Theory: the jump-bar

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Jorn Barger

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Feb 4, 2001, 12:47:09 PM2/4/01
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I just thought of this, so I don't know if it's practical... but:

One of the functions a bookmark/favorite can serve is to link a 'jump
page' that links several (or many) other useful pages.

To some extent this is just exploiting pure laziness-- the visitors
_could_ save that bookmark themselves, but it's easier to use the known
'jump'. So if you want people to check your page often, you can try to
serve as a jump for lots of these-- effectively a 'portal' with
(hopefully) some unifying theme.

But if you know this is a major reason people visit, then to be
considerate you probably ought to group those jump-links at the top of
the page where they'll display immediately, so people who just need to
jump won't have to wait for the rest of the page to render.

I've been doing something related with my weblog--
http://www.robotwisdom.com/

At a reader's request, since people often check back and find no new
items at the top, I added a row of other news sources that update
continually, so that as soon as they see I've got nothing new, they can
jump off to something else likely, without having to wait and scroll and
make other extra jumps.

--
http://www.robotwisdom.com/ "Relentlessly intelligent
yet playful, polymathic in scope of interests, minimalist
but user-friendly design." --Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

Jonathan Lundell

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Feb 5, 2001, 11:32:29 AM2/5/01
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In article <1eoaytg.19k9ipb13qhfbtN%jo...@mcs.com>, jo...@mcs.com (Jorn
Barger) wrote:

> One of the functions a bookmark/favorite can serve is to link a 'jump
> page' that links several (or many) other useful pages.

Sam Smith's http://prorev.com/fastnews.htm is an example of this kind of
thing gone terribly wrong. The useful and informative log is completely
swamped by links and a slow-loading headline service.

--
/Jonathan Lundell.
jlun...@resilience.com

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