Re: bike theft reduction

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Colin Leath

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Mar 12, 2015, 11:57:19 PM3/12/15
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Looking ahead to the next MACB meeting,

We're supposed to have our proposal in by April 7. A week before the meeting.

If we do meet in person about this, it could be some time between March 31 and 4/7. Or we could try to do it all online.

I recommend we each write up our own proposals as if they were the one going to be approved by the committee.

Actually, perhaps we could each write up two proposals:
  1. very close to status quo (as little effort and magic and money to implement as possible, very close to doing nothing)---
  2. pie in the sky: e.g. unlimited funding, unlimited city/state/county support. Sci fi technology (gps tracking via a nearly invisible device; unlimited drone surveillance. . . things like that), paying or otherwise rewarding people for the kind of behavior we hope to see.


We could all think about the process of how bikes could be registered, possibly tracked, and recovered if stolen.

We can try registering our bikes with bikeindex or any other site we might want to recommend that the city /state/county use. If we want to recommend a particular site in our proposal we should be able to say why. . .

We can possibly solve more issues than just theft by whatever solution we recommend (if bikes are being tracked, could people be paid for the miles they ride. . . to encourage clean transit, public health?).

Below are just some more google searches that could help inspire thoughts on this issue.

It is conceivable that technology could put an end to this problem.

I think the advent of bike sharing in the city and the infrastructure installed there could be helpful in some way.

Also:

or

just as an experiment-- (I'm always afraid of sending people emails they don't want. . . lists/communities could make it easier for people to opt in or out-- or maybe it is overkill for what we're doing now)

Perhaps we could use one. (I'm more comfortable and familiar with email lists if we have to choose one)


At any rate, I'll write up a proposal or two at some point and post it/them.



Until next time!

Colin Leath
+1 805 699 6411
purl.org/colinleath

On 10 March 2015 at 18:27, YinYang <perfectpa...@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi Colin

Thanks for your thoughts and writing. Soha and I were just discussing this very thing an hour or so ago. I was wondering if the registration process was in any way effective as it relates to bicycle theft in Honolulu and the surrounding areas. Maybe some sort of toll can be taken from a pool of registered bicyclists in the city to determine if the registration has resulted in a recovery of a stolen bicycle. If only a few people out of 3000 have had their stolen bicycles recovered as a result of registration, then maybe registration as an ineffective tool should be discarded or improved to include maybe a free lock or again a free locator which is registered with HPD.

On a related note. Although many seem to think it's a long shot, it's my thought that we should in fact expect law enforcement to take bicycle theft as seriously as they would if a car was stolen. Many of the bicycles ridden in our city approach the price one would pay for a used car. Hawaii law for shoplifting imposes a class C felony charge if theft is committed over the amount of $300. Is it possible that automobiles generate more revenue for the city and as a result are taken more seriously when a bicycle is stolen? Either way if the registration process is effective in reducing bicycle theft than I'm all for it, but if it's really not then what's the use.

I also agree, we don't have to reinvent the wheel. Just maybe promote Bike Index on Craigslist and other places bikers frequent.
I'll take the time to check out those other links you posted as well.

As a tax time is upon many of us, maybe it would be a good time to assess why we are paying taxes to our city? If in fact our tax dollars are going to pay the salaries of government employees and law enforcement; then in my opinion, we should expect bicycle theft to be taken seriously by those who we pay to care. This isn't to suggest we wait for law enforcement, but continue to move forward with implementing some effective solutions to curb theft. While moving forward, as a tax payer I'd like to see law enforcement do more to address this issue as well.

Also, here's a few links on what others in the world are doing to deal with bicycle theft.



I'm including the rest of those interested in the discussion on this email. For those included on this email, please share ideas and things as a group we'd like to address and ideas on how we can accomplish some of these ideas. If it's important for us to meet outside of MACB please throw out some ideas on when and where?

Again, thanks for writing.

In health
Sentwali



On Tue, Mar 10, 2015 at 4:39 PM, Colin Leath <colin...@gmail.com> wrote:
Soha and Sentwali,

Here's some things I wrote up a while ago that could be helpful: (full doc is at bit.ly/opposebiketax )

Just as a shortcut-- sf, portland seemed to have pretty easy sites.
sf: http://www.safebikes.org/
portland: http://bikeportland.org/register-your-stolen-bike

(Portland is just piggybacking on bikeindex.org)


I really doubt we need a separate hawaii-focused system or even an app--

https://www.google.com/search?q=bike+registration+app

maybe just a mobile-browser friendly web site would be enough to start.

http://hotpads.com/blog/2014/11/preventing-bike-thievery/

People in hawaii are already using
https://bikeindex.org/bikes/39292


Basically-- I think we need to lose the bike registration fee-- it is worthless in my opinion and discourages biking / increases the cost of biking and fear of police taking bikes if you're a homeless person and haven't paid to register a bike.

To get it repealed we would need to have a bill introduced in the next legislative session (we'd need to be ready by January 2016 to introduce it, have a legislator sponsor it.)

Then everyone who wants to register their bike can use something like bikeindex.org

and we get the registration out of the hands of the police who appear not to be managed in a very progressive manner.







Registration programs in bike friendly/ bike progressive areas:


And, going forward, perhaps do some research on how to reduce bicycle theft:





--
S&S
 
 
The Dali Lama, when asked what surprised him about humanity “Man, because he sacrifices his health in order to make money.  Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die and then dies having never really lived."
 

Daniel Alexander

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Mar 13, 2015, 4:57:22 PM3/13/15
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Hey Bike Theft Reduction team, 
First, I would recommend we have a meeting. If we could open this up, I'm sure there are a couple others that would be interested in contributing. Want to have this at the HBL office (3442 Waialae)? Let's do it sooner than later. Evening or weekends work fine with me. Thoughts? 

Next, it's useful to build our recommendations on the Oahu Bike Plan (http://www.honolulu.gov/bicycle/oahubikeplan.html), as this is what the City turns to as their primary guide for bike-related investments and policy decisions.  
The Oahu Bike Plan includes: 
  • Reducing bike theft is included as one of 14 objectives of the plan - Objective #7 "Reduce the number of bicycle theft"
  • The plan identifies four tactics for reducing bike theft (I've attached the table outlining these): 
    • Install parking in high visibility areas
    • Bike lockers
    • Obtain HPD bike theft data (the plan doesn't state what would be done with this data)
    • Establish attended bike parking at high volume destinations
  • The first three are to occur within 2 years of the plan date (so by 2014) and the latter is to occur by the 10 year mark (so 2022)

I think it would useful to arrange our recommended actions based the primary responsible party. On first thought, I'm seeing the following: HPD, City Registration office, City DTS, UHM, other university/college and other govt facility management, legislature/council, community/non-profit, bike shops/other businesses selling bike related items, and property manager. Here's a start of some ideas: 

HPD (Yamato, I know you researched the HPD/Registration office relationship. Please expand/correct)
- Bike theft decoy/sting program
- Improve system of reporting theft to City Registration office, such to reduce the time between a theft and Registration office record of theft. 
- Provide data on bike thefts, including theft location map. 
- Use theft data to identify hot spots and step up enforcement in these areas. 

City Registration office
- Convert the paper bike registration database into a digital one, such to provide better, more up to date, and more accessible information on bike theft
- Work with HPD to improve system of reporting theft, such to reduce the time between a theft and Registration office record of theft. 
- Provide data on bike thefts in coordination with HPD
- Create a RFID/GPS option registration program, whereby someone can pay more to have a tracking device on the their bike

City DTS
- Provide sufficient short-term parking and place in high visibility areas
- Install bike parking appendages to allow for meters and streets signs to be used as legal bike parking. This is particularly useful in high demand areas such as Waikiki. 
- Establish long term parking program by installing bike lockers in high demand areas. 
- Education on the importance of and proper way to lock a bike, via website, social media and public outreach. 
- Use bike theft data to evaluate where additional parking is needed, where parking may be moved or otherwise modified. 
- Work with HPD to create a map that identifies high theft areas and make this available to the public

UHM and other university/college and govt facility management.
- Provide sufficient short-term parking and place in high visibility areas
- Establish long term parking program by installing bike lockers in high demand areas. 
- Educate students/employees/affiliates on the importance of and proper way to lock a bike, via website, social media and public outreach. 
- Track bike theft to identify hot spots and other trends
- Use security personnel and video surveillance to address bike theft

Legislature/Council
- Law requiring all new buildings provide short and long term bike parking
- Law allowing bike parking to offset car parking requirements
- Law requiring that all buildings allow bicycle to be brought inside (think about this more, made limit to residential buildings)
- Law increasing the penalty for bike theft

Community/non-profit
- Education on the importance of and proper way to lock a bike, via websites, social media, workshops, and other outreach.
- Create and distribute poster/flyer/other media on importance of proper locking/other theft reduction tactics, distribute to bike shops
- Encourage the use of Bike Index or other available tracking service 
- Create online forum to post bike thefts (seems this already happening on Craigslist, does it make sense to create another forum?)

