Canadians Mainly Impressed With Alexa - CBC TV

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EricĐ

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Nov 9, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/9/00
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Funny that the taxpayer-funded TV station would have such an enormous
number of guests cheering the performance of 8% Alexa on the National.

Strange that there were no folks applauding the Alliance.

I notice that even the leftist CCPA Monitor (Canadian Centre for Policy
Alternatives) is now including articles suggesting that CBC television is
a waste of time and money.

Media can lie all they want; but when I hafta pay for it?

E.Schild
haff...@usa.net

JMD

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Nov 10, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/10/00
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Poor Perplexa one-note. No matter what the topic was, Perplexa's
contribution was spend, spend, spend. That woman exists in a 1960s time
warp.

John Dowell


Chris Delanoy

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Nov 10, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/10/00
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EricĐ <EricĐ@hardknocks.edu> wrote in message
news:MPG.1475395c4...@news.uniserve.com...

> Funny that the taxpayer-funded TV station would have such an enormous
> number of guests cheering the performance of 8% Alexa on the National.

I'm sure the perception was quite different for the folks at home. I
suspect that every time she appeared on screen, a vast, vast, majority of
viewers thought "What's wrong with the tint on my TV?"

Chris Delanoy

-----
"An elective despotism was not the government we fought for."
- Thomas Jefferson


Rob McRae

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Nov 10, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/10/00
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how many times did she talk about tax cuts like they were a disease? How can
she sell her party by bad mouthing tax cuts?? Name 5 people in this country
who don't want to keep more of their paycheque.

"Eric©" wrote:

> Funny that the taxpayer-funded TV station would have such an enormous
> number of guests cheering the performance of 8% Alexa on the National.
>

Chris Delanoy

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Nov 10, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/10/00
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Rob McRae <rmc...@nortelnetworks.com> wrote in message
news:3A0C22F7...@nortelnetworks.com...

> how many times did she talk about tax cuts like they were
> a disease?

More disturbing than that is that Stockwell Day never saw the need to
correct her repeated attacks against tax cutting.

Note to Stock: when a socialist schill uses the words "squandering" over
and over and over and over again to refer to tax relief, ATTACK HER ON IT!
But I guess he was too busy saying "Answer my question sir" like some
buffoon.

Wallace J.McLean

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Nov 10, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/10/00
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Why is the CA so shrill about attacking the NDP? Hint: They don't pose the
least bit of threat to you.


--
http://members.xoom.com/labradorian

John Angus

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Nov 10, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/10/00
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"Chris Delanoy" (cdel...@ualberta.ca) writes:
> Rob McRae <rmc...@nortelnetworks.com> wrote in message
> More disturbing than that is that Stockwell Day never saw the need to
> correct her repeated attacks against tax cutting.
>
> Note to Stock: when a socialist schill uses the words "squandering" over
> and over and over and over again to refer to tax relief, ATTACK HER ON IT!

The brief time period permitted to individuals didn't give time
for him to instruct her on economics.

JA


Chris Delanoy

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Nov 10, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/10/00
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John Angus <an...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message
news:8ui09b$gt0$1...@freenet9.carleton.ca...

> > Note to Stock: when a socialist schill uses the words "squandering"
> > over and over and over and over again to refer to tax relief, ATTACK
> > HER ON IT!

> The brief time period permitted to individuals didn't give time
> for him to instruct her on economics.

It takes ten seconds to say: "Alexa, a tax cut is not a government
expenditure and squanders nothing. How dare you suggest that it is
irresponsible to let people keep and spend their own money. It's an insult
to every working family in Canada. Now, getting back to what Jean was
saying..."

There, that's it.

The other missed opportunity was when Chretien ruthlessly spat that the
federal government needs to attack the provinces with a club.

It takes ten seconds today: "A club? That's your idea of cooperation with
the provinces? Well it's not mine, Sir, and I totally reject your barbaric
form of violent federalism."

If I were advising the Alliance, we'd be running TV ads next week depicting
Chretien as a neanderthal holding onto a struggling woman (with the word
"provinces" written across her, of course) by her hair, about to beat her
with a club. His own words would provide the damning voiceover.

