical interactive software, for client or server, and currently exists as a transpiler, that emits either JS or AS3/Haxe.

It has protected arithmetic, and a full graphical/event model in the language, so you can build a graphical app only using the language and about 2 dozen std library calls to draw. It is the only thing i know of that returns graphical programming to the simple world that Modula-2 and other 70's languages like Basic was all about.

For those Modula-2 lovers, I encourage you to take it for a spin, and let me know how close i hit the target, which was to evolve Modula-2 towards the modern era; retain strong typing with robust compile time and runtime checks, but permit modern things to be built.

It has some unique features that weren't possible due to resource limitations at the time of Modula-2. Such as the ability to know when data changes; if you draw a widget that depends on a state variable "temperature", when that variable changes value, the widget using that variable is automatically scheduled for refresh. This ability to track values, means you can reverse the system for debugging. This is a high overhead feature, but is invaluable for recreating rarely occurring error states.


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