Bike shops
- Educate customers on the importance of and proper way to lock a bike. 
- Provide RFID/GPS bike tracking equipment for sale
- Provide "bike packages" that include bike, lights, and lock at discounted rate for the package

Property managers
- Provide sufficient short and long-term parking in a high visibility area, with surveillance, if possible. 
- Provide short term parking in a prominent place, ideally as close to the entrance as any car parking. 
- Allow people to bring bicycles into the building
- Change out older/less functional parking (i.e. "wheel bender racks") with multi point of contact parking


Thanks! 
Daniel 
--
Daniel Alexander
Advocacy, Planning, and Communication Director
Hawaii Bicycling League

Be an advocate for a bicycle-friendly Hawaii! 





Table 11_Theft Objective_Oahu Bike Plan.pdf

Milner, Yamato

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Mar 13, 2015, 8:15:40 PM3/13/15
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Hi Everyone,

 

It would be great if the Bike Theft Reduction group could identify ways in which the city could improve bicycle registration and theft reduction.

 

I’d like to give some background information on how bicycle registration and theft is currently being treated so that we all understand the current situation.

 

 

Bicycle Registration

Bicycles and mopeds are registered in the same manner, have the same fee and receive the same sticker to put on the body of the bike or moped. Registration is done by the Customer Service Department (CSD). The main registration office is in Kaimuki/Kapahulu right under the H1 bridge next to Market City Foodland. It’s called the Kapahulu Reconstruction Station (1112 Kapahulu Ave) and is open M-F 7am – 3:45pm. You can also go to any satellite city hall which is open M-F typically until 4pm but Alamoana is open until 5pm. The registration fee must be paid with cash or checks only.

 

If you are registering a bike that has never been registered, for example you shipped your bike from the mainland, then you must fill out the “Registration Form”. If you buy a used bicycle from someone else, you must do a transfer of ownership. You can download forms from the CSD website http://www.honolulu.gov/cms-csd-menu/site-csd-sitearticles/6435-forms-on-line.html The main “Registration Form” is only available at the offices and not available online because they use carbon paper to make two copies of your form.

 

If you buy your bicycle from a shop, the shop owner is required to have you fill out the registration form, you pay the store the $15 registration fee and the store will be responsible for submitting the forms to the registration office.

 

Bicycle Registration Office number: (808) 733-2540 There are two ladies who man this office and they are extremely busy.

Bike must be registered if it has two tandem wheels 20” or larger in diameter.

Registration has a one-time $15 fee.

Initial application must show proof of ownership: Bill of sale, receipt, or affidavit

Must be 18 year old or older to register bike.

Replacement sticker requires form and fee $2

To transfer bike ownership: Seller and buyer must sign registration form & pay fee $5 if registration is done within 30 days of transfer. $15 if after 30 days

 

You do not have to bring your bike to the office in order to register it. You do not have to be present when submitting your registration form, anyone can submit the form on your behalf. You may submit the forms through the mail with a check.

 

 

Bicycle Parking

Chris Sayers, in the traffic engineering division within DTS, installs and maintains all the public bicycle racks on sidewalks. These include all the bike shaped bike racks. If a bicycle rack is located at a bus terminal, it is maintained and installed by the paratransit division (PTD) within DTS. If the bicycle rack is located in a park, it is maintained and installed by the department of parks and recreation. The City currently does not have any long term bicycle parking (bicycle parking that is enclosed). DTS is looking to create them at all bus transit stops and is currently planning a pilot project at the Alapai bus transit stop.

 

 

Bicycle Theft Reporting

The Honolulu Police Department (HPD) will file reports of stolen bicycles. If your bicycle is stolen, you must make a police report by calling 911, waiting for the officer to arrive, and giving the officer your information and bicycle information. They will record the bicycle serial number and bicycle registration number if you have that available. If you have your bicycle registered, they can look up your name and see all the bicycles that are registered under your name. Once you make a report, you will get a report number. HPD then enters your report into their database. They are months behind in entering reports into their database. This database is not linked to CSD.  

 

Bicycle Recovery

If a bicycle is found, HPD is able to search the serial number or bicycle registration number to see if the bicycle was reported as stolen. If it was reported to be stolen, they will contact the owner by mail. The owner can then come to pick up the bicycle from HPD within 30 days. Once a bike is found, the status of the report in the database will be changed from Stolen to Stolen/Recovered. If the owner does not contact HPD and does not recover their bicycle, HPD will auction off the bicycle. The auction is currently done by shipping the bikes approximately every 4 months to the mainland where a private company called propertyroom.com will auction the bikes. The City of Honolulu receives half the proceeds from the auction.

 

Bicycle Theft Stats

HPD is federally required to report the number of stolen bicycles on an annual basis in their annual report. The latest annual report available is 2012. http://www.honolulupd.org/information/index.php?page=annual

Below are the stats on the bicycle thefts for the past years:

 

Year

Stolen

Value

Yearly % change

2008

522

 $186,322

N/A

2009

828

 $377,284

159%

2010

860

 $364,409

104%

2011

1,077

 $453,195

125%

2012

1,101

 $443,736

102%

 

Stats show a doubling of bicycle theft over a 5 year period.

 

Bicycle recovery rates are not reported and HPD is unable to do a simple search. In order to know the recovery rate, someone must manually go through the year’s reports and see which ones have a status changed to Stolen/Recovered.

 

 

Attached is the MACB letter submitted back in 2013 advocating for a coordinated database systems between CSD and HPD. I don’t think this letter ever made it to the Mayor or the other departments. If this is the only recommendation from MACB, I’ll resubmit this letter, however, if MACB is going to recommend many things, I’d prefer to submit all the recommendations at once. If the Bike Theft Reduction group can provide a report that can be endorsed by MACB, DTS will be able to review it and recommend it to the Mayor, CDS, and/or HPD. Because bicycle theft reduction spans multiple city departments, it will require more coordination between departments and response times should be expected to be slower. Please remember to be persistent but patient as the city has many issues to address and it takes time to implement a plan regardless of how good it is.  

 

 

 

 

Yamato Milner

(808)768-8312


130820 MABC Letter.pdf

YinYang

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Mar 13, 2015, 9:12:51 PM3/13/15
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Hello all

My apologies in advance for all the typos and bad grammar. I was a math major in college and hated english... :)
Just a little input relating to the objectives of the Oahu Bike Plan. I noticed that Objective 1 is to "Increase the number of people who ride bicycles".

As a thought, this general objective could easily be seen to be synonymous with ways in which to motivate more people to ride bicycles.
This first objective relating to ways in which to movitave more people to ride bicycles obviously has the converse built in....eg what would deter people from riding and continuing to use bicycles as their primary mode of transportation. 
It's my opinion that as bicycle theft increases, we will see the inverse as it relates to the amount of people who decide
to make the bicycle their go to mode of transportation in and around Oahu. From a statistical perspective...what we may see
is an initial surge in the number of people riding bicycles with the pretty amazing King Street track and other safe riding lanes; however, in the long run...I don't think this increase in bicycle riders will be sustainable if theft continues to increase without recourse.

My wife and I could be thought of as the exception....two people who love riding and will not be deterred even after having two bicycles stolen. After the average rider who's excited about riding her or his bicycle to the store, school, work etc experiences the theft of their bike and the inadequacy of our law enforcement relating to resolving their issue...this same person will most likely not invest another $500.00 - $xxxx.00 dollars for a second bike..only for it to get stolen again.

IMO, here is where the number of riders will evenutally decrease if theft isn't brought under control.
I bring this up because, it's my logic that (after accessibility to safe and convenient routes to ride), theft may be the
next big factor dictating whether or not someone will continue riding...hence meeting objective 1 of the Oahu Bike Plan. 

I'm bringing this up because Objective 1 could be seen to include theft since theft and a poor recovery record could be seen as counterproductive to increasing the number of people who ride bicycles in this state where the weather is favorable for riding all year long.

Soha and I discussed how it could be beneficial to collect our own data by contacting every bicycle shop in the area to see if it's possible for them to have their customers who purchase bicycles or related gear to fill out a short 4 question survey. Maybe this can be accomplished in a paperless manner...not sure.

1. Have you or do you plan on registering your bicycle?
2. Has your bicycle ever been stolen in Oahu?
3. Was your bicycle recovered by law enforcement?
4. Do you feel that the registration process helped you to recover your stolen bicycle if it has in fact been recovered?

If the LBS's are not willing to do this, we are willing to take time over the next 30-90 days to survey customers ourselves
on our free time.  We could potentially set up shop at the most popular bike shops around the city.  With out making any assumptions about the effectiveness of registration as it relates to theft.....it was our hope, if everyone thinks this is a worthwhile project, that if enough people in our group could donate an hour a week to rotate at convenient bicycle shops during peak hours...maybe we could get a feel of whether the registration process is effective or needs to be improved. We thought of completing this before we went forward with a proposal for the MACB April meeting since we don't have direct access to registration data and or
reported bike theft data to compare with bikes which have been recovered as a result of this registration process.

