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can anyone offer Lisp job?

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Alex Mizrahi

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Apr 9, 2005, 6:05:11 PM4/9/05
to
hello

i would like to have some remote, not so big, complex or urgent job in
Common Lisp. since i live in Ukraine, fee could be surprisingly low as for
USA/EU-living people. :)

i don't have much experience with Common Lisp, but i estimate my general
programming skills as quite high (i was among the best students in
nation-wide ACM programming contests and other contests, for example), and i
have no problems hacking different Lisp libs and implementations (as i
remember, i helped to fix some bugs in ECL and ABCL, and found one in
CormanLisp's code, don't know if it's fixed :)), so i think i can cope with
almost any job.
i have some experience in lots of different technologies, including
web-related stuff, SQL, 3D graphics (especially OpenGL), COM, Win32 API,
low-level code optimizations etc.

i estimate my chances of getting any Lisp-related job as very low, but maybe
someone can offer such, so i'll get proof that lisp is not dead :) ?

(actually i would like to participate in some interesting projects, like
writting Common Lisp implementation for .NET with innovative features,
advanced IDE, lib for web-programming etc., but all people need to eat :(,
so i have to search for job, and jobs that are not connected with Lisp are
much more boring as i feel :))

with best regards, Alex 'killer_storm' Mizrahi.


Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t

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Apr 17, 2005, 5:45:12 PM4/17/05
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> From: "Alex Mizrahi" <udod...@users.sourceforge.net>

> i would like to have some remote, not so big, complex or urgent job
> in Common Lisp. since i live in Ukraine, fee could be surprisingly
> low as for USA/EU-living people. :)

I live in California and would be willing to work for the legal minimum
wage, something like $5something/hour. I have 15 years Lisp programming
experience. Would you be willing to undercut my wage-bid?

> i don't have much experience with Common Lisp

It sounds like you have less than one year Common Lisp experience,
is that a correct assessent? Accordingly:
Would you be willing to work for less than one dollar per hour,
in rough proportion to your lesser amount of experience than I have?

Do you have experience writing WebServer applictions using Common Lisp?
I do. I have an online demo I made when I first started CGI/CL
programming near the 2000/2001 boundary.
http://shell.rawbw.com/~rem/cgi-bin/topscript.cgi
Do you have a demo of your CGI/CL programming to compare to mine?

Brandon J. Van Every

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Apr 17, 2005, 7:37:08 PM4/17/05
to
rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) wrote in
news:REM-2005...@Yahoo.Com:

>> From: "Alex Mizrahi" <udod...@users.sourceforge.net>
>> i would like to have some remote, not so big, complex or urgent job
>> in Common Lisp. since i live in Ukraine, fee could be surprisingly
>> low as for USA/EU-living people. :)
>
> I live in California and would be willing to work for the legal
> minimum wage, something like $5something/hour. I have 15 years Lisp
> programming experience. Would you be willing to undercut my wage-bid?

Selling yourself so low, I think most people would (quite rightly)
believe that they'd get what they pay for. I do not suggest "I'm super
cheap" as a business model. I would suggest the newsgroup
misc.business.consulting if you want a serious education in business
models. If this is patronizing, well, I can't fathom how you could
acquire 15 years of practical Lisp experience and presently be willing
to work for $5/hour in the USA. It seems like your argument is either
completely disingenuous, or else, well, nobody in their right mind would
hire you.

I mean geez, I've made $8/hour registering voters, $12/hour
scrubbing floors, $15/hour painting apartments, $17/hour on heavy yard
work, and $20/hour gathering signatures when it's going well.

So where's my own business model? Honestly, I still don't have one. My
goal is to be paid to program on my own terms. But my terms don't quite
agree with what the game industry wants. Oh well, I plod along, using
the "day jobs" to fund what I actually want to be doing. At least in
programming and game design, I do what I want to do.


--
Cheers, www.indiegamedesign.com
Brandon Van Every Seattle, WA

"The pioneer is the one with the arrows in his back."
- anonymous entrepreneur

Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t

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Apr 18, 2005, 2:33:43 PM4/18/05
to
> From: "Brandon J. Van Every" <mylastname...@mycompanyname.com>
> Selling yourself so low,

No, I'm desperately *trying* to "sell myself", but so-far no companies
are willing to hire people in the USA to write computer software
because even at the legal minimum wage we're still more expensive than
people in India, so all computer-programming work is being farmed out
to shops in India.

I'm desperately hoping some company in the USA will realize that the
overhead in dealing with people who no spekka ingish widout badd aksent
and live so far away it takes an international long distance phone call
to talk to them live (as if that did any good with their accent), and
whose documentation is illegible due to lack of English skills, is just
not worth dealing with just to shave a couple dollars off the
already-low minimum wage here in the USA.

Or if nobody is willing to pay me to write the actual software,
somebody could hire me to re-do all the broken-English documentation
produced by the Indians who wrote the software, so that customers can
understand it instead of having to call customer support and talk to a
live Indian who is unintelligible and makes the customer abandon the
product and never again buy from that company.

> I think most people would (quite rightly) believe that they'd get
> what they pay for.

If that's your best opinion, then *you* are a fucking idiot who doesn't
know the difference between cost and value. I do good work, but I can't
legally work at a lower hourly wage than the people in India do.

Also if your remark is applied to the Indians, then it contradicts the
fact that companies are outsourcing their software work, and even their
customer-support work, to India, in order to pay even lower wages than
I ask. Why don't they consider the workers in India to be only worth
what they pay for, per your statement?? Why are Indians working for
below-minimum-wage considered a bargain whereas Americans such as
myself willing to work at minimum wage considered worthless?

> I do not suggest "I'm super cheap" as a business model.

Fuck you! That "business model" works fine for Indians. They're
currently getting all the jobs that Americans used to get. If that
business model works, why don't you suggest it?

> I can't fathom how you could acquire 15 years of practical Lisp
> experience and presently be willing to work for $5/hour in the USA.

I'd like to work for more, but no paying work whatsoever is available
during this recession, so I'm making the best offer I can legally make
in the hope of competing (if and when the recession ever lightens) with
the Indians who currently have all the jobs.

> It seems like your argument is either completely disingenuous, or
> else, well, nobody in their right mind would hire you.