John Angus

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Nov 10, 2000, 11:09:13 PM11/10/00
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"Chris Delanoy" (cdel...@ualberta.ca) writes:
> John Angus <an...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message
>> The brief time period permitted to individuals didn't give time
>> for him to instruct her on economics.
>
> It takes ten seconds to say: "Alexa, a tax cut is not a government
> expenditure and squanders nothing. How dare you suggest that it is

To what end? Do you think that would have shut her up or convince
her of the errors of her ways? Do you think it would change the
minds of the people who liked her message? The people she
was appealing to, the people considering voting for that kind of message
would not, under any circumstances, even consider voting for the
Alliance. Why should he waste his precious time on her?

> If I were advising the Alliance, we'd be running TV ads next week depicting
> Chretien as a neanderthal holding onto a struggling woman (with the word
> "provinces" written across her, of course) by her hair, about to beat her
> with a club. His own words would provide the damning voiceover.

I think they'd do better to start offering up their policies,
policies the way he did in his opening statement.


JA

Chris Delanoy

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Nov 11, 2000, 2:22:17 AM11/11/00
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John Angus <an...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message
news:8uigp9$bpg$1...@freenet9.carleton.ca...

> > It takes ten seconds to say: "Alexa, a tax cut is not a government
> > expenditure and squanders nothing. How dare you suggest that it is

> To what end? Do you think that would have shut her up or
> convince her of the errors of her ways?

John, I think you're entirely missing the point of having a debate. The
purpose is not to convince other leaders of anything - its to let the
viewers know what you're willing to fight for, especially to reassure those
who are already voting or close to voting for you.

> Do you think it would change the minds of the people
> who liked her message?

No - it would impress the people at home who are just as outraged at her
comments as you are. That's the point, John. Nobody is trying to convince
the opposite side of anything.

> Why should he waste his precious time on her?

He should "waste" his "precious time" defending his platform. Not once the
whole time did Day ever mention his plan for tax relief - the central item
in the Alliance agenda. And yet the opportunity to forcefully do so was
repeatedly offered to him.

EricĐ

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Nov 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/11/00
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Chris Delanoy wrote...

>
> More disturbing than that is that Stockwell Day never saw the need to
> correct her repeated attacks against tax cutting.

It was her arguments against everything, actually. In retrospect I
figured that Day was told that there are seats in BC that swing NDP-
Reform, and that he'd be best off ignoring her.

If I wanted a prop that would've won me the election, guaranteed, it
would've been a cork to shove in that buttmunch McDorknobs mouth. There
is no law in even the most despotic nations of the world demanding that
the rest of humanity be screamed at irrationally, with their having no
say in the matter . . .

I mean, if they wanted to get marginal radicals out there; why not have
the CCPML?

E.Schild
haff...@usa.net


EricĐ

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Nov 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/11/00
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Chris Delanoy wrote...

> He should "waste" his "precious time" defending his platform. Not once the
> whole time did Day ever mention his plan for tax relief - the central item
> in the Alliance agenda. And yet the opportunity to forcefully do so was
> repeatedly offered to him.

That's a stupid platform. He knows no-one watching TV cares about that.
The Canadian media created the healthcare crisis early this year.
Apparently having one or two folks in your jursdiction die of old age, or
because they drank themselves silly, is now a political foible and
somehow my fault. . .

They care about the stuff they're told to by the people they see on their
TV. Canadians should be told that they are paying 2500 bucks per person,
per annum to fund the current system. And yet, if you visit a doctor in
BC without the required 'Care' card, you pay about $35. Man, if I could
bow out of this pro-sickness system, I would, and I've tried, but it's
now illegal.

E.Schild
haff...@usa.net


JMD

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Nov 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/11/00
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Any five? How about Carrick, Archie, DayDigger (aka Autotrader) Yew,
Kaasgard (sp?). Now if you had asked that we name five mentally balanced
people, that would have been more difficult.

John Dowell

"Rob McRae" <rmc...@nortelnetworks.com> wrote in message

news:3A0C22F7...@nortelnetworks.com...