After getting some data, our proposal would be a little more focused. If the process of registration is not effective, then our proposal would
be to revamp it to include ways to deter theft. This would possibly promote sustained bicycle use in Oahu as more people begin to feel safe to ride as opposed to someone spending ~$1200.00 on their shiny new Specialized plus the price of a lock, helmet, other gear, plus 15 dollars for registration only to have this investment thrown away to never ride again because of the rampant bicycle theft problem in Oahu. No lock will stop a thief who thinks he or she will get away unscathed. However the smallest lock will stop a thief it he or she is under the impression that his/her action will likely result in heavy consequences.

For meeting, we are free most evenings and weekends (Sunday preferably) as well.

Would you guys also include Val our newest participant on these emails?  finla...@gmail.com  Her bicycle was taken recently and she is willing to put in a little time towards helping with the cause.

Thanks for everyone's input. We feel so fortunate to have access to this beautiful island full of involved cyclists even if we have to carry a 5 pound chain...lol.

S&S




Milner, Yamato

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Mar 13, 2015, 10:23:25 PM3/13/15
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Correction to % change

 

Year

Stolen

Value

Yearly % change

2008

522

 $     186,322

N/A

2009

828

 $     377,284

59%

2010

860

 $     364,409

4%

2011

1,077

 $     453,195

25%

2012

1,101

 $     443,736

2%

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 year change

111%

 

 

 

 

Yamato Milner

(808)768-8312


Edward Huls

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Mar 14, 2015, 1:01:25 AM3/14/15
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Soha & Sentwali~

I just knew that once I was able to kick your guys' collective butts and get you to an MACB meeting, that you would embrace it, the group, and the bicycle movement in Honolulu !

And this apparently has happened, big time.  Both of you are young, intelligent, ambitious, and passionate bicycle advocates/anarchists.  I too, am all these things (ceptin' for the "young part" ~ but then again, age is only a number).  You came to your first MACB meeting on Tuesday and sat there patiently, quietly, intently, until I introduced you to the group.   And then it was as tho' I had opened-up Pandora's Box, unleashed a mighty force, yet in the best way.

Your energy, drive, commitment, and ideas are just what this committee needs ~ new blood!  And holy cow, look what you've already created is less than 3 days: a new "sub-committee" on the prevention of theft, discussion, interest, and conversation about it, as well all the off-shoots/outriggers that it is generating,  

Like myself, you are both researchers (as evidenced by your Internet links and videos), as well as being thorough "formulators".  You bring a lot to the table.  You are definitely "not" all talk and no walk ~ you walk the talk, or should we say "bike the talk".

You've already got some key-players on board with you including Yamato Milner, Daniel Alexander, Asia Yeary, myself, the two new kids on the block: > my young friend with endless ideas, Nicholas Carlomany
> Colin Leath ~ Colin: have you been told before that you resemble the very impressive British actor, Paul Bettany/"A Knight's Tale", "A Beautiful Mind", "The DaVinci Code", "Wimbledon', and a host of other great films? ~ I'm sure you have.
> and I think you also have on board, the "Papa Bear" of the MACB, Chris Sayers, one of the hardest-working bicycle advocates I've met thus far (20 years on this committee!)
> there is one other, who sat behind me and introduced himself at meeting's end ~ all I got was "Scott", a public health facilitator from Nevada who is filled with outstanding thoughts and ideas as this is "not his first rodeo"!  Scott has been down this road several times before, initiating much bicycle reform in the cities in which he's lived, most recently Reno, Nevada.  Scott created the "Bicycle APP" that is on his mobile device (just like what you guys are suggesting) ~ that once you click on it, you've got everything that you guys are talking about: from a "chat-line" to which one can immediately go and report that one's bike has just been stolen, the location of the theft, and contact info;  as well as maps, bike routes, upcoming bicycle events, et al !!  See if you can align yourselves with Scott ~ he's way cool and ready to go (Scott also has the coolest "Surly" road bike).
Some bullets;
> Daniel Alexander is a very committed bicyclist and bicycle advocate who has strategically placed himself in the super pro-active "HBL-Hawaii Bicycle League".  Daniel is offering-up HBL offices as your meeting place.  It's centrally located in Kaimuki and I suggest that you jump at his offering. 
> Daniel has also offered-up your new sub-commitee name: MACB's "Bike Theft Reduction Team" (BTRT).  Sounds good to me.
> I strongly encourage you to join HBL if you've not already.
> Colin Leath has some great ideas and it appears that he has already acted on some of them by securing some "domain names" and Email addresses.  Unfortunately, actually fortunately for Colin, he has the "wanderlust", "nomadic", "on the road" spirit about him and says that he's "just passing thru" ~ let's get him whilst we can.

I'm in agreement with just about all that you suggest including a separate "BTRT", in conjunction with the HPD, to clamp-down on bicycle theft in Honolulu.
> "Money doesn't talk, it stands-up and swears at you".  Once someone has their own bicycle stolen, they have more concern for what you guys are proposing.  Once the City, and State government(s) see that we are presenting them with additional "streams of income", they're gonna' be all about us and our referendums.
> DEFINITELY: "No lock will stop a thief who thinks he or she will get away unscathed. However the smallest lock will stop a thief if he or she is under the impression that his/her action will likely result in heavy consequences".
> A lock, any lock, is better than no lock.  But if one invests $500 - $1200 into a new bicycle, then also invest into a solid lock.  In your "Gone in 60 Seconds", I think it recommends a % formula:  that the cost of your new lock to be at least 10%-20% (?) of the cost of your bike.
> do your "4-point survey" and yes do it "paperless"/ electronically ~ "Save a Tree, save the Planet"
> Yamato is  a very good scribe, researcher, and "bean-counter".  It's a tough job but someone has to do it : ^ )  Kudos to you Yamato, on your "Bicycle Thefts in Honolulu" chart along with total #, value, and % change over the past several years.
> statistics like these will drive the concern over bicycle theft in Honolulu even higher, whilst the # of bikes stolen lower and lower.
> yes, everything is driven by "money" including what we are attempting to accomplish  Both of you have some great energy along with great ideas.  The U.S. Army is probably not paying you all that much.  Much of the work you are about to take on will be "voluntarily" and this is to be admired.  You guys are passionate about bicycling as am I and all those who are members on both the MACB and the HBL.  So pick-up an "additional stream of income" by setting-up the "Bike APP", as was suggested to you.  And this new fellow Scott can be an ally on this "outrigger" project/concept.

All of us have the same vision I am certain:
Safer bicycling in Honolulu (and throughout Hawaii) by creating an "uninterrupted" network of safe, continuous bike-ways.  By accomplishing this, more and more people will begin bicycling to and from work (if their work-place is within 3-5 miles of their homes) as well as to the supermarket et al. 

My personal goal, with my "Mo'PoB - More People on Bikes", and my affiliation with the MACB, has been to make it safer and more inviting for more people to realize that the bicycle is an awesome invention from the 19th century, that has the ability to help resolve 21st century issues:
> helping to lessen the # of cars (and trucks) on the road
> helping to lessen the poisoning of our air and atmosphere
> lessening the dependency on oil and fossil fuel
> improving the health of everyone's mind, body, and Spirit by getting "exercise" on a daily basis; as it was in earlier times.
> returning to more of a "neighborhood" and  "provincial" feeling by getting more people out of their cars and onto bicycles.  I see bicyclists acknowledging and waving to one another all day long.  Yet motorists with their windows rolled-up, A/C blasting, and radio playing are isolated from one another.  The only real time that they interact, "connect", is when they piss one another off, road-rage ensues, which sometimes leads to a confrontation outside of their metal capsules/mobile cubicles!!

So go for it ~ you've created a wonderful platform from which to launch your message. Now, what are you going to do with it?...

Cheers,
~Edward~
Mo-PoB - More People on Bikes ~ "for a Healthier Planet and Healthier People"

Edward Huls
Hawaii Fun Promotions


perfectpa...@gmail.com

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Mar 14, 2015, 7:27:34 PM3/14/15
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Good afternoon BTRT,

We're so very grateful to you Edward for your consistent reminders of this important vital organism to all things cycling in Oahu called MACB! We feel at home among so many passionate riders...it's awesome. :) Plus getting to throw around and possibly implement some positive ideas with MACB / BTRT on this amazing island...it's the good life. 

Thank you Daniel for offering the HBL office!!!  Lets shoot to meet this upcoming week at the HBL office at 3442 Waialae.  Three possible dates for us would be either Wednesday March 18th from 6:30pm - 8:00pm, Friday March 20th from 6:30pm-8:00pm or Sunday March 22nd 6:30pm-8:00pm.  Let us know what day and time is best for you and we will make it happen.

