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R.HERMOSO

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May 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/28/96
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Hola Folchetin... para que te las aprendas y las incluyas en tu firma
(esa tan original que tienes)

> [Image] Words of Wisdom from Albert Einstein [Image]
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> There's a wonderful family named Stein,
> There's Ep, there's Gert, and there's Ein.
> Ep's statues are junk,
> Gert's poems are bunk,
> And nobody understands Ein.
>
> Famous Quotes
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> "I cannot believe that God would choose to play dice with the
> universe." or sometimes quoted as "God does not play dice with the
> universe."
>
> "Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre
> minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not
> thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and
> courageously uses his intelligence."
>
> "Science without religion is lame, religion without science is
> blind."
> Science, Philosophy and Religion: a Symposium (1941) ch. 13
>
> "I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination.
> Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited.
> Imagination encircles the world."
> "What Life Means to Einstein: An Interview by George Sylvester
> Viereck," for the October 26, 1929 issue of The Saturday Evening
> Post.
>
> "The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is
> the source of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a
> stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe,
> is as good as dead: his eyes are closed."
> Quoted on pg. 289 of Adventures of a Mathematician, by S. M.
> Ulam(Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, 1976). Apparently these
> words also occur somewhere in What I Believe (1930).
>
> "Gravitation can not be held responsible for people falling in love"
>
> "Few are those who see with their own eyes and feel with their own
> hearts."
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Science/Mathematics
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> "Science is the century-old endeavour to bring together by means of
> systematic thought the perceptible phenomena of this world into as
> thorough-going an association as possible. To put it boldly, it is
> the attempt at a posterior reconstruction of existen ce by the
> process of conceptualisation. Science can only ascertain what is,
> but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgements
> of all kinds remain necessary."
>
> "I maintain that cosmic religiousness is the strongest and most
> noble driving force of scientific research."
>
> "Why does this applied science, which saves work and makes life
> easier, bring us so little happiness? The simple answer runs:
> Because we have not yet learned to make sensible use of it."
>
> "Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you
> mine are far greater."
>
> "Science without religion is lame, religion without science is
> blind."
> Science, Philosophy and Religion: a Symposium (1941) ch. 13
>
> "The process of scientific discovery is, in effect, a continual
> flight from wonder."
>
> "As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not
> certain, and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to
> reality. "
>
> "The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday
> thinking."
>
> "If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called
> research, would it?"
>
> "Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and
> wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and
> observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science"
>
> "When the number of factors coming into play in a phenomenological
> complex is too large scientific method in most cases fails. One need
> only think of the weather, in which case the prediction even for a
> few days ahead is impossible. Neverthess, noone doub ts that we are
> confronted with a causal connection whose causal components are in
> the main known to us. Occurrences in this domain are beyond the
> reach of exact perdiction because of the variety of factors in
> operation, not because of any lack of order in nature."
>
> "Scientific research is based on the idea that everything that takes
> place is determined by laws of nature, and therefore this holds for
> the action of people. For this reason, a research scientist will
> hardly be inclined to believe that events could be i nfluenced by a
> prayer, i.e. by a wish addressed to a Supernatural Being."
> [Albert Einstein, 1936, responding to a child who wrote and asked if
> scientists pray. Source: "Albert Einstein: The Human Side", Edited
> by Helen Dukas and Banesh Hoffmann]
>
> "In the temple of science are many mansions, and various indeed are
> they that dwell therein and the motives that have led them hither.
> Many take to science out of a joyful sense of superior intellectual
> power; science is their own special sport to which t hey look for
> vivid experience and the satisfaction of ambition; many others are
> to be found in the temple who have offered the products of their
> brains on this altar for purely utilitarian purposes. Were an angel
> of the Lord to come and drive all the peop le belonging to these two
> categories out of the temple, the assemblage would be seriously
> depleted, but there would still be some men, of both present and
> past times, left inside"
>
> "I think that a particle must have a separate reality independent of
> the measurements. That is an electron has spin, location and so
> forth even when it is not being measured. I like to think that the
> moon is there even if I am not looking at it."
>
> "All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All
> these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting
> it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the
> individual towards freedom."
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Relativity
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> "Relativity teaches us the connection between the different
> descriptions of one and the same reality".
>
> "I sometimes ask myself how it came about that I was the one to
> develop the theory of relativity. The reason, I think, is that a
> normal adult never stops to think about problems of space and time.
> These are things which he has thought about as a child. Bu t my
> intellectual development was retarded,as a result of which I began
> to wonder about space and time only when I had already grown up."
>
> "Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute, and it seems like an
> hour. Sit with a pretty girl for an hour, and it seems like a
> minute. THAT'S relativity."
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Himself
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> "When a blind beetle crawls over the surface of the globe, he
> doesn't realize that the track he has covered is curved. I was lucky
> enough to have spotted it."