John Angus

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Nov 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/11/00
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EricĐ (EricĐ@hardknocks.edu) writes:
> That's a stupid platform. He knows no-one watching TV cares about that.
> The Canadian media created the healthcare crisis early this year.
> Apparently having one or two folks in your jursdiction die of old age, or
> because they drank themselves silly, is now a political foible and
> somehow my fault. . .

There are currently people in Ontario who need orthopedic surgery and
are living months (the average wait is 18 months) in pain because
there aren't enough operating rooms or nurses. I don't consider
that to be acceptable, nor even close to acceptable. Likewise I
find the idea that people must wait months to use a diagnostic tool
like an MRI to be absolutely unacceptable. Another problem is operations
for cancer patients. As with the others, there are now months long
waits before people with cancer can be operated on. In Ottawa, the
waiting time for ambulances in emergency cases is three times the
national average. The average wait for a taxi is half what it is
for an ambulance.

Not only do I not consider the problems with health care to be made
up by the media but I'm losing my patience with the Harris government,
and if things don't improve by the next election I will be voting
against them. Given the alternaties, I might have to hold my nose to do it,
but I will.


JA

EricĐ

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Nov 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/11/00
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John Angus wrote...

> There are currently people in Ontario who need orthopedic surgery and
> are living months (the average wait is 18 months) in pain because
> there aren't enough operating rooms or nurses. I don't consider
> that to be acceptable, nor even close to acceptable. Likewise I
> find the idea that people must wait months to use a diagnostic tool
> like an MRI to be absolutely unacceptable. Another problem is operations
> for cancer patients. As with the others, there are now months long
> waits before people with cancer can be operated on. In Ottawa, the
> waiting time for ambulances in emergency cases is three times the
> national average. The average wait for a taxi is half what it is
> for an ambulance.

10 years ago I ripped open my hand and severed some tendons. I lay (in a
considerable amount of pain) in an emergency ward in one hospital for 12
hours waiting for treatment (due to closed operating theatres), and was
then carted across town to another hospital, finally having surgery 14
hours after the original accident. The nurses were worked off their
feet, and there were people in beds in hallways due to overcrowding
(Royal Jubilee in Victoria BC). Ten years ago.

Sure I'm getting pretty bombastic in my posts these days, but my central
point is I think a valid one - that the media have discovered healthcare
as an issue lately and are bombarding their consumers with stories which
seem to suggest that our great system has suddenly crapped out. In fact
it's been crapping out for a long time.

>
> Not only do I not consider the problems with health care to be made
> up by the media but I'm losing my patience with the Harris government,
> and if things don't improve by the next election I will be voting
> against them. Given the alternaties, I might have to hold my nose to do it,
> but I will.

Which party will fix your healthcare system? In BC it's the NDP
socialists who are apparently to blame for the crisis; in Ontario it's
the 'right wing' Harris gov't. Is there any province currently not
having a crisis?

The _only_ solutions I hear from our 'leaders' are a) spend more money;
and b) give more money to private clinics. That's pretty pathetic.

E.Schild
haff...@usa.net

John Angus

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Nov 11, 2000, 7:39:09 PM11/11/00
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EricĐ (EricĐ@hardknocks.edu) writes:
>> Not only do I not consider the problems with health care to be made
>> up by the media but I'm losing my patience with the Harris government,
>> and if things don't improve by the next election I will be voting
>> against them. Given the alternaties, I might have to hold my nose to do it,
>> but I will.
>
> Which party will fix your healthcare system?

I don't know. But if we keep firing the ones who don't
perhaps we'll run into someone who gets inspired. I
have given Harris, I think, just about long enough now.
I voted for him the last election because I know
it takes time to turn around a system as big and in
as much dissaray as ours. But there are things which could
be done reasonably quickly (like buying more MRIs and
fixing the problem of ambulance response times)
which are not being done, and it is just about time
to give up on him and try someone else.

Tax cuts are all very well and good, but not while
we have half the number of ambulances on the road
as we should have, and a large number of those are
old and broken down.


JA

JMD

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Nov 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/12/00
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Eric, you point out exactly why we need to debate alternatives to our
universal health care. The system has been breaking down for a long time
and throwing more money at a flawed system may improve things somewhat in
the short run but it cannot fix the real problems. It would only result in
more waste of precious resources. Frankly, I don't think we can afford to
fully fund the health care system we have in Canada, especially with the
boomer bulge approaching elderly status.