You have a fucking stupid attitude. I'm telling the truth. I have 15
years experience programming in Lisp (and 7 years experience in other
programming languages). I'm very good at programming. Anyone who would
hire me to do the kind of work I am good at doing would get a true
bargain, good work at low cost. Somebody hiring me would be very much
in "right mind". It's the people like you, who conclude since I got
laid off during a recession and am still unemployed that I must be
worthless, who are not in their right mind.

> I've made $8/hour registering voters

That's basically a sales position, harassing random people to try to
get them to spend time doing something for you, right? Or do you just
sit waiting for people to come to you? I've never seen such paying work
offered around here. How do I apply?

> $12/hour scrubbing floors
> $15/hour painting apartments
> $17/hour on heavy yard work

I have a flattened spinal disk, so I probably couldn't do such work on
any regular basis, like more than an hour a day for the first two, or
ten minutes for the last. A few years ago when I was moving to a new
apartment, all by myself, no help from anyone, at the end I accidently
twisted my back and for the next three days I was unable to get out of
bed except by spending a full hour maneuvering over to hands and knees
whereupon I could finally crawl but not stand up.

> $20/hour gathering signatures when it's going well.

Definitely "sales" job, harassing people to spend their time for no
benefit to them. Is there any money for gathering signatures for a
petition to outlaw hiring overseas workers for less than the legal
minimum wage in the USA? I think I could "get into that".

Christopher C. Stacy

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Apr 18, 2005, 3:18:44 PM4/18/05
to
rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) writes:

> I'm desperately hoping some company in the USA will realize that the
> overhead in dealing with people who no spekka ingish widout badd aksent
> and live so far away it takes an international long distance phone call
> to talk to them live (as if that did any good with their accent), and
> whose documentation is illegible due to lack of English skills, is just
> not worth dealing with just to shave a couple dollars off the
> already-low minimum wage here in the USA.
>
> Or if nobody is willing to pay me to write the actual software,
> somebody could hire me to re-do all the broken-English documentation
> produced by the Indians who wrote the software, so that customers can
> understand it instead of having to call customer support and talk to a
> live Indian who is unintelligible and makes the customer abandon the
> product and never again buy from that company.

I don't think desperate hope is a rational approach to the problem of
outsourcing. Long-distance phone calls are not expensive, and my
limited recent experience with calling customer support in India
is that they were perfectly intelligable. As for actually being
able to help me, They were just as useful as the USA people.
(Which means of course, not very helpful at all. LINKSYS sucks.)

I haven't had the pleasure of reading any Indian-produced documentation
that I know of. I suspect that it would be hard to make it any worse
than most documentation that I've ever had to suffer through.
But if that's being outsourced to India, that means less opportunity
for a chance at someone writing good documentation here,
which has been known to happen on occasion.

Software-wise, I don't know how they're doing lately. I've heard
plenty of horror stories about both quality and team communication
over the last 5 years. But I expect that as they gain more people
with experience, this will improve. I see no reason to believe
that such a vast pool of extraordinatily motivated people will
not be able to compete just as well as us, globally, in English.

I haven't thought about why it is that te USA has enjoyed such
a lead in the software market. I assume it mostly has to do
with our education system, and the general leg-up from our
wealth compared to the less developed nations like India.
Japan tried and failed in the 1980s, perhaps due to cultural
differences. Now India is becoming serious competition.

I don't know exactly what we ought to do differently to continue
to dominate this market, but desperately hoping that the folks
in India won't improve their capabilities isn't the answer.

Ulrich Hobelmann

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Apr 18, 2005, 3:34:15 PM4/18/05
to
Christopher C. Stacy wrote:
> I don't think desperate hope is a rational approach to the problem of
> outsourcing. Long-distance phone calls are not expensive, and my
> limited recent experience with calling customer support in India
> is that they were perfectly intelligable. As for actually being
> able to help me, They were just as useful as the USA people.
> (Which means of course, not very helpful at all. LINKSYS sucks.)

Intelligible, no. I even find it hard to understand Indian
professors in Wisconsin (ok, I'm not native...).

Readable, yes (Amazon seems to have their email customer support
in India or Pakistan, judging by the name under the email).

> I haven't thought about why it is that te USA has enjoyed such
> a lead in the software market. I assume it mostly has to do
> with our education system, and the general leg-up from our
> wealth compared to the less developed nations like India.
> Japan tried and failed in the 1980s, perhaps due to cultural
> differences. Now India is becoming serious competition.

I've always wondered why most software is written in the USA. It
can't be the education, when I compare what typical BScs do for
math or CS in the US and in Europe. Maybe there is more customer
orientation and work attitude than in Europe (because there you
expect to get everything for free from the government, yuck!).

It's no surprise to me that now the US software landscape moves to
other countries.

> I don't know exactly what we ought to do differently to continue
> to dominate this market, but desperately hoping that the folks
> in India won't improve their capabilities isn't the answer.

We can tell people to buy "home-made" software in preference, or
try to build better software than the Indians. OTOH, they so much
outnumber us that that might be a losing proposition.

--
No man is good enough to govern another man without that other's
consent. -- Abraham Lincoln

david....@gmail.com

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Apr 18, 2005, 5:50:35 PM4/18/05
to

> We can tell people to buy "home-made" software in preference, or
> try to build better software than the Indians. OTOH, they so much
> outnumber us that that might be a losing proposition.


Where is the boundary? Is software written by Ukrainians more or less
home-made than
one written by Indians?

Of the currently available Common Lisp implementations, are
those maintained by people of Russian, German or any other origin
better or worse than
those written in the USA by offsprings of pilgrims?

How do you distinguish great high quality software written in the USA
by the real programmers
from Indian/Russian/Romanian crap?

When an american programmer gets unemployed and replaced by a guy from
Hungary, is it because the hungarian guy is dumb and therefore cheap?
Or is it because the Hungarian guy is smarter, and it does not make
sense to pay even the same money to the american programmer just
because he is american?

Can you point me at some masterpieces of American Software so that I
understand what to pay for?

David Tolpin

Brandon J. Van Every

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Apr 18, 2005, 6:03:28 PM4/18/05
to
rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) wrote
>> From: "Brandon J. Van Every"
>>
>> I can't fathom how you could acquire 15 years of practical Lisp
>> experience and presently be willing to work for $5/hour in the USA.
>
> I'd like to work for more, but no paying work whatsoever is available
> during this recession,

You are lying, particularly to yourself. The truth is, you're making
choices about what you will / won't do to hustle yourself, and what
languages you will / won't work with. I make those choices too. I'm
just honest with myself about them.