Yamato, thanks for that chart on theft rates yearly. This chart certainly points to the reality that bicycle theft is on the rise and continuing to trend in that direction. These numbers seem to indicate that either bicycle theft is likely very profitable and that thieves are becoming better at it, or that our law enforcement is becoming less effective. Or maybe both.As Sentwali reminded me, in some equations...there is a constant which if changed..can change the out come tremendously.The constant in this situation is the registration system which hasn't changed. 

Thanks to Colin, I did a little research on the San Francisco Bait Bike Program and it has reduced theft by 20%.  This is a good start but Sentwali and I think it makes the most sense for every registered bike on the road to have the GPS device if they are willing to pay for it during registration and some how have it linked to a cell phone or linked to HPD when stolen.  In the news clip San Francisco used the Bait Bike stickers, "AM I A Bait Bike?," to be an additional deterrent for theft but maybe also shoot to have every bike be a REAL Bait Bike or something similar as an option for people who may not want to dish out the extra registration fees. Either way, it should be a topic of ways to improve the registration process as it relates to theft. 


This is working but we could do better!!!

If anyone is interested in doing research on affordable and effective GPS system for bikes, Sentwali and I feel strongly it could be a huge source of revenue for the state while improving the over all bike community by giving incentives to the cyclists to invest in a GPS with their registration. 

Down the line, thinking of other ways to motivate people to cycle more, I also think Colin made a great point to include incentives for cyclists to get the GPS system by getting paid for miles they ride because it contributes to clean transit, public and personal health, etc.  Hawaii residents need to get healthier and as we all know, cycling is an effective way to do this! Some states i believe give tax breaks for the amount of miles ridden per year on state taxes??? Again, something to think about for the future.

I think Sentwali is right that we can tie in deterring theft with the state's #1 goal of increasing cyclists and by linking the two ideas in our proposal for next months meeting would be a positive way to accomplish this!

Thank you everyone for sharing your ideas and dedicating your time to this important cause!  Feel free to invite others people who are passionate about this subject to the meeting next week.  Lets shoot to secure the exact day and time by the end of this weekend so we can spread the word.

Can we have a volunteer who would be willing to act as a secretary to track the meeting?

Looking forward to seeing everyone next week.  

In health,

Soha and Sentwali

Colin Leath

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Mar 14, 2015, 8:00:17 PM3/14/15
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I vote for Friday March 20th. . .

OR meet Sunday the 22nd at 5 in Thomas Square when Occupy HNL / food not bombs is going on. Which could be more central for most people than HBL.

I really think there are two issues here that should be separated:
  1. The bike tax. That is what it is called by the city in their info pamphlet.
  2. Bike registration and theft prevention.
I found it interesting that bikes are shipped off island to be sold!

Here's one thing that could drive bike theft:
Police raid homeless camps: they take bicycles that are not registered (the main time they seize bikes?). So perhaps they need bikes again and perhaps some homeless people steal more? Then the police ship all the bikes off the island to be sold instead of having a local auction? One is supposed to have a mailing address to register a bike. Can a homeless person even register a bike if they wanted under this current system?

If for some reason taxing bikes is believed to encourage bicycling (. . .),
perhaps do it only at point of sale and by percentage of the bike's cost.


Who benefits from the bike tax?

HBL could have a conflict of interest here as I believe some of their funding comes from this tax.
What percentage of HBL funding comes from the bike tax?
Can we help them develop other sources to make up for the funds lost if the tax is removed? (To gain their support for ending the tax.)

In my proposal I would recommend
  1. the end to bike registration fees.
  2. standardization on an established, free bike registration platform, such as bikeindex.org

Then the main job left for public officials to do is to get existing registrations into the new system.
  • The system is already there and can be used by anyone with internet access.
  • No need to go to some service center somewhere, have a mailing address, and so on.
  • No need to pay a tax.
Then the only relationship we need to finesse is the one involving the police. If citizens want to gps track their bikes, they can pay for that without getting the city involved. Then call 911 when their bike is located.


S&S: if you want some inspiration for a bike theft/registration survey--
http://tram.mcgill.ca/Research/Publications/Cycling_theft.pdf  which I found from looking up "montreal bike theft"
I also searched around for various "best practices"  and other city approaches.  Copenhagen, Netherlands, Vancouver, etc.

I can also point you to a guy with connections to the bike theft scene. Not sure how talkative he'd be though. He's in the tent furthest makai (in the middle) on magic island. I'm forgetting his name now though.


Lastly, I'll say there is one unrelated thing that could help bike culture here aside from an end to the bike tax and being able to ride both ways along/near the beach in Waikiki. . .

A bike collective for adults that is not university-affiliated.

I got to looking at Atlanta, and found they have at least three bike collectives, one university-affiliated.
http://sopobikes.org/ is one.
And they're organizing  a Bike!Bike! conference at the end of march.

Bike!Bike! is an international annual gathering organized by and for community bicycle projects. The conference is a space for participants from shops and related advocacy groups to converge in a different city each year over a 4 day period to have workshops and strengthen our social network.


But that is another topic. . .

See you soon,
Colin



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Milner, Yamato

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S&S,

 

I prefer Sunday as I am not available Wednesday or Friday evening this week. Also, is there any chance that you are available earlier in the day?

 

http://doodle.com/ is one way to schedule large group meetings.

 

 

 

Yamato Milner

(808)768-8312


 

Good afternoon BTRT,

Daniel Alexander

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Mar 16, 2015, 9:13:41 PM3/16/15
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Hey BTR team, 
I took the liberty of putting together a doodle, with hopes that we can meet Sunday or Monday. I'm certainly open to other time, in order to allow everyone that wants to participate to be there. http://doodle.com/877pxsgm6qbhmvy6

I think all the stuff Yamato has provided will allow us to provide a convincing argument on why action is needed. The bit on 20% reduction in theft associated with the bait bike program in SF also makes for pretty convincing argument. Collin, you mentioned best practice from various international cities, it would be great if you could share these, particularly ones that talk about solutions (in terms of the Montreal study, I'm not seeing too much in the way of solutions in it, just problem identification). I did some brief searching for something like a bike theft reduction plan (essentially what we're coming up with), but I couldn't find anything good. If anyone has such a document, I think that would be most useful. 

As a general comment, I would urge that we consider the full range of measures to address bicycle theft, particularly that we give due attention to bike parking and education. 

Thanks,
Daniel 

Milner, Yamato

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Mar 16, 2015, 10:53:35 PM3/16/15
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Working off of the survey that S&S proposed, I’ve gone ahead and made a survey monkey. The questions gather information on how many people do NOT contact the police when their bicycle is stolen. Please look it over and provide comments at our next meeting. Please wait to share this link with others. I want to make sure everyone is happy with the wording and the purpose of the survey before people start using it. https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MKTP6M9

 

I think we can get a lot of feedback from an online survey if it goes viral amongst the bicycling community on Oahu. As S&S mentioned, we could also ask bicycle shops to keep survey sheets at their shop for a few weeks if we think there is a segment of the population that would not know about the online version.

 

 

Colin,

 

The bicycle “tax” you’re referring is the bicycle/moped registration fee. It’s a one-time $15 fee as mentioned earlier. Once you register your bike, you get a yellow sticker to put on the frame and it has a serial number.

 

The bicycle/moped registration fee or “tax” gets put into a bicycle fund. This fund pays for things that are bicycle related with one of the major expenditures being the Bike Ed grant which is awarded to HBL on a yearly basis. Learn more about HBL’s Bike Ed program here: http://www.hbl.org/bikeed  Although it may take some time, I can find out the details of the bike fund expenditures if that’s something you’d like to know.

 

 

 

 

Yamato Milner

(808)768-8312


From: Colin Leath [mailto:colin...@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, March 14, 2015 2:00 PM
To: Yin Yang
Cc: end-bike-t...@googlegroups.com; ni...@soundshala.com; dan...@hbl.org; Maaza Mekuria; Asia Yeary; Scott Hall; Milner, Yamato; Edward Hulls; finla...@gmail.com
Subject: Re: bike theft reduction

 

I vote for Friday March 20th. . .

Colin Leath

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Mar 17, 2015, 7:10:02 PM3/17/15
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Yamato,
you might consider asking in the survey whether people registered their bike and why or why not,
instead of just encouraging them to do so at the end.

Daniel, I haven't found any best practices guides for reducing bike theft. . . I did attend a "pedalafest" in Zagreb last June and there was a panel discussion on the topic which I didn't go to and haven't been able to get a video of it or a response from the guy from the Netherlands who was on it--  see the schedule for June 6-http://pedalafest.eu/en/ . I'll try another person.

I haven't been surveying people with a questionnaire, but I have been talking to people I meet.

I did take the time to register my bike with bikeindex.org :

https://bikeindex.org/bikes/41102/

You can print a spokecard with a QR code linking to the bike's page this way:
https://bikeindex.org/bikes/41102/spokecard

The main contribution I think I have to make to this group is the following suggestion:
  • Bike registration should be free and not compulsory.