Exactly what is wrong? Dunno. What should we do? Dunno. We need to talk
about these things and stop demonizing anyone who even hints that the great
Canada Health Act was not handed down from God on carved stone tablets.
Questioning the Canada Health Act and the system it has spawned is now
regarded as heresy in Canada. This attitude will only delay reforms and
hasten the inevitable collapse of whole damn thing (if it hasn't collapsed
already).

John Dowell

JMD

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Nov 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/12/00
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John, why not have private MRI clinics? They could do this job within the
financial structure of the public system but far more cheaply than hospitals
because they wouldn't have all the overhead hospitals have. Except for
acute care, hospitals are a pretty damned expensive and inefficient way to
deliver health care. Yet we equate the availability of hospital services
with the well-being of the entire health care delivery system.

Private diagnostic clinics make sense to me but the left would scream that
it is two-tier or represents the Americanization of our health care system.

John Dowell

"John Angus" <an...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message

news:8ukord$n6t$1...@freenet9.carleton.ca...

E. Barry Bruyea

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Nov 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/12/00
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On Sun, 12 Nov 2000 06:46:09 -0500, "JMD" <word...@nospamstorm.ca>
wrote:

>John, why not have private MRI clinics? They could do this job within the
>financial structure of the public system but far more cheaply than hospitals
>because they wouldn't have all the overhead hospitals have. Except for
>acute care, hospitals are a pretty damned expensive and inefficient way to
>deliver health care. Yet we equate the availability of hospital services
>with the well-being of the entire health care delivery system.
>
>Private diagnostic clinics make sense to me but the left would scream that
>it is two-tier or represents the Americanization of our health care system.
>
>John Dowell

What's the difference with private abortion clinics? They've always
existed and I haven't heard anyone on the left complain about
privatizing in that case.

>
>"John Angus" <an...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message

>news:8ukord$n6t$1...@freenet9.carleton.ca...

RES

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Nov 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/12/00
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E. Barry Bruyea wrote:
>
> On Sun, 12 Nov 2000 06:46:09 -0500, "JMD" <word...@nospamstorm.ca>
> wrote:
>
> >John, why not have private MRI clinics? They could do this job within the
> >financial structure of the public system but far more cheaply than hospitals
> >because they wouldn't have all the overhead hospitals have. Except for
> >acute care, hospitals are a pretty damned expensive and inefficient way to
> >deliver health care. Yet we equate the availability of hospital services
> >with the well-being of the entire health care delivery system.
> >
> >Private diagnostic clinics make sense to me but the left would scream that
> >it is two-tier or represents the Americanization of our health care system.
> >
> >John Dowell
>
> What's the difference with private abortion clinics? They've always
> existed and I haven't heard anyone on the left complain about
> privatizing in that case.
>

Morganthaler was told to 'take a hike' in NDP Manitoba! There goes that
theory. RES


> >
> >"John Angus" <an...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message

> >news:8ukord$n6t$1...@freenet9.carleton.ca...


> >But there are things which could
> >> be done reasonably quickly (like buying more MRIs and
> >> fixing the problem of ambulance response times)
> >> which are not being done, and it is just about time
> >> to give up on him and try someone else.
> >>
> >> Tax cuts are all very well and good, but not while
> >> we have half the number of ambulances on the road
> >> as we should have, and a large number of those are
> >> old and broken down.
> >>
> >>
> >> JA
> >
> >

--
-----------------------------------------------------
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RES

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Nov 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/12/00
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While I support the tightening up of the Canada Health Act and the
preservation of our medicare system, I recognize a day of reckoning is
approaching no matter what system is in place. Frankly, political
parties will be the 2nd last to come to grips with the underlying
problem in our health care system ( the media will be last), and that is
the epidemic of chronic degenerative disease. Last year 70% of North
Americans died with one. It's predicted that 83% of North Americans now
living will die with a chronic degenerative disease (Source: Centres for
Disease Control - Atlanta: Statistics Division). This will overwhelm any
system's ability to cope. Individuals should and can take personal
control over their health given that these diseases are EASILY
PREVENTABLE.