If you wanna get paid to do Lisp, you're gonna have to make the right
moves. "I'll work for peanuts!" is the wrong move. Nobody will take
you seriously. The right move is more like putting some compelling Lisp
app on your website, and networking with a whole bunch of people who
actually have Lisp jobs. You're probably also going to have to move to
wherever the job is, as there's no concentration of jobs anywhere in the
country for any of the 'fancy' languages.

>> It seems like your argument is either completely disingenuous, or
>> else, well, nobody in their right mind would hire you.
>
> You have a fucking stupid attitude.

No, frankly you do. Anyone with your intelligence and experience who's
offering himself for minimum wage is fucking stupid, in a certain
respect. Put another way, your weakness is in business schmoozing. You
seem very clueless about how one would go about advertizing oneself to
get a Lisp job.

You also seem to be missing some basic business math. I don't know how
you are supporting yourself currently, if you think it is possible to
live in California on minimum wage. Let alone make enough money to
mitigate the risks of running a business.

Again, misc.business.consulting for starter materials. Also, go to the
public library. They have lots of free books on what to do.

> I'm telling the truth. I have 15
> years experience programming in Lisp (and 7 years experience in other
> programming languages). I'm very good at programming. Anyone who would
> hire me to do the kind of work I am good at doing would get a true
> bargain, good work at low cost. Somebody hiring me would be very much
> in "right mind". It's the people like you, who conclude since I got
> laid off during a recession and am still unemployed that I must be
> worthless, who are not in their right mind.

You're crying to the wrong guy about the recession. Circumstances suck,
but it's your responsibility to decide how you're going to market
yourself and get others to pay you.

>> $12/hour scrubbing floors
>> $15/hour painting apartments
>> $17/hour on heavy yard work
>
> I have a flattened spinal disk, so I probably couldn't do such work on
> any regular basis, like more than an hour a day for the first two, or
> ten minutes for the last. A few years ago when I was moving to a new
> apartment, all by myself, no help from anyone, at the end I accidently
> twisted my back and for the next three days I was unable to get out of
> bed except by spending a full hour maneuvering over to hands and knees
> whereupon I could finally crawl but not stand up.

Are you on permanent disability? As bad as a disability might
be, I think having a legitimate excuse to receive permanent funding from
the government would be an enviable position as a software developer.
You could build some killer app on disability money and spring it on the
world when you're good and ready to. Sure beats minimum wage.

>> $8/hour registering voters


>> $20/hour gathering signatures when it's going well.
>
> Definitely "sales" job, harassing people to spend their time for no
> benefit to them.

I get tired of people with that kind of attitude. Signature gatherers
allow the common person to participate in the political process
directly. This *is* of benefit to those who sign, and also to those who
at least evaluate the initiatives whether they sign them or not. Every
once in awhile I meet some stick-in-the-mud who thinks their elected
officials are infallible and that ordinary citizens shouldn't be a
direct part of the political process. I think such people are morons.
My own view of politicians is they aren't inherently better than lots of
other people out there. They are simply better at cutting deals and
getting their way.

> Is there any money for gathering signatures for a
> petition to outlaw hiring overseas workers for less than the legal
> minimum wage in the USA? I think I could "get into that".

*Forming* petitions is a different ballgame than getting people to
*sign* petitions. Signature gatherers are low on the political food
chain. We're all mercenaries. We're all there to make money, and we
have varying degrees of idealism and mores. I'm 'somewhat idealistic'.
There are measures I won't carry. Others don't care what they carry.
They see people as a dollar sign and nothing more.

I don't know much about the art of *forming* a petition. That's a kind
of political lobbying. You'd need funding from some source to pay the
signature gatherers. The reality is, you can't get measures qualified
for the ballot with volunteers. Volunteers just don't have the stamina
to do all the hard work required to qualify a measure for the ballot.
Anyways if you want to *form* petitions, to some degree you're talking
about a career in politics. With all the dealmaking, huckstering, and
salesmanship that entails.

BR

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Apr 18, 2005, 6:13:38 PM4/18/05
to
On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 14:50:35 -0700, david....@gmail.com wrote:

> When an american programmer gets unemployed and replaced by a guy from
> Hungary, is it because the hungarian guy is dumb and therefore cheap? Or
> is it because the Hungarian guy is smarter, and it does not make sense
> to pay even the same money to the american programmer just because he is
> american?

It's not about brains, but about mobility. If people were as mobile as
their jobs? At least the playing field would be more equitable.

Ulrich Hobelmann

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Apr 18, 2005, 6:34:25 PM4/18/05
to
david....@gmail.com wrote:
>>We can tell people to buy "home-made" software in preference, or
>>try to build better software than the Indians. OTOH, they so much
>>outnumber us that that might be a losing proposition.
>
>
>
> Where is the boundary? Is software written by Ukrainians more or less
> home-made than
> one written by Indians?

Probably not. I'm just saying like some people buy American cars
instead of Japanese ones, you can buy $YOUR-COUNTRY's software in
preference (if it's any good).

> Of the currently available Common Lisp implementations, are
> those maintained by people of Russian, German or any other origin
> better or worse than
> those written in the USA by offsprings of pilgrims?

I think the commercial ones (Franz, Xanalys) are US-based. For
Free Software the matter doesn't arise. In theory it all destroys
jobs, as you don't pay anybody.

> How do you distinguish great high quality software written in the USA
> by the real programmers
> from Indian/Russian/Romanian crap?

How do you distinguish crap from quality? Hm, dunno, I just do ;)

> When an american programmer gets unemployed and replaced by a guy from
> Hungary, is it because the hungarian guy is dumb and therefore cheap?
> Or is it because the Hungarian guy is smarter, and it does not make
> sense to pay even the same money to the american programmer just
> because he is american?

Maybe it's because things are cheaper in Hungary and therefore the
Hungarian guy can live on less money. Maybe it's because less
people import things from Hungary (that is changing), so their
currency might be cheap (does Hungary have the Euro? I'm SO
uninformed!).