As it is bike registration is ignored by many people. (just look around and ask for examples. . . It seems to me there must be at least one or two stores not complying with the registration law-- or people are getting their bikes here in other ways).

Some people do not register because they have no desire to deal with the city bureaucracy. (a man I spoke to this morning just said he kept the contact info of the person he bought it from. So far he's not been hassled by cops. He does not appear to be homeless. He complained about other issues he'd had trying to pay a city parking ticket as a reason he has no desire to try to submit the bike registration paperwork. I told him about bikeindex.org.)

The compulsory part of bike registration is used by cops to harass people they think are homeless, particularly in waikiki.

As a result, people who could benefit from being able to use bikes do not in order to avoid hassling from the police.

One man I spoke to uses a kick scooter instead both to address the theft issue (he can carry it with him everywhere) and the registration issue (he found an unregistered bike in the past left by a tourist he believed and got a ticket  when riding it--yes it is possible to find good abandoned bikes that are unregistered in honolulu-- I've found two right around the beginning of last month, one was unregistered, and gave both to cycle manoa). Unfortunately for him the cops also won't let him ride it on the road or on the walkway out diamond head road (he camps in kahala). So not only does he not ride a bike, but he now walks diamond head road. . . He says, "hawaii's different. It's like communism here" (he's from albania.)


Well, I'm out of time here--


The odd thing is-- if you stole a registered  bike with a sticker, you'd not be hassled!!


Until next time,

Colin



YinYang

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Mar 17, 2015, 10:23:02 PM3/17/15
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Aloha BRT

Sentwali and I found a central location as an option to meet this Sunday.  It is called Fresh Cafe and it is at 831 Queen St.  How does 3pm on Sunday, March 22nd, work for everyone?  There is wifi, plenty of parking and tons of outside picnic tables...

In health,

S & S

Milner, Yamato

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Mar 18, 2015, 1:35:24 PM3/18/15
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Works for me.

 

Yamato Milner

(808)768-8312


Colin Leath

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Mar 18, 2015, 8:17:58 PM3/18/15
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Colin Leath

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Mar 19, 2015, 4:11:58 PM3/19/15
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Following Daniel's example,
I made a doodle to see who might attend the meeting at Fresh Cafe on Sunday--
https://doodle.com/ivhrmiren8gyqhn884sfx2p4/ 
(perhaps go there and show you can make it or make a comment about what would be better)

For reference, the one Daniel set up is at:http://doodle.com/877pxsgm6qbhmv

(If we don't have a time/place Daniel can make it to we should probably try something different.)

Also, Below I've pasted a link to an event about submitting testimony on bills. I'm planning to be there partly because Chris Lee will be there (pro-bicycling, and perhaps could support any legislation we might need help with).


Yamato:

Is is possible to get information on where the bicycle registration fee/bike tax money is going, as you said you might be able to figure out?

Can we also figure out:
  • How much it costs to store and ship to the mainland all the impounded bicycles. (Do all the islands ship them away this or is it just Oahu?)
  • How much money is made in the auctions. And where that money goes.
  • How much it might cost to run the bike registration part of the customer service center.
Basically, I'd like to, if possible, be able to make a report showing the costs and expenditures of the current registration system along with costs and expenditures and income of the current bike impoundment practices.

In a half-formed vision I have:
Imagine if the bicycle impoundment warehouse could be run in tandem with a community bike collective. Instead of shipping unclaimed and unidentified bikes off the islands, they could be used to fund/support a community bike project. Think Goodwill for bicycles.

----------------------
Regarding who would resist a change in the registration system: the police and the DOT? The police would lose a hammer that they can hold over the head of people and their bikes (but they can still write tickets for breaking the laws as in every other state in the US). And the DOT might lose some data.


Here's some more background that came from searching for "hawaii bicycle registration":



Here's a story from one of those links:

Honolulu has a mandatory bike registration.

Used to cost $8 every 2 years, but since no one reregistered, they changed it to $15 for the bike life. The late fee for registration after a sale is an extra $20.

The city forces LBS to collect the money and send in the registration forms.

I have not heard of anyone getting their stolen bike back as a result of the registration.

The money is suppose to go to bike only things "the City Bike Fund". It does provide some of the funding for the Hawaii Bicycle League BikeEd Program. But much of the BikeEd funding still comes from donations, HBL membership dues and bicycle events.

Many years ago, a few million dollars (I seem to remember either 2 or 5 million) went missing from "the City Bike Fund". That missing money was never returned to the "Bike Fund".

The Honolulu Police Bike Patrol has set up "bike road blocks" for the express purpose of confiscating unregistered bikes.

In 2006, a military spouse, who cycled to work, got hit by a car. Her bicycle was damaged and she wanted a police report. She had problems getting Honolulu Police to respond to what they considered an insignificant accident. Since she was fairly new to the island and brought her bike from out of state, she was unaware of the bike registration (note - no other county in Hawaii registers bikes). The police finally show up and rather than simply telling the woman she needed to register her bike, the police confiscated it. No ticket was given to the motorist which caused the collision. GOOD JOB HONOLULU POLICE, WAY TO MISTREAT OUR MILITARY FAMILIES AND CYCLIST.

I bought a hand built recumbent from Eugene, OR. It did not have a serial number stamped on it and none was required by law. When I tried to register it, the Honolulu City clerk insisted that the OR builder had to comply with Honolulu law and he refused to register the bike. After much discussion, the clerk finally admitted that an OR builder did not have to follow Honolulu laws, but he still refused to register the bike. I finally DEMANDED that the clerk give me a signed letter acknowledging that he refused to register the bike. Finally the clerk decided to get on the phone and then came back and said he would register the bike (as opposed to writing the letter), BUT HE INSISTED THAT I HAD TO PUT SOMETHING IN THE SERIAL NUMBER BLANK ON THE FORM. The bike was built by HPM (Human Powered Machines), so I just wrote HPM down as the serial number.

The times I have called the police for a collision or for being run off the road, the first thing they were interested in, was if the bike was registered (even though they had my ID card in hand).

Other than BikeEd, little to none of the money has gone to projects that have actually provided safe cycling facilities.

Hopefully, the big yellow decal on my bike will at least get a bike thief to steal the bike next to mine, rather than mine.
--------------------------------------------

Also  the police apparently confiscated bikes during a critical mass bike ride several years ago-- one that was perhaps the last critical mass ride. My informant says the mainlanders rode in an aggressive /provocative way while the locals did not. That annoyed the cops and they took unregistered bikes.  Hmm I'm out of time but this looks like interesting reading:
https://www.google.com/search?q=hawaii+critical+mass+bicycle+ride

---------------------

Civics IS Sexy Part Deux & Legislative Updates

 

Note: THIS IS A LONG EMAIL WITH LOTS OF INFO ON BILLS, DON’T BE OVERWHELMED, PLEASE READ THE FIRST COUPLE PARAGRAPHS, REGISTER FOR OUR NEXT WORKSHOP AND USE THE REST TO REFERENCE!

 

Aloha Civics IS Sexy team…

 

We have made it about halfway through the 2015 legislative session with many bills still moving forward. Its been a busy start to the year as Surfrider and many of our friends and allies have spent a lot of time in committee rooms at the Capitol standing up for a world that they believe in. Thank you all for your support, dedication, and time spent writing testimony and speaking in person. You can find below bills that are still moving forward.

 

A very big applause for our two youngest workshop attendees from Mililani High School, Nicole Antos & Samantha Alvarado, who have both been at the Capitol testifying in person on the bills they are connected to. It is amazing to see them inspiring a new generation of civic engagement and we can all learn from their enthusiasm and courage.

 

We are going to have a more informal follow up workshop refresher and testimony writing session at the Protohub Honolulu (458 Keawe St – Kakaako) next Monday, March 23rd from 6:30-8:00 PM. This is part of an effort from our Energy Hui (see attached word doc). You can find details and RSVP for the event here

·      Potluck Style

·      Representative Chris Lee will join us again for updates and advice

·      Get a refresher on the Capitol website

 

 

Remember these Steps:

Step1: Use your power to participate in our government by voicing your opinion to our state law makers.

·      Create an account on http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/

·       Use the register link on the top right of page to accomplish this.

·      Submit testimony on individual bills (you can follow bills using the “hearing notification” button in the center of the page – please add the bills listed below.

·      Search for specific bills using the boxes on the left of the page.

·      Make sure to include your zip code and address in testimony so that legislatures know who is testifying from their districts. The support of their constituents is very important in their decisions.

·       Know who your representatives and senators are and contact them directly on issues that are meaningful to you – you can search for your legislatures using the function on the top right of the page by typing in your street name and zip.

 

Step 2: Follow along with the bills of interest using the information that follows with links and descriptions to the bills. There is also a series of notes in the bullet points underneath each bill name which reflects discussions at our meetings that attempt to break the bills down to something closer to English language.


