What is this caled? (Opposite of ACD?) [Telecom]

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kasa...@gmail.com

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Aug 6, 2008, 9:35:26 AM8/6/08
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I am looking for hardware which will allow me to automatically switch
my outgoing line, hopefully managed over a LAN.

I have 20+ lines for outgoing calls. Based on the user logging into
the computer, I would need to switch their outgoing line.

I don't know what this is called. I was told "Automatic Call
Distributor", but based on my searches this seems like it has more to
do with routing incoming calls, when I want to route outgoing calls to
particular outgoing lines.

***** Moderator's Note *****

I presume you mean you want to select an outgoing line based on the
number being called, and in that case it's a fairly routine function
available from all the major PBX vendors.

However, if you want to select a line based on the _user_ who (whom? I
can never remember...) is _placing_ the call, no matter which number
that user is dialing, then I'm a bit confused: please tell us why and
what your goal is.

Bill Horne
Temporary Moderator

Please put [Telecom] at the end of your subject line, or I may never
see your post! Thanks!

We have a new address for email submissions: telecomdigestmoderator
atsign telecom-digest.org. This is only for those who submit posts via
email: if you use a newsreader or a web interface to contribute to the
digest, you don't need to change anything.

MC

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Aug 6, 2008, 10:15:49 AM8/6/08
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> However, if you want to select a line based on the _user_ who (whom? I
> can never remember...) is _placing_ the call, ...

The difference between "who" and "whom" is the same as the difference
between "he" and "him".

"He is placing the call" --> "the user who is placing the call"

"You called him" --> "the user whom you called"

Now you know. And no grammatical theory or terminology is required!

I'm a linguist; they pay me to think about things like this.

***** Moderator's Note *****

MC, they should pay you extra for today: yours is the most clear,
concise, and memorable advice I've ever received on this subject.

Of course, I can't promise I'll always remember to apply it, but I
_will_ always remember that you explained it well. ;-)

MC

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Aug 6, 2008, 7:47:06 PM8/6/08
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> The difference between "who" and "whom" is the same as the difference
> between "he" and "him".
> ***** Moderator's Note *****
> MC, they should pay you extra for today: yours is the most clear,
> concise, and memorable advice I've ever received on this subject.

Glad to be of service. Here's one more:

The difference between "its" and "it's" is the same as the difference
between "his" and "he's".

"He's puzzling." -> "It's puzzling."

"his strange attributes" -> "its strange attributes"

(Unlike nouns, possessive pronouns, such as "his," don't have an
apostrophe.)

If everybody would teach grammar this way, we'd have a much easier time.
Instead, it is traditional to teach English grammar by force-fitting it onto
Latin grammar -- which doesn't work very well; Latin has a very different
structure than English, and if you insist on describing English with Latin
rules and tools of thought, you get a lot of things wrong, such as the
mysterious rule against split infinitives.

Now back to telecom...

***** Moderator's Note *****

OMG! Latin? I didn't know that!

As the parent of a learning-disabled child, I've had to see way too
much of the dark underbelly of American education, and this explains a
lot - I don't remember any Latin, but the idea of basing instruction
in one language on the grammar of another is typical of the kind of
snafus I've seen.

Henry

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Aug 7, 2008, 1:57:55 AM8/7/08
to
MC <for.addr...@www.ai.uga.edu.slash.mc> wrote:

> The difference between "its" and "it's" is the same as the difference
> between "his" and "he's".
>
> "He's puzzling." -> "It's puzzling."
>
> "his strange attributes" -> "its strange attributes"
>
> (Unlike nouns, possessive pronouns, such as "his," don't have an
> apostrophe.)

Oops. In your example above, 'his strange attributes', "his" is of
course a possessive _adjective_, not a possessive pronoun.

'the red BMW is _his_ car' -> adjective, _describing_ 'car'

'the blue Audi is _his_' -> pronoun, _replacing_ '(Bill's) car'

This can be confusing because in the third person singular (masculine)
the same form, "his", is used in both instances. With the feminine at
least there is the difference between 'her' (adjective) and 'hers'
(pronoun) and with first person singular the distinction is perfectly
clear:

'my' -> 'mine'.