It might not make sense to pay the US guy more money, no. In a
worldwide economy you might even consider that discriminating
against foreigners ;)

But I think there's nothing wrong with supporting local brands and
companies (and it reduces transportation of material goods all
over the globe).

> Can you point me at some masterpieces of American Software so that I
> understand what to pay for?

Buy whatever you like. The software I paid for is Mac OS X, and,
um, I think that's it so far. I think it's worth the money.
Well, in the past I bought a couple of games, too. These days I
mostly buy CDs (some), books (rarely) or just save my money for
other things like travel.

Note: I'm a proponent of global free trade, so I don't really care
where anything comes from as long as it's good, cheap, and created
without badly exploiting people and violating human rights.

Edi Weitz

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Apr 18, 2005, 7:16:41 PM4/18/05
to
On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 17:34:25 -0500, Ulrich Hobelmann <u.hob...@web.de> wrote:

> david....@gmail.com wrote:
>
>> Of the currently available Common Lisp implementations, are those
>> maintained by people of Russian, German or any other origin better
>> or worse than those written in the USA by offsprings of pilgrims?
>
> I think the commercial ones (Franz, Xanalys) are US-based.

You think that but it's not true. (Hint: Replace "Xanalys" with
"LispWorks", that's how they're called now, and check their website.)

Edi.

--

Lisp is not dead, it just smells funny.

Real email: (replace (subseq "spam...@agharta.de" 5) "edi")

Brandon J. Van Every

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Apr 18, 2005, 9:46:40 PM4/18/05
to
Ulrich Hobelmann <u.hob...@web.de> wrote in news:3ciqvhF6o44mmU1

>
> Maybe it's because things are cheaper in Hungary and therefore the
> Hungarian guy can live on less money. Maybe it's because less
> people import things from Hungary (that is changing), so their
> currency might be cheap (does Hungary have the Euro? I'm SO
> uninformed!).
>
> It might not make sense to pay the US guy more money, no. In a
> worldwide economy you might even consider that discriminating
> against foreigners ;)

One factor you should take into consideration: various countries, such
as China, don't have laws about workplace safety or worker treatment
that the USA does. In many cases, the foreign worker is cheaper not
just because of economic disparity, but because it's more acceptable in
that country for workers to be exploited. It's very difficult to
compete on such an uneven playing field. Corporations, as you may be
aware, rarely have a conscience. This is at the heart of WTO protests
and the like. There's always this tension as to whether industrialized
nations have developed standards that are more safe / more equitable to
its citizens, vs. poor countries that don't give a shit, are behind
economically, and just want to catch up as fast as possible, damn the
cost to people.

There is of course the reverse argument of how much safety and
regulation is of benefit to a society, vs. how much is needless red tape
by some overbearing rulesmonger. These competing value systems
ultimately have to just fight it out.

> Note: I'm a proponent of global free trade, so I don't really care
> where anything comes from as long as it's good, cheap, and created
> without badly exploiting people and violating human rights.

That last clause is a huge caveat.

Ulrich Hobelmann

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Apr 18, 2005, 11:09:01 PM4/18/05
to
Brandon J. Van Every wrote:
> One factor you should take into consideration: various countries, such
> as China, don't have laws about workplace safety or worker treatment
> that the USA does. In many cases, the foreign worker is cheaper not
> just because of economic disparity, but because it's more acceptable in
> that country for workers to be exploited. It's very difficult to
> compete on such an uneven playing field. Corporations, as you may be
> aware, rarely have a conscience. This is at the heart of WTO protests
> and the like. There's always this tension as to whether industrialized
> nations have developed standards that are more safe / more equitable to
> its citizens, vs. poor countries that don't give a shit, are behind
> economically, and just want to catch up as fast as possible, damn the
> cost to people.

Yes, but the consumer has all power not to buy from that company.
Infortunately most people don't give a s**t about that. I buy
"normal" clothes, too, just because I'm not really aware of good
alternatives. I try to buy fairly traded coffee and chocolate,
though.

> There is of course the reverse argument of how much safety and
> regulation is of benefit to a society, vs. how much is needless red tape
> by some overbearing rulesmonger. These competing value systems
> ultimately have to just fight it out.

As long as there is no worldwide enforcement of human rights (and
thoses countries also don't care), only the consumer can kick some
ass by complaining and not buying.

>>Note: I'm a proponent of global free trade, so I don't really care
>>where anything comes from as long as it's good, cheap, and created
>>without badly exploiting people and violating human rights.
>
>
> That last clause is a huge caveat.

True. But restricting the freedom of trade doesn't improve any of
this, either.

Thomas F. Burdick

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Apr 19, 2005, 2:56:29 AM4/19/05
to
rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) writes:

> I'm desperately hoping some company in the USA will realize that the
> overhead in dealing with people who no spekka ingish widout badd aksent
> and live so far away it takes an international long distance phone call
> to talk to them live (as if that did any good with their accent), and
> whose documentation is illegible due to lack of English skills, is just
> not worth dealing with just to shave a couple dollars off the
> already-low minimum wage here in the USA.

It wasn't charming when you were just a whining loser, but this
newfound or newly expressed racism and xenophobia of yours is really
disgusting. Go crawl back into your South Bay hole.

david....@gmail.com

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 3:36:45 AM4/19/05
to
> > Where is the boundary? Is software written by Ukrainians more or
less
> > home-made than
> > one written by Indians?
>
> Probably not. I'm just saying like some people buy American cars
> instead of Japanese ones, you can buy $YOUR-COUNTRY's software in
> preference (if it's any good).
>

I had written or participated in writing several pieces of American
software, some of which you may well be using right now. I grew up in
Moscow, and live in Yerevan, Armenia now. Many of my friends
are behind 'american software', both good and bad; most programs are
written in America mostly because America is more tolerant to engineers
from all over the world, and welcomes innovation.

Things may change with the current movement against outsourcing; but it
will just mean that 'most software' will be written in a part of the
world which provides shelter to talented people no matter what country
they come from. And America will have to resort to using low-quality
domestic software much in the same way a part of americans uses
low-quality domesitc cars.

> > Of the currently available Common Lisp implementations, are
> > those maintained by people of Russian, German or any other origin
> > better or worse than
> > those written in the USA by offsprings of pilgrims?
>
> I think the commercial ones (Franz, Xanalys) are US-based. For
> Free Software the matter doesn't arise. In theory it all destroys
> jobs, as you don't pay anybody.