Now the argument that totally privatizing health may spur lifestyle
changes is interesting. Trouble is a great many people will die
needlessly for lack of proper care in the short and medium term.

Having said all that, the universal system is the most efficient way of
spending health dollars. Tamper with it and we reduce our
'competitiveness' as a country. RES

E. Barry Bruyea

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Nov 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/12/00
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On Sun, 12 Nov 2000 17:28:48 GMT, RES <resc...@home.com> wrote:

>E. Barry Bruyea wrote:
>>
>> On Sun, 12 Nov 2000 06:46:09 -0500, "JMD" <word...@nospamstorm.ca>
>> wrote:
>>
>> >John, why not have private MRI clinics? They could do this job within the
>> >financial structure of the public system but far more cheaply than hospitals
>> >because they wouldn't have all the overhead hospitals have. Except for
>> >acute care, hospitals are a pretty damned expensive and inefficient way to
>> >deliver health care. Yet we equate the availability of hospital services
>> >with the well-being of the entire health care delivery system.
>> >
>> >Private diagnostic clinics make sense to me but the left would scream that
>> >it is two-tier or represents the Americanization of our health care system.
>> >
>> >John Dowell
>>
>> What's the difference with private abortion clinics? They've always
>> existed and I haven't heard anyone on the left complain about
>> privatizing in that case.
>>
>
>Morganthaler was told to 'take a hike' in NDP Manitoba! There goes that
>theory. RES

I hate to be the one to bring this to your attention, but there are a
few other provinces in our confederation.

>> >
>> >"John Angus" <an...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message

>> >news:8ukord$n6t$1...@freenet9.carleton.ca...


>> >But there are things which could
>> >> be done reasonably quickly (like buying more MRIs and
>> >> fixing the problem of ambulance response times)
>> >> which are not being done, and it is just about time
>> >> to give up on him and try someone else.
>> >>
>> >> Tax cuts are all very well and good, but not while
>> >> we have half the number of ambulances on the road
>> >> as we should have, and a large number of those are
>> >> old and broken down.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> JA
>> >
>> >
>

Patriot

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Nov 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/12/00
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>John, why not have private MRI clinics? They could do this job within the
>financial structure of the public system but far more cheaply than
hospitals
>because they wouldn't have all the overhead hospitals have. Except for


Bull. Funny thing about this is how the right screeches that this is the
case, but when asked to provide ANY proof, suddenly poof!...nothing. Funny
how those who support these private clinics and two tier health care are
those who stand to get wealthiest off of it....particularly many right wing
leeches who would recieve public funds for their own clinics.
The health care system has been deliberately decimated. We can afford it.
There are certain special interests who have a stake in making it seem like
we can't.


EricĐ

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Nov 13, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/13/00
to
JMD wrote...

> Eric, you point out exactly why we need to debate alternatives to our
> universal health care. The system has been breaking down for a long time
> and throwing more money at a flawed system may improve things somewhat in
> the short run but it cannot fix the real problems. It would only result in
> more waste of precious resources. Frankly, I don't think we can afford to
> fully fund the health care system we have in Canada, especially with the
> boomer bulge approaching elderly status.

Especially with that, yes. The great mass of people born in the 50's
will be needing far more medical care in 10 or 15 years than they do now.
Canada has money to spend at the moment, but who knows about next year or
the year after?



> Exactly what is wrong? Dunno. What should we do? Dunno. We need to talk
> about these things and stop demonizing anyone who even hints that the great
> Canada Health Act was not handed down from God on carved stone tablets.
> Questioning the Canada Health Act and the system it has spawned is now
> regarded as heresy in Canada. This attitude will only delay reforms and
> hasten the inevitable collapse of whole damn thing (if it hasn't collapsed
> already).

Well, I was wondering how many MRI's were being done in the mid-70's in
Canada (when, by most accounts the world was the country's oyster).
None, is my guess.

Technological innovation will continue to find new, more expensive drugs
and medical procedures; but at some point, we'll have to say sorry, we
can't afford that. Even now most provinces refuse to fund certain drugs
that have been shown to be clearly beneficial, on account of cost.

