Re: European shatter belt's musical characteristics?

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The Green Troll

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Mar 22, 2013, 4:57:43 AM3/22/13
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On Saturday, April 4, 2009 1:16:20 AM UTC-4, The Green Troll wrote:

> At 03:45 PM 3/26/09 -0700, The Green Troll wrote:
> >
> >David Reck, Music of the Whole Earth (1977), p24, shows a shatter
> >belt
> >running across Europe, roughly running around the borders of Finland,
> >Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Bukovina, Bessarabia, Thrace,
> >Albania, Slovenia, Austria, Checkia, and Silesia.

>Specifically, what characteristics make Russian folk music different from its neighbors to the west?

>Also, there is supposed to be a line across Poland. East of the line,
>chromatic scales are heavily used in folk music. West of the line, folk
>music is predominantly diatnoic. Where is the line across Poland?

To the west, Sweden and Bohemia are shown to be in diatonic territory.
Within the belt, Moravia and Finland have at least some chromaticism,
making them transitional.

In Poland, would it be correct to follow the dialect line? Greater
Polish and Kashubian, with the cities of Wroclaw, Bydgoszcz, and
Gdańsk, would be west of the line, in the diatonic folk music zone.
Lesser Polish, Masovian, and Silesian, with the cities of Warsaw,
Cracow, Katowice, Łódź, and Opole, would be east of the line, in the
chromatic folk music zone. If that is not the right place, it must be
close.

Beco dos Gatinhos
<http://www.rev.net/~aloe/music>

The Green Troll

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Mar 24, 2013, 3:18:01 AM3/24/13
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On Mar 22, 4:57 am, The Green Troll <a...@rev.net> wrote:
> On Saturday, April 4, 2009 1:16:20 AM UTC-4, The Green Troll wrote:
> > At 03:45 PM 3/26/09 -0700, The Green Troll wrote:
>
> > >David Reck, Music of the Whole Earth (1977), p24, shows a shatter
> > >belt
> > >running across Europe, roughly running around the borders of Finland,
> > >Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Bukovina, Bessarabia, Thrace,
> > >Albania, Slovenia, Austria, Checkia, and Silesia.
> >Specifically, what characteristics make Russian folk music different from its neighbors to the west?
> >Also, there is supposed to be a line across Poland. East of the line,
> >chromatic scales are heavily used in folk music. West of the line, folk
> >music is predominantly diatnoic. Where is the line across Poland?
>
> To the west, Sweden and Bohemia are shown to be in diatonic territory.
> Within the belt, Moravia and Finland have at least some chromaticism,
> making them transitional.
>
> In Poland, would it be correct to follow the dialect line? Greater
> Polish and Kashubian, with the cities of Wroclaw, Bydgoszcz, and
> Gdañsk, would be west of the line, in the diatonic folk music zone.
> Lesser Polish, Masovian, and Silesian, with the cities of Warsaw,
> Cracow, Katowice, £ód¼, and Opole, would be east of the line, in the
> chromatic folk music zone. If that is not the right place, it must be
> close.

Does that mean all of Kujawy folk music is based on the diatonic
genus?
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