>
> "I have no particular talent. I am merely inquisitive."
>
> "It's not that I'm so smart , it's just that I stay with problems
> longer ."
>
> "If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber."
>
> "If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often
> think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms
> of music. ... I get most joy in life out of music."
> "What Life Means to Einstein: An Interview by George Sylvester
> Viereck," for the October 26, 1929 issue of The Saturday Evening
> Post.
>
> "I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination.
> Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited.
> Imagination encircles the world."
> "What Life Means to Einstein: An Interview by George Sylvester
> Viereck," for the October 26, 1929 issue of The Saturday Evening
> Post.
>
> "I want to know God's thoughts,..... the rest are details.."
>
> "My life is a simple thing that would interest no one. It is a known
> fact that I was born and that is all that is necessary."
>
> "As far as I'm concerned, I prefer silent vice to ostentatious
> virtue."
>
> This is a story I heard as a freshman at the University of Utah when
> Dr. Henry Eyring was still teaching chemistry there. Many years
> before he and Dr. Einstein were colleagues. As they walked together
> they noted an unusual plant growing along a garden walk. Dr. Eyring
> asked Dr. Einstein if he knew what the plant was. Einstein did not,
> and together they consulted a gardener. The gardener indicated the
> plant was green beans and forever afterwards Eyring said Einstein
> didn't know beans . I heard th is second hand and I don't know if
> the story has ever been published...
> -S K Franz-
>
> "When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the
> conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my
> talent for absorbing positive knowledge."
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Religion/God
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> "True religion is real living; living with all one's soul, with all
> one's goodness and righteousness."
>
> "Science without religion is lame, religion without science is
> blind."
> _Science, Philosophy and Religion: a Symposium_ (1941) ch. 13
>
> "I cannot believe that God would choose to play dice with the
> universe." or sometimes quoted as "God does not play dice with the
> universe."
>
> "When the solution is simple, God is answering."
>
> "I want to know God's thoughts,..... the rest are details.."
>
> "I cannot imagine a God who rewards and punishes the objects of his
> creation, whose purposes are modeled after our own -- a God, in
> short, who is but a reflection of human frailty. Neither can I
> believe that the individual survives the death of his body, although
> feeble souls harbor such thoughts through fear or ridiculous
> egotisms."
> [Albert Einstein, obituary in New York Times, 19 April 1955]
>
> "The religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. The religion
> which based on experience, which refuses dogmatic. If there's any
> religion that would cope the scientific needs it will be
> Buddhism...."
>
> "I cannot conceive of a God who rewards and punishes his creatures,
> or has a will of the kind that we experience in ourselves. Neither
> can I nor would I want to conceive of an individual that survives
> his physical death; let feeble souls, from fear or ab surd egoism,
> cherish such thoughts. I am satisfied with the mystery of the
> eternity of life and with the awareness and a glimpse of the
> marvelous structure of the existing world, together with the devoted
> striving to comprehend a portion, be it ever so tiny, of the Reason
> that manifests itself in nature."
> [Albert Einstein,_The World as I See It_]
>
> "We should take care not to make the intellect our god; it has, of
> course, powerful muscles, but no personality."
>
> "The highest principles for our aspirations and judgements are given
> to us in the Jewish-Christian religious tradition. It is a very high
> goal which, with our weak powers, we can reach only very
> inadequately, but which gives a sure foundation to our aspir ations
> and valuations. If one were to take that goal out of out of its
> religious form and look merely at its purely human side, one might
> state it perhaps thus: free and responsible development of the
> individual, so that he may place his powers freely and gladly in the
> service of all mankind. ... it is only to the individual that a soul
> is given. And the high destiny of the individual is to serve rather
> than to rule, or to impose himself in any otherway."
>
> "Intelligence makes clear to us the interrelationship of means and
> ends. But mere thinking cannot give us a sense of the ultimate and
> fundamental ends. To make clear these fundamental ends and
> valuations and to set them fast in the emotional life of the i
> ndividual, seems to me precisely the most important function which
> religion has to form in the social life of man."
>
> "All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All
> these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting
> it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the
> individual towards freedom."
>
> "A man's ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy,
> education, and social ties and needs; no religious basis is
> necessary. Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be
> restrained by fear of punishment and hope of reward after death."
> [Albert Einstein, "Religion and Science", New York Times Magazine, 9
> November 1930]
>
> "The mystical trend of our time, which shows itself particularly in
> the rampant growth of the so-called Theosophy and Spiritualism, is
> for me no more than a symptom of weakness and confusion. Since our
> inner experiences consist of reproductions, and comb inations of
> sensory impressions, the concept of a soul without a body seem to me
> to be empty and devoid of meaning."