Franz is in California, right. Xanalysis (and LispWorks) are in the UK.

> Maybe it's because things are cheaper in Hungary and therefore the
> Hungarian guy can live on less money. Maybe it's because less
> people import things from Hungary (that is changing), so their
> currency might be cheap (does Hungary have the Euro? I'm SO
> uninformed!).
>

Yes, Hungary has Euro; and no, the hungarian guy does not charge less.
He just works better.

> Buy whatever you like. The software I paid for is Mac OS X, and,
> um, I think that's it so far. I think it's worth the money.
> Well, in the past I bought a couple of games, too. These days I
> mostly buy CDs (some), books (rarely) or just save my money for
> other things like travel.
>

I know of at least a half dozen significant components of Mac OS X
which are written by Russians,
Germans (and other non-americans). The Apple boxes are made in China.
There is not so much 'american code' in there, really.

Bulent Murtezaoglu

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 3:44:01 AM4/19/05
to
>>>>> "CCS" == Christopher C Stacy <cst...@news.dtpq.com> writes:
[...]
CCS> I haven't thought about why it is that te USA has enjoyed
CCS> such a lead in the software market. I assume it mostly has
CCS> to do with our education system, and the general leg-up from
CCS> our wealth compared to the less developed nations like India.
[...]

I am no big fan of Tom Friedman but there's some truth to what he says:

http://www.indianembassy.org/US_Media/2004/mar/The%20Secret%20of%20Our%20Sauce.htm

I quote:

[on hi-tech companies in India]
"They thrive by defying their political-economic environment, not by
emerging from it."

In my limited experience of working both in the US and Turkey (between
the US and India as far as standard of living goes) I can confirm
this.

cheers,

BM

Alex Mizrahi

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 4:57:17 AM4/19/05
to
(message (Hello 'Robert)
(you :wrote :on '(Sun, 17 Apr 2005 14:45:12 -0700))
(

??>> i don't have much experience with Common Lisp

RMs> It sounds like you have less than one year Common Lisp experience,
RMs> is that a correct assessent? Accordingly:
RMs> Would you be willing to work for less than one dollar per hour,
RMs> in rough proportion to your lesser amount of experience than I have?

no, because at any time i can work as C++ or PHP programmer at least for
1.5-2$ per hour. :)

RMs> Do you have experience writing WebServer applictions using Common
RMs> Lisp? I do. I have an online demo I made when I first started CGI/CL
RMs> programming near the 2000/2001 boundary.
RMs> http://shell.rawbw.com/~rem/cgi-bin/topscript.cgi
RMs> Do you have a demo of your CGI/CL programming to compare to mine?

:)
i see no benefits of using CGI with CL..

i've nearly production-quality web-site for my university with CL (based on
mod_lisp) -- but unfortunately other developers didn't like Lisp, so it was
replaced with PHP one.
also i've done small game working via HTTP that is intended to be used from
mobile phones,
and now i'm doing educational program for my diplom work doing
web-programming in Common Lisp..

)
(With-best-regards '(Alex Mizrahi) :aka 'killer_storm)
"People who lust for the Feel of keys on their fingertips (c) Inity")


Brandon J. Van Every

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 5:35:23 AM4/19/05
to
Thomas F. Burdick wrote:

Why is his sentiment racist or xenophobic? Offensive about some
people's language skills, yes, but it also contains the grain of truth.

--
Cheers, www.indiegamedesign.com
Brandon Van Every Seattle, WA

20% of the world is real.
80% is gobbledygook we make up inside our own heads.

Brandon J. Van Every

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 5:37:26 AM4/19/05
to
david....@gmail.com wrote:

>
>And America will have to resort to using low-quality
>domestic software much in the same way a part of americans uses
>low-quality domesitc cars.
>
>

Heh! My ass. See you in the future.

--
Cheers, www.indiegamedesign.com
Brandon Van Every Seattle, WA

"We live in a world of very bright people building
crappy software with total shit for tools and process."
- Ed McKenzie

Matthias Buelow

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 6:45:21 AM4/19/05
to
"david....@gmail.com" <david....@gmail.com> writes:

>Yes, Hungary has Euro; and no, the hungarian guy does not charge less.

No, not yet:

http://www.ecb.int/bc/intro/html/map.en.html

According to http://www.ecb.int/ecb/enlargement/html/index.en.html:

"The new countries will adopt the euro only when they fulfil certain
economic criteria, namely, a high degree of price stability, a sound
fiscal situation, stable exchange rates and converged long-term
interest rates."

And of course, if they want to. Not all "old" EU member states have
adopted it (yet).

mkb.

Pascal Bourguignon

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 8:14:38 AM4/19/05
to
"Brandon J. Van Every" <mylastname...@mycompanyname.com> writes:

> Thomas F. Burdick wrote:
>
> >rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) writes:
> >
> >
> >>I'm desperately hoping some company in the USA will realize that the
> >>overhead in dealing with people who no spekka ingish widout badd aksent
> >>and live so far away it takes an international long distance phone call
> >>to talk to them live (as if that did any good with their accent), and
> >>whose documentation is illegible due to lack of English skills, is just
> >>not worth dealing with just to shave a couple dollars off the
> >>already-low minimum wage here in the USA.
> >>
> >
> >It wasn't charming when you were just a whining loser, but this
> >newfound or newly expressed racism and xenophobia of yours is really
> >disgusting. Go crawl back into your South Bay hole.
> >
> Why is his sentiment racist or xenophobic? Offensive about some
> people's language skills, yes, but it also contains the grain of truth.

English is the main language of India. There's no reason to believe
an Indian would be less skilled at English than a North American.
Often North Americans are less understandable than other (of British
influence) English speakers...


http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/in.html

English enjoys associate status but is the most important language
for national, political, and commercial communication; Hindi is
the national language and primary tongue of 30% of the people;
there are 14 other official languages: Bengali, Telugu, Marathi,
Tamil, Urdu, Gujarati, Malayalam, Kannada, Oriya, Punjabi,
Assamese, Kashmiri, Sindhi, and Sanskrit; Hindustani is a popular
variant of Hindi/Urdu spoken widely throughout northern India but
is not an official language.