Let's not even get started with its / it's :-) -- what a can of
worms that is! Just the other day I actually saw someone use its' (can
you imagine?!?).

Oh, and by the way ... going back to

> (Unlike nouns, possessive pronouns, such as "his," don't have an
> apostrophe.)

we get your point. But consider this conversation heard daily down the
pub:

Mike: 'Oh, hallo lads! What'll ye have?'

Bill: 'I'll have a Guinness, please'.

Henry: 'Thanks, mate! Mine's a lager'.

'Mine' is most definitely a possessive pronoun and that is indubitably
an apostrophe crept in, there. So, appearances can be deceiving!

cheers,

Henry

Fred Atkinson

unread,
Aug 7, 2008, 11:12:09 AM8/7/08
to
On Wed, 6 Aug 2008 09:35:26 -0400 (EDT), "kasa...@gmail.com"
<kasa...@gmail.com> wrote:

>I am looking for hardware which will allow me to automatically switch
>my outgoing line, hopefully managed over a LAN.
>
>I have 20+ lines for outgoing calls. Based on the user logging into
>the computer, I would need to switch their outgoing line.
>
>I don't know what this is called. I was told "Automatic Call
>Distributor", but based on my searches this seems like it has more to
>do with routing incoming calls, when I want to route outgoing calls to
>particular outgoing lines.

There are a number of PBX systems out there that did that when
I was working for MCI. We installed WATS lines of varying bands 1
through 5. It was the PBX that had to select which one to use. For
example, if you placed a call over a band 1 (and the number was
reachable on band 1), the cost was less to process the call than if
they sent it over a WATs line with a higher band.

Without being familar with your hardware and your method of
doing business, it would be difficult for anyone on here to tell you
how to solve it. Perhaps you should tell a litte more about the
specifics of your system and what you are doing. Then perhaps someone
on here could make a suggestion.

Fred

kasa...@gmail.com

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Aug 7, 2008, 11:22:11 AM8/7/08
to
On Aug 6, 9:35 am, "kasaub...@gmail.com" <kasaub...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I am looking for hardware which will allow me to automatically switch
> my outgoing line, hopefully managed over a LAN.
>
> I have 20+ lines for outgoing calls. Based on the user logging into
> the computer, I would need to switch their outgoing line.
>
> I don't know what this is called. I was told "Automatic Call
> Distributor", but based on my searches this seems like it has more to
> do with routing incoming calls, when I want to route outgoing calls to
> particular outgoing lines.
>
> ***** Moderator's Note *****
>
> I presume you mean you want to select an outgoing line based on the
> number being called, and in that case it's a fairly routine function
> available from all the major PBX vendors.
>
> However, if you want to select a line based on the _user_ who (whom? I
> can never remember...) is _placing_ the call, no matter which number
> that user is dialing, then I'm a bit confused: please tell us why and
> what your goal is.

No, I want a different line to be selected based on the user who logs
into the station.

e.g. UserA logs into Station 1, the voice jack on the wall is routed
to 999-999-0001
UserB logs into Station 1, the voice jack on the wall is routed
to 999-999-0002

Right now what I have is my voice jacks wired to a rack mounted set of
rj 45 ports, and the lines coming in to another rack mounted set of rj
45 ports, and i make the connection between the voice jack and
outgoing phone line with a cat 5 patch cable.

What I'm looking for is hardware that would allow me to manage this
over a LAN. Sending commands to tell it to route the voice jack for
station1 to 999-999-0001, or switch it to 999-999-0002.

If i knew the terminology for any of these things I probably wouldn't
need to ask the questions.

***** Moderator's Note *****

So, you want to measure the productivity of individual employees by
inspecting the call records for "their" telephone line, and you want
"their" line to follow them no matter what seat they sit in on a
particular day.

This is a classic case for Computer-Telephone-Integration (CTI)
technology. Systems already exist that will either marry an individual
computer login to a specific employee identifier in the outgoing phone
logs, or require employees to "log in" to their telephone system when
they sit down. You don't need to invent anything new: I invite the
various vendors who read this list to post a (short!) summary of their
systems' capabilities.