Childhood asthma occurrence has quadrupled since the early 70's, and many
kids carry inhalers to school with them now. As someone pointed out in
another thread, most of our healthcare expenditure involves treating
lifestyle-related illnesses, such as cancers, heart disease and stroke
etc.

If the country is worried about healthcare funding, then I think stats
indicating that a third of Canadian schoolkids are now obese, and
exercise 50% less than they did 30 years ago; and that Canadians in
general are becoming more sedentary, mean we are going the wrong way
here.

I think the inevitable answer is that the system should encourage non-
use, and prevention. If you keep crashing your car, you pay more for
insurance, right? Healthy people should not be dragged down by the self-
inflicted unhealthy to such an extent that the whole system breaks
down. There are many different ways to effect this, but the problem is
that certain segments of the population (with the ear of the media)
refuse to talk about it.

E.Schild
haff...@usa.net


John Angus

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Nov 13, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/13/00
to
"Patriot" (do...@spam.me) writes:
>>John, why not have private MRI clinics? They could do this job within the
>>financial structure of the public system but far more cheaply than
> hospitals
>>because they wouldn't have all the overhead hospitals have. Except for
>
> Bull. Funny thing about this is how the right screeches that this is the
> case, but when asked to provide ANY proof, suddenly poof!...nothing

What proof do you need? There are private, for-fee MRI clinics in Quebec
now. People who have the money, or are willing to pay extra, or have
extra insurance, can get complete diagnostics in days rather than
waiting months in the public system. And if those private clinics
are shut down what happens to all those people? Why they go back
into the line for the public diagnostics, and the line gets longer
and longer.

. Funny
> how those who support these private clinics and two tier health care are
> those who stand to get wealthiest off of it..

I don't stand to make a dime off private clinics, and probably couldn't
afford to use them either. But I believe bringing in some private money
from those who can afford it is the only way we'll be able to afford health
care in the coming years, as the boomers get older and require more and
more health care services.

> The health care system has been deliberately decimated.

Well, if that's true, then the solution does not seem to be,
as most Canadians appear to believe, to re-elect the people
who decimated it.

JA

One In A Million

unread,
Nov 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/14/00
to
How many MRI's done in the 70's ?
That's easy ! None . It wasn't invented until the late 80's

-- Denni$
Go Ahead Make Me Play !

"RES" <resc...@home.com> wrote in message
news:3A0ED613...@home.com...


> JMD wrote:
> >
> > Eric, you point out exactly why we need to debate alternatives to our
> > universal health care. The system has been breaking down for a long
time
> > and throwing more money at a flawed system may improve things somewhat
in
> > the short run but it cannot fix the real problems. It would only result
in
> > more waste of precious resources. Frankly, I don't think we can afford
to
> > fully fund the health care system we have in Canada, especially with the
> > boomer bulge approaching elderly status.
> >

> > Exactly what is wrong? Dunno. What should we do? Dunno. We need to
talk
> > about these things and stop demonizing anyone who even hints that the
great
> > Canada Health Act was not handed down from God on carved stone tablets.
> > Questioning the Canada Health Act and the system it has spawned is now
> > regarded as heresy in Canada. This attitude will only delay reforms and
> > hasten the inevitable collapse of whole damn thing (if it hasn't
collapsed
> > already).
> >

Dick Freeman

unread,
Nov 21, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/21/00
to

"Chris Delanoy" <cdel...@ualberta.ca> wrote in message
news:8uh777$lre$1...@pulp.srv.ualberta.ca...

> EricĐ <EricĐ@hardknocks.edu> wrote in message
> news:MPG.1475395c4...@news.uniserve.com...
>
> > Funny that the taxpayer-funded TV station would have such an enormous
> > number of guests cheering the performance of 8% Alexa on the National.
>
> I'm sure the perception was quite different for the folks at home. I
> suspect that every time she appeared on screen, a vast, vast, majority of
> viewers thought "What's wrong with the tint on my TV?"
>
> Chris Delanoy

Do not adjust your TV set. Alexa's green tint is a sign of decomposition,
which the entire NDP is currently undergoing. Sure, it looks ugly and it has
a very bad smell, but soon they will be gone and the worms will feast.

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