--
__Pascal Bourguignon__ http://www.informatimago.com/

In a World without Walls and Fences,
who needs Windows and Gates?

Pascal Bourguignon

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 8:35:37 AM4/19/05
to
"david....@gmail.com" <david....@gmail.com> writes:
> I know of at least a half dozen significant components of Mac OS X
> which are written by Russians,
> Germans (and other non-americans). The Apple boxes are made in China.
> There is not so much 'american code' in there, really.

MacOSX (NeXTSTEP) would not exist without French people such as
Jean-Marie Hulot (Interface Builder).

--
__Pascal Bourguignon__ http://www.informatimago.com/

You never feed me.
Perhaps I'll sleep on your face.
That will sure show you.

Paul F. Dietz

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 8:40:18 AM4/19/05
to
Christopher C. Stacy wrote:

> I haven't thought about why it is that te USA has enjoyed such
> a lead in the software market. I assume it mostly has to do
> with our education system, and the general leg-up from our
> wealth compared to the less developed nations like India.
> Japan tried and failed in the 1980s, perhaps due to cultural
> differences. Now India is becoming serious competition.

One barrier in the past was the cost of hardware. It didn't
make much sense to try to save on labor costs if it meant
your (say) million dollar systems weren't being used effectively.

Nowadays the hardware is dirt cheap, of course.

There's also a lot to be said for putting developers close
to customers. Cheaper international telecom helps there,
but it's not yet a panacea. This argument suggests that
the lead in software development is due to the presence
of customers here rather than there. A low wage economy
has less incentive to automate, and so would have fewer
customers.

Paul

israel

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 8:59:42 AM4/19/05
to
rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) writes:

> I live in California and would be willing to work for the legal minimum
> wage, something like $5 something/hour.

That translates to around 200 Indian Rupees / hour
ie: 32,000 Rupees / month for a 40 hour week.

Indians ( and perhaps ukrainians ) would undercut that by a factor of 3
and still make a profit.

israel

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 9:02:26 AM4/19/05
to
rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) writes:

> I'm desperately hoping some company in the USA will realize that the
> overhead in dealing with people who no spekka ingish widout badd aksent

...


> somebody could hire me to re-do all the broken-English documentation
> produced by the Indians who wrote the software

I think that I begin to understand why you are not getting hired.
You have a serious attitude problem.


israel

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 9:09:41 AM4/19/05
to
Edi Weitz <spam...@agharta.de> writes:

> You think that but it's not true. (Hint: Replace "Xanalys" with
> "LispWorks", that's how they're called now, and check their website.)

Office Address

LispWorks Ltd.
St John's Innovation Centre
Cowley Road
Cambridge
CB4 0WS
England

israel

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 9:12:52 AM4/19/05
to
"Brandon J. Van Every" <mylastname...@mycompanyname.com> writes:

> One factor you should take into consideration: various countries, such
> as China, don't have laws about workplace safety or worker treatment
> that the USA does.

So ?
The US does not have laws on paternity leave or non-discrimination against gays
that many other countries do.

Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 11:20:31 AM4/19/05
to
> From: "david....@gmail.com" <david....@gmail.com>

> When an american programmer gets unemployed and replaced by a guy
> from Hungary, is it because the hungarian guy is dumb and therefore
> cheap?

No, it's because the Hungarian guy is not bound by the Federal minimum
wage, so he can undercut the wage of any American guy. The Hungarian
guy probably doesn't have 22 years experience programming computers, as
the American guy does, but it's the difference in legal minimum wage,
not the skill difference, that causes American companies to outsource
for their software needs.

By the way, does anybody know what the typical hourly wage is for
writing computer software, for workers in India and Hungary, when
outsourced by American companies? I need to know so that I can petition
for a lowering of the legal minimum wage here so that I could legally
compete with them. For example, could I incorporate myself in India,
have all income go to that corporation, then I get dividends back from
my corporation, and there's no law requring dividends to exceed a
minimum wage?

Alternately, is there any way I could work legally in another country,
not subject to USA minimum wage law, while I'm still physically in the
USA? Sort of like an offshore shelter for employment, just like
companies have offshore shelters for all their financial stuff to avoid
having to pay corporate income tax?

> Or is it because the Hungarian guy is smarter, and it does not make
> sense to pay even the same money to the american programmer just
> because he is american?

It's definitely not that. I'm as smart as any Hungarian guy.

david....@gmail.com

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 11:57:11 AM4/19/05
to

, but it's the difference in legal minimum wage,
> not the skill difference, that causes American companies to outsource
> for their software needs.

Don't even hope for that. I routinely get contractor's job for much
more than you were
going to work for. And I get my job at least partly because I work
better and more skilled.


> By the way, does anybody know what the typical hourly wage is for
> writing computer software, for workers in India and Hungary, when
> outsourced by American companies? I need to know so that I can
petition
> for a lowering of the legal minimum wage here so that I could legally
> compete with them.

You are welcome to compete. The hourly rate varies from $5 for third
year university students
to $25 for experienced coders and more. The money is paid for better
skills, not for lower rates.
With additional risks and expenses, the difference is not that high.

F> Alternately, is there any way I could work legally in another


country,
> not subject to USA minimum wage law, while I'm still physically in
the
> USA?

Is it prohibited by the US laws?

David Tolpin

Paolo Amoroso

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 12:05:36 PM4/19/05
to
rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) writes:

> Alternately, is there any way I could work legally in another country,
> not subject to USA minimum wage law, while I'm still physically in the
> USA? Sort of like an offshore shelter for employment, just like

Consultant Mark Watson, who also happens to be a Lisper, is a case of
"reverse outsourcing":

http://www.markwatson.com

Some time ago he told in his blog about a job he was
then--still?--doing for an Indian company. He was physically in the
USA, but I don't know about your other requirements.


Paolo
--
Why Lisp? http://lisp.tech.coop/RtL%20Highlight%20Film
Recommended Common Lisp libraries/tools (see also http://clrfi.alu.org):
- ASDF/ASDF-INSTALL: system building/installation
- CL-PPCRE: regular expressions
- UFFI: Foreign Function Interface

Brandon J. Van Every

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 12:30:34 PM4/19/05
to
israel wrote:

The goodness of a given country's laws is a sliding scale. Judge
accordingly. I can't remember what states, if any, have laws against
discrimination by sexual orientation, although I'm inclined to guess
Califorina does and I can't remember about Washington. Many companies
in the USA have explicit policies of not discriminating against gays,
although of course lacking a law, taking legal action on such matters
would be more difficult. Not impossible though: when companies have a
uniform policy, one can indeed sue for being treated differently than
one's peers.