MC

unread,
Aug 7, 2008, 11:23:15 AM8/7/08
to
> OMG! Latin? I didn't know that!
>
> As the parent of a learning-disabled child, I've had to see way too
> much of the dark underbelly of American education, and this explains a
> lot - I don't remember any Latin, but the idea of basing instruction
> in one language on the grammar of another is typical of the kind of
> snafus I've seen.

Don't blame the Americans. It is the mainstream of the way grammar has been
taught in Europe and its colonies since the 1500s -- since national
languages began to replace Latin for serious written communication. At the
end of the Middle Ages, it was widely felt that Latin was a "real" language
and the regional languages of Europe (English, French, etc.) were not.

But English grammar can be done well; it's just that a lot of the teaching
is done by people who don't understand it deeply enough. See:
http://www.ai.uga.edu/mc/BadGrammar.pdf

This is why all schoolteachers should take linguistics courses.

MC

unread,
Aug 7, 2008, 11:28:05 AM8/7/08
to
"Henry" <henr...@eircom.net> wrote in message
news:1ilahmb.5n4a0yxs452dN%henr...@eircom.net...

> MC <for.addr...@www.ai.uga.edu.slash.mc> wrote:
>
>> The difference between "its" and "it's" is the same as the difference
>> between "his" and "he's".
>>
>> "He's puzzling." -> "It's puzzling."
>>
>> "his strange attributes" -> "its strange attributes"
>>
>> (Unlike nouns, possessive pronouns, such as "his," don't have an
>> apostrophe.)
>
> Oops. In your example above, 'his strange attributes', "his" is of
> course a possessive _adjective_, not a possessive pronoun.

Right. It is syntactically an adjective but is formed from a pronoun and
serves as the possessive of a pronoun.

...

> Henry: 'Thanks, mate! Mine's a lager'.
>
> 'Mine' is most definitely a possessive pronoun and that is indubitably
> an apostrophe crept in, there. So, appearances can be deceiving!

But "'s" stands for "is" there. It is not a possessive marker.

Surely there is a linguistics newsgroup somewhere...

***** Moderator's Note *****

I'm sure there are several linguistics groups, but it's too much fun
watching who trumps whom.

Better watch out: I'll cc: my sister, and she can split an infinitive
until the participle grins ...

MC

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Aug 7, 2008, 4:02:28 PM8/7/08
to
> But "'s" stands for "is" there. It is not a possessive marker.
>
> Surely there is a linguistics newsgroup somewhere...
>
> ***** Moderator's Note *****
>
> I'm sure there are several linguistics groups, but it's too much fun
> watching who trumps whom.

I don't think it's entirely fair for me to compete. I'm a professional
(Ph.D. in linguistics, specializing in grammatical theory, doing natural
language processing and computational psycholinguistics for a living;
www.ai.uga.edu/caspr). Life is too short to spend much time arguing about
things that are just differences of terminology, or facts that are perfectly
clear to the experts but are often mis-taught in high schools. So I'll bow
out now. Remember, there are linguists in every college, and linguistics
books in every good library.

Geoffrey Welsh

unread,
Aug 7, 2008, 9:04:39 PM8/7/08
to
MC wrote:
> So I'll bow out now.

That's unfortunate, because you have a knack for explaining the rules... and
far too many posts are littered with errors far beyond what might be
explained by haste or poor typing skills. Not that it's really
telecom-related, but I've also noticed a dramatic increase in grammatical
errors in print media recently, probably due to the downsizing of editing
departments rather than declining skill among editors, but sad because people
aren't going to learn how to read and write correctly if everything they read
is full of errors.

--

Geoffrey Welsh <Geoffrey [dot] Welsh [at] bigfoot [dot] com>

***** Moderator's Note *****

I'll add my regrets: we all like to read clear, concise, and
intelligent posts, and yours were very good.