Colin Leath

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Mar 19, 2015, 4:14:05 PM3/19/15
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Is the correct link for the fresh cafe sunday meeting time-- sorry about that.

YinYang

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Mar 19, 2015, 5:20:19 PM3/19/15
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So, another person to add to the list of cyclists interested in contributing to the decrease of theft in Honolulu. Welcome Tim. His email, lamber...@yahoo.com. He's looking to replace a stolen bike for a disabled person.

Soha and I are open to meeting either at HBL office (3442 Waialae Ave., 2nd Floor)  or Queen Street Fresh Café Sunday and have indicated this on both surveys. We're flexible so it's my thought that  which ever one is more convenient for the most people is the obvious choice.

So to be clear
Our thoughts of things on the table to be discussed at this meeting are....(please add to this list other topics under the umbrella of a proposal.)

1.Work on a narrowing down a few proposals to one relating to Oahu reduction of bicycle theft to submit to the MACB
     A. Discuss what we need to make this proposal more likely to get sent up the chain
     B. Discuss ideas as to how to get data to support our proposal
     C. Discuss the registration process and ways to follow the money trail so as to again tie this into A.
     D. Ideas on how to improve the registration process and how to then include solid ideas into the proposal
     E. Possible ways to make our proposal lucrative for the city, while at the same time increasing bicycle usage in Oahu
     F. Discuss if and how improving the recovery rate of bicycles may make HPD's job simpler requiring less man hours...and back to E.
     G.Thoughts on if in fact it benefits the city financially for more people to drive cars (registration, insurance, parking tickets, moving violations, etc) or if it's in Oahu's interest to reduce theft making bicycling (which supports and increase in the health of riders, and the health of our environment).
     H. Discuss if we should tie bicycle theft into Objective 1 of the Oahu Bike Plan which is to increase the number of people who ride bicycles in our state. http://www.honolulu.gov/bicycle/oahubikeplan.html

Just to be clear, this is a collective effort. No hierarchy...just a cooperative collective group of cyclists interested in making real changes related to bicycle theft in Oahu and making cycling the number one choice for commuters in Oahu..by making it safer and more convenient for folks to get out and ride. So, the more ideas and participation, the better.

See you out on the streets BRTC (bicycle reduction theft committee). :)
S&S


Maaza Mekuria

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Mar 19, 2015, 7:12:42 PM3/19/15
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I heard that Advocates such as HBL get proceeds from registration.   Perhaps Yamato would be able to find the whole truth. 

I would also be careful not to make the already worried and wary public and bike community saddled  with more police state type enforcement.

We have to encourage responsibility with the freedom we enjoy.  I have hard time with having to not ride the side walk when I feel unsafe.

I accept that restriction but  we have laws almost for everything and it has not made us safe or nice , only fearful of consequences.

What a slippery slope?

YinYang

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Aloha Maaza

I so agree with this. "I would also be careful not to make the already worried and wary public and bike community saddled  with more police state type enforcement."


Edward Huls

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Mar 20, 2015, 12:49:40 AM3/20/15
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Fellow BRTC - Bicycle Reduction Theft Committee members (way cool sub-committee name don'tcha' think? ~ right-on Daniel):

I was under the impression that all of downtown Honolulu totally shut-down on Sundays and so I called the "Fresh Cafe" to check their hours ~ and son-of-a-gun, the young woman, Cassandra, told me that they are open on Sundays, just that they close their doors an hour earlier, at 7:00 p.m:

".....a central location as an option to meet this Sunday.  It is called Fresh Cafe and it is at 831 Queen St.  How does 3pm on Sunday, March 22nd, work for everyone?  There is wifi, plenty of parking and tons of outside picnic tables..."

http://www.freshcafehi.com/#about

So either location, Fresh Cafe or else HBL's offices on Waialae Ave,, Kaimuki is good with me.  What about all of you?

And does 3:00 work for everyone?...

Maaza:
> if HBL picks-up some additional kala, $$, from bicycle registration, then hey, they're doing good work so let 'em
> and yeh, no need  "to make the already worried and wary public and bike community saddled with more police state type enforcement"...
> if whenever you're feeling "unsafe" during your bicycling around Honolulu, due to whatever reason (heavy motor-traffic, "rush hour", an excessive number of crazy-ass, unconscious motorists on the streets & highways), then have no hesitancy in jumping up onto the "safer" sidewalk with just three(3) stipulations:
1) slow down and acquiesce to pedestrians
2) don't ride on the sidewalks once you're in Waikiki (they'll cite you and throw your ass in jail)
3) if you don't have already, get yourself a bell for your handlebars and ring the shit out of it whenever coming-up behind pedestrians who are clueless to your presence behind them ~ all bicyclists should have a bell on their handle-bar...

Cheers,
~Edward~
Mo'MoB - More People on Bikes

Edward Huls
Hawaii Fun Promotions

Daniel Alexander

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Hey BRTC, 
It looks like Sunday is a good day for those that have completed the doodle polls. So let's go with the Sunday 3pm at Fresh Cafe in Kakaako. 

See you there. 
-Daniel 

Patrick Kelly

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Hello all,

Daniel emailed me about this group, but I was late to the party. I wrote a blog post with my views on how to address bicycle theft in Hawaii, and would like to share it.


There are other issues, secondary I think, like locking, safe locations to lock, general education, but I believe the approach I've sketched is the only way to seriously reduce bicycle theft. And I believe that in Hawaii we actually could succeed.

Edward Huls

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Patrick~

Your "blog'" and its content, with your own approach to curbing bicycle theft in Honolulu, is well thought-out and on point.  This is positive, pro-active shit and it is welcomed and well-received.   It would have been great if you had attended our sub-committee BTPT meeting at the "Fresh Cafe" and voiced these ideas and participated in the conversation ~ a conversation that was at once, charged and pro-active.  We covered a lot of ground and came up with some really good shit.   But unfortunately, you were "late for the party" ?!

I, we, had put out the message that this subcommittee meeting would be held Sunday afternoon, with its time and location, to over 200 bicyclists and bicycle advocates. SEVEN(7) people showed-up !!  This has been the type of apathetic, lack-lustre, laid-back Hawaiian-style I've had to deal with since I came to the Islands back in the 70's.

To my new friend, the very vocal and opinionated "engineer", Maazda, where were you?  I guess that until you've had your bike stolen, you've had 2 or 3 bikes stolen, that you really don't get motivated to change things up a bit.  Isn't this the unfortunate way of the world ~ that it takes injustice, bigotry, human rights challenged, and criminal acts to get people motivated to initiate change...

For you "Magnificent Seven" who were in attendance, my hat's off to you...

Cheers,
~Edward~
Mo'PoB - More People on Bikes

Edward Huls
Hawaii Fun Promotions

Patrick Kelly

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Yes, I'm sorry I missed the meeting. I'm in San Francisco for work
this week. I was late for the party in that I thought the meeting was
going to be on Monday, and I put off writing up my thoughts until
Sunday night. That's when I discovered that the meeting had already
been held. I was intending to post before the meeting. If I had been
home, I would have been at that meeting.
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Cathleen Matsushima

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Please remove me from this email list.

Mahalo,

Cate

c...@hawaii.edu

 

From: Edward Huls [mailto:hawaiifun...@gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, March 23, 2015 5:49 AM
To: Patrick Kelly
Cc: Nicholas Carlomany; Maaza Mekuria; Asia Yeary; Scott Hall; Yamato Milner; Edward Huls; end-bike-t...@googlegroups.com; Ann Peterson; Ann Sakuma; Chad Taniguchi; Heidi Hansen-Smith; Janice Marsters; John Goody (E-mail); Pattie Dunn; Rich Sullivan (E-mail); Tom Fee; Wayson Kobelansky; Aaron Landry; Adam Lampley; Alan Fujimori; Ambika Castle; Anela Lani Grace; Anjali Puri; Anna Leonardo; Aydee Zielke; Ben Madden; Ben Treveino; Benjamin Trevino; BobMon; Brendan Blume; Brendon Hanna; Brian Canevari; byk project; Carla Buscaglia; Caterine Picardo; Cathleen Matsushima; Chad Taniguchi; Chris Blumenstetter; Chris Dowling; Chris Ponsar; Christine Burton; Cora Speck; Crysttal Atkins; Dale Hoffmann; Dana Arakawa; Daniel Alexander; Daniel Alexander; Daniel Alexander; David Aquino; David Cheever; David Hitzl; David Nash; Denise DeJoseph; Doorae Shin; Doug Fetterly; Edward Cox; Elizabeth Fischer; Elliot Van Wie; Espiau, Renee; Flora Ling; Frank Kimitch; Gwen Sinclair; Harold Ebeling; Jared Washkowitz; Jason Perreira; Jason Smith; Jennifer Milam; Jeri El-Swaify; Jim Darlow; John Climaldi; John Henderson; Justine Espiritu; Kari Benes; Katie Richards; Keola Childs; Kevin Kinvig; Lani Michael; Leif Kohler; Linda Sjogren; Lori McCarney; Maaza Mekuria; Maggie McCain; Mark Takamura; Michael Hays; Michael Laughlin; Michael Rivera; Michelle Simmons; Nalani Aki; Nancy Miller; Natalie Iwasa; Nick Blank; Nicole Daoang; Nicole Hori; Nikki Love; Patricia Johnson; Rachel Pfeffer; Ray Tabata; Riki Nakamoto; RJ Martin; Robert Belgred; Robert Salloom; Robyn Petterson; Rudy Lopez; Sarah Shelton; Sau Hsu; Senator Espero; Shane Neal; Shoko Paul; Susan Anderson; Suzanne Westerly; Tara Lucas; Tony Hall; Troy Vickrey; Velasco, Nicole; Vincent Ricafort; William Higgins; Yamato Milner; Yuhei Miyake; Yuko Chiba; William Harrison; Yin Yang; Mayor Kirk Caldwell; Mike Formby
Subject: Re: bike theft reduction

 

Patrick~

Yin Yang

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Aloha Patrick

Thanks for your input, it's greatly appreciated.