Svenne Krap

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 12:46:39 PM4/19/05
to
Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t wrote:

> By the way, does anybody know what the typical hourly wage is for
> writing computer software, for workers in India and Hungary, when
> outsourced by American companies? I need to know so that I can petition
> for a lowering of the legal minimum wage here so that I could legally
> compete with them. For example, could I incorporate myself in India,
> have all income go to that corporation, then I get dividends back from
> my corporation, and there's no law requring dividends to exceed a
> minimum wage?

I think you are on the wrong track. Have you considered that there is
quite a big difference between living expenses in the US and
India/Hungary (well, I am a native of neither, but anyways).

I don't know what your living expenses are in the US, but here you can
barely live for say 1200$ a month after taxes as a single person (I
figure it is not that different in the US). So even if I was tax free
(which I am not in this heavily taxed country), I would still have to
make 60 hours a week to barely make it.

In comparison over half a billion chinese (and I figure that goes for
Indians as well) live for less than 1$ a day (granted that are farmers
with no electricity and so on and not highly skilled professionals).

By the way, I go for around 100$ an hour (as an indepedant consultant,
not employee), so I think you 5$ an hour sound like you have no
confindence in your own skills.

I would not take a paid job for less that say 40-45.000 dollars/year
before taxes (as I am danish there is not such things as
medical/dental/whatever benefits paied by an employer - the only
exception is pension payment).

Brandon J. Van Every

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 12:49:40 PM4/19/05
to
Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t wrote

>By the way, does anybody know what the typical hourly wage is for


>writing computer software, for workers in India and Hungary, when
>outsourced by American companies?
>

Worth knowing...

>I need to know so that I can petition
>for a lowering of the legal minimum wage here so that I could legally
>compete with them.
>

...but not for the reason you state. I hope you're not serious here.
If you are, then you need to seek psychiatric help. The effort
necessary to get a Lisp job is far, far, far less than the effort needed
to enact an unpopular political idea. Thus this sounds like you're
living in a delusional world where you avoid your employment problems.

> For example, could I incorporate myself in India,
>have all income go to that corporation, then I get dividends back from
>my corporation, and there's no law requring dividends to exceed a
>minimum wage?
>
>

*What* dividends? You aren't going to make any money!

>Alternately, is there any way I could work legally in another country,
>not subject to USA minimum wage law, while I'm still physically in the
>USA? Sort of like an offshore shelter for employment, just like
>companies have offshore shelters for all their financial stuff to avoid
>having to pay corporate income tax?
>
>
>

IIRC the loophole typically exploited is the L1 Visa for
"intra-corporate transfers." This allows a foreigner to come to US
shores and get paid the same peanuts he'd get paid back home.
Unscrupulous companies make a business of fronting these guys overseas.
There's been much political teeth gnashing about closing the loophole in
recent years, but I don't know that it has happened.

I believe you'd have to become a foreigner to take advantage of such a
thing. Also there is probably a time expiry on the L1 Visa, so in
becoming a foreigner, you're not going to be able to stay in the USA for
very long. It seems the only rational course of action if you're bound
and determined to lower your wages is for you to emmigrate to somewhere
like Hungary. Try to convince them that they want you as a citizen. I
don't know how eager the poor countries are to accept new citizens with
skills. Maybe very eager for all I know. In the USA I believe it takes
5 years to become a citizen. I mentioned before that you'd probably
have to be willing to move to solve your problems, to go to where the
job is. This is a variation on the theme, and hardly a lucrative variation.

>
>It's definitely not that. I'm as smart as any Hungarian guy.
>
>

You certainly aren't with regards to business. Are you at least smart
enough to realize what you don't know, and go seek out better answers to
make you a more effective businessman? Again, misc.business.consulting
for starters.

--
Cheers, www.indiegamedesign.com
Brandon Van Every Seattle, WA

20% of the world is real.

Brandon J. Van Every

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 12:54:03 PM4/19/05
to
Pascal Bourguignon wrote:

>English is the main language of India.
>

I thought it was Hindi.

>There's no reason to believe
>an Indian would be less skilled at English than a North American.
>
>

Are you saying this as a matter of theory, or a matter of personal
experience in India?

Brandon J. Van Every

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 12:57:54 PM4/19/05
to
israel wrote:

Yes he does, but it is not because he's ragging on the English skills of
foreigners. It's because he invents elaborate scenarios about how the
foreigners prevent him from getting a Lisp job. What's really
preventing him is his utter unwillingness to do a proper job search, to
do the right things, and say the right things to the right people.

--
Cheers, www.indiegamedesign.com
Brandon Van Every Seattle, WA

When no one else sells courage, supply and demand take hold.

Andras Simon

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 3:56:24 PM4/19/05
to
rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) writes:

> > From: "david....@gmail.com" <david....@gmail.com>
> > When an american programmer gets unemployed and replaced by a guy
> > from Hungary, is it because the hungarian guy is dumb and therefore
> > cheap?
>
> No, it's because the Hungarian guy is not bound by the Federal minimum
> wage, so he can undercut the wage of any American guy. The Hungarian

I doubt that you'll find many Hungarian programmers who are
willing to work for less then $5 (after tax)/hour.

> guy probably doesn't have 22 years experience programming computers, as

What makes you think so?

[...]



> It's definitely not that. I'm as smart as any Hungarian guy.

You can certainly make as bold statements as any Hungarian guy.

Andras

Edi Weitz

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 4:21:02 PM4/19/05
to
On Tue, 19 Apr 2005 08:20:31 -0700, rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) wrote:

> I'm as smart as any Hungarian guy.

As smart as, say, Paul Erdös? Or John von Neumann?

--

Lisp is not dead, it just smells funny.

Real email: (replace (subseq "spam...@agharta.de" 5) "edi")

Robert Swindells

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 6:19:55 PM4/19/05
to
On Tue, 19 Apr 2005 23:21:02 +0200, Edi Weitz wrote:

> On Tue, 19 Apr 2005 08:20:31 -0700, rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) wrote:
>
>> I'm as smart as any Hungarian guy.
>
> As smart as, say, Paul Erdös? Or John von Neumann?