Wes Leatherock

unread,
Aug 7, 2008, 9:14:31 PM8/7/08
to

"Henry" <henr...@eircom.net <for.addr...@www.ai.uga.edu.slash.mc> wrote:

>> The difference between "its" and "it's" is the same as the difference
>> between "his" and "he's".
>>
>> "He's puzzling." -> "It's puzzling."
>>
>> "his strange attributes" -> "its strange attributes"
>>
>> (Unlike nouns, possessive pronouns, such as "his," don't have an
>> apostrophe.)
>
> Oops. In your example above, 'his strange attributes', "his" is of
> course a possessive _adjective_, not a possessive pronoun.
>

> 'the red BMW is _his_ car' -> adjective, _describing_ 'car'
>
> 'the blue Audi is _his_' -> pronoun, _replacing_ '(Bill's) car'
>
> This can be confusing because in the third person singular (masculine)
> the same form, "his", is used in both instances. With the feminine at
> least there is the difference between 'her' (adjective) and 'hers'
> (pronoun) and with first person singular the distinction is perfectly
> clear:
>
> 'my' -> 'mine'.

A pronoun does not lose its status as a pronoun because it is
used in its attributive or possessive form. It does not "become"
an adjective, it remains a pronoun used in its attiributive sense,
which has the same functions as an adjective.

> Let's not even get started with its / it's :-) -- what a can of
> worms that is! Just the other day I actually saw someone use its' (can
> you imagine?!?).

I never found the distinction be "its" and "it's" a cam of worms,
or even difficult. If you can substitute "it is" for it, it is a
contraction and takes tne apostrophe. If substituting "it is" turns
the meaning into gibberish, use "its."

> Oh, and by the way ... going back to
>

>> (Unlike nouns, possessive pronouns, such as "his," don't have an
>> apostrophe.)
>

> we get your point. But consider this conversation heard daily down the
> pub:
>
> Mike: 'Oh, hallo lads! What'll ye have?'
>
> Bill: 'I'll have a Guinness, please'.
>

> Henry: 'Thanks, mate! Mine's a lager'.
>
> 'Mine' is most definitely a possessive pronoun and that is indubitably
> an apostrophe crept in, there. So, appearances can be deceiving!
>

> cheers,
>
>Henry

Quite clearly, "mine's", in your example, is a contraction of "mine is."


Wes Leatherock
wlea...@yahoo.com
wes...@aol.com

***** Moderator's Note *****

This isn't telecom related, but I'm giving this thread some leeway
because I have to correct a lot of posts which are very hard to
understand in their original form. I'd really like to see better
grammar from some contributors!

MC

unread,
Aug 8, 2008, 1:03:01 PM8/8/08
to
> MC wrote:
>> So I'll bow out now.

> I'll add my regrets: we all like to read clear, concise, and


> intelligent posts, and yours were very good.

Er... I don't mean I'm leaving the group. I just don't want to conduct a
long drawn-out off-topic conversation here. I'll definitely respond to
direct questions!

Thanks for your kind words.

kasa...@gmail.com

unread,
Aug 8, 2008, 1:11:39 PM8/8/08
to

No, actually, the employees are telemarketers working on differnet
campaigns. The different campaigns are seperate and have different
phone lines and caller id displays. Some employees work on more than
one campaign. But when they do, they have to sit at different stations
to call for the different campaigns.

Id like them to sit one desk and have the outgoing phone number
associated with the voice jack at that station switch depending on
which campaign they are logged into.

You're going to have to trust me on this, this is what I want it to
do. (which is what i've been saying from the beginning).

***** Moderator's Note *****

I already trust you; I'm trying to cut your problem down to manageable
size.

There are several systems that will allow your employees to either log
on as a different user, or charge to another a different call-charge
account, either per login or per-call. The system then chooses the
outgoing line based on the account and/or user, so you get the
appropriate caller-id info sent.

There are also systems available which will send appropriate caller-id
info no matter which outgoing trunk a call winds up on: this is also a
common function in upper-end call management systems. Of course, it
requires PRI ISDN service and lot of electronics at your site.

MC

unread,
Aug 8, 2008, 1:12:05 PM8/8/08
to
> A pronoun does not lose its status as a pronoun because it is
> used in its attributive or possessive form. It does not "become"
> an adjective, it remains a pronoun used in its attiributive sense,
> which has the same functions as an adjective.

This is a dispute over terminology, not facts.

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