You mentioned...The only way to stop theft is to stop buying stolen bicycles.


Here we have an “only way” type of solution. In my opinion, this is like saying there is only one way to get from the Fedex at the corner of King and University to Hanauma Bay. Just as the island is full of side streets, trails, side walks and distractions….theft in any city is never a one solution fixes theft. Someone may come along and suggest cutting off the hand of a thief is the only way to stop theft.....it certainly will curtail it, but if someone is desperate enough, they'll use the hand which has not been cut off... ;)


For example, let's say we go solely with the get people to stop buying stolen bicycles theory. This is like saying if you want people to lose weight, get them to exercise. It comes down to available resources, convenience and lack of discipline for many people. People with limited resources, will buy a bicycle that is inexpensive no matter what laws are in place just as there will always be people who find ways to inexpensively purchase illegal substances like cocain, marijuana etc. The reason western medicine has failed so dismally to adequately help Americans get well is because it approaches health from a unidimentional standpoint as it relates to tackling problems in the body as opposed to looking at it from many angles. As such, I'd suggest we find a few effective ways to deal with bicycle theft in Oahu. A thief who has three doors to choose from...will more than likely choose the one which gives him or her the least amount of challenges.

This theory also assumes that the only people profiting from stolen bicycles are the petty thieves. This ties me into the next hole in your theory.


You wrote “



  1. Stolen bicycles do not cross state lines

This is simply not true. People can easily sell frames on ebay. It's very easy to disassemble a bicycle and sell the parts for many times more than the original value of the bicycle. In addition to this, unrecovered bicycles are thrown on a ship and sent to the mainland for sales amounting to a significant amount of yen going into someone's pocket. 

Finally, I do personally believe in taking responsibility myself...however, this is America where it's very difficult to get our citizens to take an initiative for things until they absolutely have to. Please take some time to look around you. Over half of our population is fat sick and dying. Kids are acquiring diabetes at the age of 12 yrs as a result of their parents not taking personal responsibility for the health of their families...among many other reasons. People in general who are not disciplined as it relates to putting down that 3rd beer and 6th slice of pizza will most certainly be hard to sell on taking personal responsibility in the area of not buying a stolen bicycle. This is why microwaves and fast food are without equal...because of their convenience and how easy they make things.

All of this to say...I agree that your approach can be effective to a certain extent, however it is part of the solution, not the “only” solution. Maybe we can implement this under our education part of our proposal. Would you be willing to contribute your thoughts on ways and venues where we can educate the public on prevention of theft through not buying stolen bicycles..and also propose a feasible plan for a system that would place the serial number of a cyclist in some type of software which optional an is easily accessible to the public?

Thanks again for your thoughts

Sentwali


On Thursday, March 12, 2015 at 5:57:19 PM UTC-10, Colin Leath wrote:
Looking ahead to the next MACB meeting,

We're supposed to have our proposal in by April 7. A week before the meeting.

If we do meet in person about this, it could be some time between March 31 and 4/7. Or we could try to do it all online.

I recommend we each write up our own proposals as if they were the one going to be approved by the committee.

Actually, perhaps we could each write up two proposals:
  1. very close to status quo (as little effort and magic and money to implement as possible, very close to doing nothing)---
  2. pie in the sky: e.g. unlimited funding, unlimited city/state/county support. Sci fi technology (gps tracking via a nearly invisible device; unlimited drone surveillance. . . things like that), paying or otherwise rewarding people for the kind of behavior we hope to see.


We could all think about the process of how bikes could be registered, possibly tracked, and recovered if stolen.

We can try registering our bikes with bikeindex or any other site we might want to recommend that the city /state/county use. If we want to recommend a particular site in our proposal we should be able to say why. . .

We can possibly solve more issues than just theft by whatever solution we recommend (if bikes are being tracked, could people be paid for the miles they ride. . . to encourage clean transit, public health?).

Below are just some more google searches that could help inspire thoughts on this issue.

It is conceivable that technology could put an end to this problem.

I think the advent of bike sharing in the city and the infrastructure installed there could be helpful in some way.

Also:

or

just as an experiment-- (I'm always afraid of sending people emails they don't want. . . lists/communities could make it easier for people to opt in or out-- or maybe it is overkill for what we're doing now)

Perhaps we could use one. (I'm more comfortable and familiar with email lists if we have to choose one)


At any rate, I'll write up a proposal or two at some point and post it/them.



Until next time!

Colin Leath
+1 805 699 6411

Patrick Kelly

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Yup, you're right. I was over-speaking when I said "the only way". There are lots of ways to combat bicycle theft (locks, better police department support, kill all bicycle thieves, etc.) but I really want to believe that we can attack the problem by breaking the bicycle theft cycle, which AFAIK is people stealing bikes to sell them to get cash. I cannot think of any other way to truly break that cycle, except to enable/convince people to stop buying stolen bicycles.

Yes, it's also true that this approach will not stop 100% of all bicycle theft. There will always be bicycles stolen. What I'm after is the highest rate of reduction. I will not be satisfied with 20% reduction. I want 80% or 90% or better. So far, I don't see any other proposals that I think will get us that far. Maybe I'm delusional, but I think that the approach I'm pushing can easily get us over 50% reduction. (We don't really have a real way to measure that, so I'll never be proven wrong. :))

You're right again on the parting out and selling via ebay. I hadn't thought of that. I don't really know the profile of the typical bike thief we have in Hawaii, but suspect that currently very few of them are taking this route. I could be wrong. On the other hand, if my approach were "successful" it would definitely increase this use of this path to monetization. I would hope that it would become hard to sell frames, even online, since that's where the serial number is, and it would still be searchable outside Hawaii.

My talk of "the only way" was not meant to imply that I'm against other approaches. I definitely lock my bike. I think it is useful to educate people on proper locking, and I'm totally on board with getting police educated and more engaged. But I believe that effort put into education about registering and checking via a public database (ala bikeindex.org) will have the highest payoff (long term) of cutting the rate of bicycle theft.

So, in terms of actual action items...

Ideally we could gather all the stakeholders in this venture, which would begin with the bicycle community, represented by advocacy groups and this forum, I suppose, and the police dept(s) and whoever can speak for the existing registration system, and together agree on a common registration system with these features:

* open to the public for registration and checking
* usable by the police/legal enforcement
* can be used to register currently owned, and/or stolen bicycles
* easily usable by bike shops to register new bikes sold

Personally, I believe that's bikeindex.org. I also believe that it's very unlikely that we'll get everybody to agree on which service to use. Theoretically, the existing government registration system could be upgraded so that it meets these requirements, but I doubt it will happen.

Let's assume that we get mutual agreement, or at least some agreement to move forward with bikeindex.org. Next steps:

* Integrate/link bikeindex.org on the front page of hbl.org
* find/work with any/all other bicycle organizations in Hawaii
* find any/all other hawaii+bicycle online forums and integrate/link there, too
* work with all bike shops to integrate bikeindex.org into their sales process. (bikeindex has an API and integration with the most popular point of sale system used by bike shops)
* create printed materials to be distributed at every opportunity explaining how/why to use bikeindex for registering and for checking before buying.
* have some kind of bicycle security event where we get government types to talk about how we're all working together to solve this problem. the main point of this event is to get media coverage of the new paradigm.

I believe the general strategy should be to focus on educating cyclists, and expect that they will educate their friends. To be effective we need to reach as many people as possible who are buying used bikes. I assume we can do that by focusing on cyclists and getting "trickle out". 

Longer term, we have an issue of what to do about the existing registration system and law? Personally, I'm thinking we should have a law requiring registration, but that rather than having a single (currently ineffective) registration system, we should create a framework and requirements to identify a small set of recognized registrars, and legally require registration in at least one of them. The goal here would be that a police officer should be able to quickly check & confirm registration of a bicycle in suspicious circumstances.