Charles Simonyi has done ok for himself as well.

Hungarian hackers have been in demand for a long time.

israel

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 6:40:03 PM4/19/05
to
"Brandon J. Van Every" <mylastname...@mycompanyname.com> writes:

> It's because he invents elaborate scenarios about how
> the foreigners prevent him from getting a Lisp job. What's really
> preventing him is his utter unwillingness to do a proper job search,
> to do the right things, and say the right things to the right people.

His truly pathetic personal web site is unlikely to help either.

He lists writing "Hello World" programs in 2002 as a significant achievement.

Reading this and the long winded story on it about his credit card debt and
his impending eviction is unlikely to encourage any prospective employer.

israel

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 6:37:26 PM4/19/05
to
"Brandon J. Van Every" <mylastname...@mycompanyname.com> writes:

>> English is the main language of India.
> I thought it was Hindi.

My experience has been that educated Indians invariably speak English.

Only North Indians speak Hindi.

South Indians view Hindi the way the English view French.
Something they study in school, but not something they generally speak.

Ulrich Hobelmann

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 6:46:34 PM4/19/05
to
Paolo Amoroso wrote:
> rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) writes:
>
>
>>Alternately, is there any way I could work legally in another country,
>>not subject to USA minimum wage law, while I'm still physically in the
>>USA? Sort of like an offshore shelter for employment, just like
>
>
> Consultant Mark Watson, who also happens to be a Lisper, is a case of
> "reverse outsourcing":
>
> http://www.markwatson.com
>
> Some time ago he told in his blog about a job he was
> then--still?--doing for an Indian company. He was physically in the
> USA, but I don't know about your other requirements.

(Was it in WIRED?) I read that Americans export much more work
than they import/offshore work (factor 2, several billions?). So
if there would be laws against working for or other countries +
letting them work for you, the US would lose big time.

--
No man is good enough to govern another man without that other's
consent. -- Abraham Lincoln

Pascal Bourguignon

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 6:49:34 PM4/19/05
to
rem...@Yahoo.Com (Robert Maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t) writes:
> By the way, does anybody know what the typical hourly wage is for
> writing computer software, for workers in India and Hungary, when
> outsourced by American companies? I need to know so that I can petition
> for a lowering of the legal minimum wage here so that I could legally
> compete with them. For example, could I incorporate myself in India,
> have all income go to that corporation, then I get dividends back from
> my corporation, and there's no law requring dividends to exceed a
> minimum wage?

Why do you want to work by the hour?
Be free-lance and work with fixed price, so you can bid any price you want.

--
__Pascal Bourguignon__ http://www.informatimago.com/

Until real software engineering is developed, the next best practice
is to develop with a dynamic system that has extreme late binding in
all aspects. The first system to really do this in an important way
is Lisp. -- Alan Kay

Ulrich Hobelmann

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 6:56:20 PM4/19/05
to
Pascal Bourguignon wrote:
> English is the main language of India. There's no reason to believe
> an Indian would be less skilled at English than a North American.
> Often North Americans are less understandable than other (of British
> influence) English speakers...

Maybe they are skilled, but sometimes you can read that they
aren't native (even though as you say their are legally). I
(German) have really trouble understanding blacks and indians here
in the US, and I don't consider myself racist (except that I
dislike my own country :D). English people are hard sometimes
(when they use their very own slang words), but otherwise quite
clear, yes.

>
> http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/in.html
>
> English enjoys associate status but is the most important language
> for national, political, and commercial communication; Hindi is
> the national language and primary tongue of 30% of the people;
> there are 14 other official languages: Bengali, Telugu, Marathi,
> Tamil, Urdu, Gujarati, Malayalam, Kannada, Oriya, Punjabi,
> Assamese, Kashmiri, Sindhi, and Sanskrit; Hindustani is a popular
> variant of Hindi/Urdu spoken widely throughout northern India but
> is not an official language.

Well, in Germany about everybody learns 5-10 years of English.
Have you heard their accents though? Seriously, it's not pretty
(though I can understand most people; but I grew up with with that
accent). Maybe the Indians learn English from teachers with bad
accents too? ;)

Tayssir John Gabbour

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 7:01:18 PM4/19/05
to
Bulent Murtezaoglu wrote:
> >>>>> "CCS" == Christopher C Stacy <cst...@news.dtpq.com> writes:
> [...]
> CCS> I haven't thought about why it is that te USA has enjoyed
> CCS> such a lead in the software market. I assume it mostly has
> CCS> to do with our education system, and the general leg-up from
> CCS> our wealth compared to the less developed nations like
> CCS> India.
> [...]
>
> I am no big fan of Tom Friedman but there's some truth to what he
> says:
>
>
http://www.indianembassy.org/US_Media/2004/mar/The%20Secret%20of%20Our%20Sauce.htm

NYT points out how the US gov't had been feeding America's tech
industry. Through DARPA...
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/02/technology/02darpa.html?hp&ex=1112504400&en=8232d070f1a41760&ei=5094&partner=homepage

(In particular, their "Multimedia" sidebar, which has a couple cute
graphs showing a couple examples of this welfare.)

Incidentally, I agree that Tom Friedman is a suspicious guy, and am
reminded of Paul Graham's article...
http://paulgraham.com/submarine.html

Pascal Bourguignon

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 7:04:30 PM4/19/05
to
"Brandon J. Van Every" <mylastname...@mycompanyname.com> writes:

> Pascal Bourguignon wrote:
>
> > English is the main language of India.
> I thought it was Hindi.

Only spoken by 30% of the population, as indicated by the quote from
the CIA World Fact you justiciously elided.



> >There's no reason to believe
> >an Indian would be less skilled at English than a North American.
> >
> Are you saying this as a matter of theory, or a matter of personal
> experience in India?

You're right, if I must judge from the number of weapon of mass
destruction foundin Irak, the CIA must be completely wrong and 100% of
Indians must speak Hindi, and none can speak decent English.

--
__Pascal Bourguignon__ http://www.informatimago.com/

In deep sleep hear sound,
Cat vomit hairball somewhere.
Will find in morning.

Brandon J. Van Every

unread,
Apr 19, 2005, 7:19:57 PM4/19/05