Val Finlayson

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Mar 30, 2015, 7:57:53 PM3/30/15
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I’ve looked a little in to whether or not parts are being sold out of Hawaii. It’s a little inconclusive, but I haven’t really found much either. eBay doesn’t seem to be as much of a thing here. I think the shipping and time constraints may be a bit much for someone looking for a quick buck off of bike parts.

That said, I get the impression that a lot of the chop shops do their dealing more or less off the grid - from what I have picked up, it’s a lot of local dealing for quick cash in flea markets or by word of mouth, maybe pawn shops, transport up to the north shore, or straight up selling frames to the scrap metal dealers (several of whom blatantly advertise in the bikes sections of our local Craiglist).

Regarding registration: I do not feel strongly one way or other other about having it compulsory or voluntary. However, I think it would be best to integrate the existing system not only with itself (getting Customer Service databases to talk to HPD, etc.), but also to interface with BikeIndex. Not having a publicly accessible database in which to check serial numbers undoubtedly hampers the ability to recover stolen property. Not everyone will know (or be willing) to check with HPD when buying a used bike. Safe to say not everyone will do the same with an online index, but removing a middleman of sorts could have an advantage. It is still, however, the end user’s responsbility to report if a hit comes in on a stolen bike, and that’s a type of intertia that I don’t know how to overcome even with education efforts.

This also transitions into the education/outreach issue. This is probably the most crucial thing we can do to reduce theft. I like what HBL does with the bike education at the grade school level. It would be interesting to see if further work with the school systems can be done to follow up on the bike curriculum throughout the year. That would increase the probability of retention in the kids a little bit. Another approach is to integrate bike safety education as part of driver’s ed - both from the perspective of a driver and a cyclist. For example, the state of Michigan is just starting to integrate cyclist ed into the state driver education program requirements - I have a good friend who is working with the state there as part of a bike advocacy group and I’m sure she’d be able to give us some pointers. And not just with bike/traffic safety, laws, helmet use, strategies to label and ID your bike if you catch a thief with it - things like properly locking bikes (e.g. modified Sheldon Brown method), information you need to report thefts, maybe even free basic maintenance classes.

Another aspect generating some interesting discussion among cyclists and bike commuters online is the perception of bikes. Many of us are given bikes as kids and they’re treated as toys. Not all of us get the chance to learn about using them as true transportation, but instead have only certain places and times where we were allowed to ride them. That can color how we see bikes and other modes of transport as we get older, and perhaps in some folks that dimishes the perceived value of a bike and makes the theft issue less important in their eyes. I’m not sure how it is in Hawaii, having only lived here for a year, but in the semi-rural to rural Midwest where I grew up, bikes are rarely seen when it’s cold and are dominantly used for only recreation (blame Detroit and Flint on that, not to mention the infrastructure in many places). Changing that perception of bikes as toys through increased outreach, visibility, pollution/carbon footprint advocacy, driver education integration, what have you - that’s going to be another big step toward reducing theft.

As a quick note, the more I think about the San Fran “Am I a bait bike?” program, the more I like it. Nothing like instilling a bit of paranoia in someone who knows they’re already breaking the law. If they can’t trust the bike isn’t bugged (and at least some marked bikes would definitely have to be), they lose their peace of mind that they can get away with it.

Have a great week, folks,

Val

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University of Hawai’i at Manoa



Milner, Yamato

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Mar 30, 2015, 9:52:42 PM3/30/15
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Below are some stats on bicycle theft. We did not meet our 1999 benchmarks for 2000 and 2005 theft reduction.

Attached is a U.S. department of justice manual on bicycle theft reduction. It’s pretty comprehensive so I suggest everyone take a look at it. It can be used as a guideline for creating the local proposal.

 

 

 

Data obtained from HPD annual statistic reports

 

 

Item

Year (Jan-Dec)

Stolen

Value

 % change

 

Bicycle

1999

1456

$844,309

N/A

 

 

2000

1850

$975,973

N/A

 

 

2005

946

$329,770

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2008

522

 $     186,322

N/A

 

 

2009

828

 $     377,284

59%

 

 

2010

860

 $     364,409

4%

 

 

2011

1,077

 $     453,195

25%

 

 

2012

1,101

 $     443,736

2%

 

 

2013

1,063

-

-3%

 

 

2014

Stats not yet available

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 year % change

104%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1999 plan calls for 10% reduction (145 bikes) by 2000 and 50% (728 bikes) by 2005

 

 

% of 1999 counts

 

Actual 1999 theft coutns

1456

100%

 

2000 goal (10% reduction)

1310

-10%

 

Actual 2000 theft counts

1850

27%

 

2005 goal (50% reduction)

728

-50%

 

Actual 2005 theft counts

946

-35%

 

 

Benchmarks in the 1999 plan were not met

 

 

 

 

 

2012 plan calls for 10% reduction over 2014 levels by 2017 and 20% reduction by 2022.

Since 2014 stats are not yet available, 2013 levels are used instead to generate an estimate.

 

 

2013

1,063

 

 

2017 goal (10% reduction)

957

 

 

2020 goal (20% reduction)

850

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Bicycle Registration

 

Theft as % of new registration

 

Day of count

New

% Change

Theft

 

December 31, 2010

28,705

*

860

3%

 

December 31, 2011

32,730

114.02%

1,077

3%

 

December 31, 2012

29,872

91.27%

1,101

4%

 

December 31, 2013

30,639

102.57%

1,063

3%

 

Average

30,487

102.62%

 

 

 

 

Bicycle Theft.pdf

Val Finlayson

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Mar 30, 2015, 11:01:28 PM3/30/15
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Hi Yamato,

Interesting information. What year was the registration passed into law again?

I dug into the numbers a little more and pulled out a couple of interesting correlations (combination of waiting for a very slow lab procedure and some major writer’s block).

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PastedGraphic-7.pdf

Maaza Mekuria

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Mar 31, 2015, 12:55:27 AM3/31/15
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I agree with Patrick that if one needs to focus it should be breaking the easy market for stolen bikes. 
It looks to me also that yields the most return on the effort put to it.  Finding what are the sales outlets and closing as many loopholes as possible would be a good goal.

I am sure Colin has shared this but else where they use undercover buyers in online shops such as Craigslist to trap thieves.  But making it a culture of shame  buying stolen bikes among other bikers  and some public information about the epidemic of stolen bikes will certainly be a good strategy.

Is there a way thieves ship bikes to the mainland or other islands?   That would be useful to know as well , if it has not been discussed before. 

If the bikes cost upwards of 500 dollars it may not be much to pay 50-100  to ship them anywhere.   Any stats from the post office is helpful.

I can ask the downtown office if they will be open to share if any such activity is going on.

You all have generated good ideas and I am sure this year's stats would be different than last.

Since it is Easter holyweek for me , I bow my head in prayer for all to live responsible and honest lives and the police to be busy catching the thieves and robbers.

Yin Yang

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Mar 31, 2015, 5:46:34 PM3/31/15
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Greetings BTRT.


Patrick, I just want to make certain I'm clear on your ideas.


Patrick you mentioned here


So, in terms of actual action items...


Ideally we could gather all the stakeholders in this venture, which would begin with the bicycle community, represented by advocacy groups and this forum, I suppose, and the police dept(s) and whoever can speak for the existing registration system, and together agree on a common registration system with these features:


* open to the public for registration and checking

* usable by the police/legal enforcement

* can be used to register currently owned, and/or stolen bicycles

* easily usable by bike shops to register new bikes sold


Personally, I believe that's bikeindex.org. I also believe that it's very unlikely that we'll get everybody to agree on which service to use. Theoretically, the existing government registration system could be upgraded so that it meets these requirements, but I doubt it will happen.”


The goal here is to actually recommend some effective changes to the mayor that will happen. So, although I don't agree that this is the most effective approach...I say let's move forward with it. Nothing beats a failure but a try.


Next you mention


Let's assume that we get mutual agreement, or at least some agreement to move forward with bikeindex.org. Next steps:


* Integrate/link bikeindex.org on the front page of hbl.org

* find/work with any/all other bicycle organizations in Hawaii

* find any/all other hawaii+bicycle online forums and integrate/link there, too

* work with all bike shops to integrate bikeindex.org into their sales process. (bikeindex has an API and integration with the most popular point of sale system used by bike shops)

* create printed materials to be distributed at every opportunity explaining how/why to use bikeindex for registering and for checking before buying.

* have some kind of bicycle security event where we get government types to talk about how we're all working together to solve this problem. the main point of this event is to get media coverage of the new paradigm.”


I think these are all great ideas. A few questions relating to this train of thought. Will there be any money exchanged in any of these processes? Currently, the registration fee goes somewhere...I believe (but I still don't have clarification on this)...the current registration fees go to HBL and DOT???