>
> "It was, of course, a lie what you read about my religious
> convictions, a lie which is being systematically repeated. I do not
> believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have
> expressed it clearly. If something is in me which can be called
> religious then it is the unbounded admiration for the structure of
> the world so far as our science can reveal it."
> [Albert Einstein, 1954, from "Albert Einstein: The Human Side",
> edited by Helen Dukas and Banesh Hoffman, Princeton University
> Press]
>
> "I am convinced that some political and social activities and
> practices of the Catholic organizations are detrimental and even
> dangerous for the community as a whole, here and everywhere. I
> mention here only the fight against birth control at a time when
> overpopulation in various countries has become a serious threat to
> the health of people and a grave obstacle to any attempt to organize
> peace on this planet."
> [ letter, 1954]
>
> "Scientific research is based on the idea that everything that takes
> place is determined by laws of nature, and therefore this holds for
> the action of people. For this reason, a research scientist will
> hardly be inclined to believe that events could be influenced by a
> prayer, i.e. by a wish addressed to a Supernatural Being."
> [Albert Einstein, 1936, responding to a child who wrote and asked if
> scientists pray. Source: "Albert Einstein: The Human Side", Edited
> by Helen Dukas and Banesh Hoffmann]
>
> "I cannot conceive of a personal God who would directly influence
> the actions of individuals, or would directly sit in judgment on
> creatures of his own creation. I cannot do this in spite of the fact
> that mechanistic causality has, to a certain extent, b een placed in
> doubt by modern science. [He was speaking of Quantum Mechanics and
> the breaking down of determinism.] My religiosity consists in a
> humble admiratation of the infinitely superior spirit that reveals
> itself in the little that we, with our we ak and transitory
> understanding, can comprehend of reality. Morality is of the highest
> importance -- but for us, not for God."
> [Albert Einstein, from "Albert Einstein: The Human Side", edited by
> Helen Dukas and Banesh Hoffman, Princeton University Press]
>
> "The further the spiritual evolution of mankind advances, the more
> certain it seems to me that the path to genuine religiosity does not
> lie through the fear of life, and the fear of death, and blind
> faith, but through striving after rational knowledge."
>
> "The finest emotion of which we are capable is the mystic emotion.
> Herein lies the germ of all art and all true science. Anyone to whom
> this feeling is alien, who is no longer capable of wonderment and
> lives in a state of fear is a dead man. To know that what is
> impenatrable for us really exists and manifests itself as the
> highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, whose gross forms alone
> are intelligible to our poor faculties - this knowledge, this
> feeling ... that is the core of the true religious sent iment. In
> this sense, and in this sense alone, I rank myself amoung profoundly
> religious men."
>
> "The more a man is imbued with the ordered regularity of all events
> the firmer becomes his conviction that there is no room left by the
> side of this ordered regularity for causes of a different nature.
> For him neither the rule of human nor the rule of div ine will exist
> as an independent cause of natural events. To be sure, the doctrine
> of a personal God interfering with the natural events could never be
> refuted, in the real sense, by science, for this doctrine can always
> take refuge in those domains in wh ich scientific knowledge has not
> yet been able to set foot. But I am persuaded that such behaviour on
> the part of the representatives of religion would not only be
> unworthy but also fatal. For a doctrine which is able to maintain
> itself not in clear light but only in the dark, will of necessity
> lose its effect on mankind, with incalculable harm to human progress
> .... If it is one of the goals of religions to liberate maknind as
> far as possible from the bondage of egocentric cravings, desires,
> and fears, s cientific reasoning can aid religion in another sense.
> Although it is true that it is the goal of science to discover (the)
> rules which permit the association and foretelling of facts, this is
> not its only aim. It also seeks to reduce the connections disc
> overed to the smallest possible number of mutually independent
> conceptual elements. It is in this striving after the rational
> unification of the manifold that it encounters its greatest
> successes, even though it is precisely this attempt which causes it
> t o run the greatest risk of falling a prey to illusion. But whoever
> has undergone the intense experience of successful advances made in
> this domain, is moved by the profound reverence for the rationality
> made manifest in existence. By way of the understand ing he achieves
> a far reaching emancipation from the shackles of personal hopes and
> desires, and thereby attains that humble attitude of mind toward the
> grandeur of reason, incarnate in existence, and which, in its
> profoundest depths, is inaccessible to m an. This attitude, however,
> appears to me to be religious in the highest sense of the word. And
> so it seems to me that science not only purifies the religious
> imulse of the dross of its anthropomorphism but also contibutes to a
> religious spiritualisation of our understanding of life."
> [Albert Einstein, "Science, Philosophy, and Religion, A Symposium",
> published by the Conference on Science, Philosophy and Religion in
> Their Relation to the Democratic Way of Life, Inc., New York, 1941]
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Knowledge/Imagination/Creativity
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> "Whoever undertakes to set himself up as judge in the field of truth
> and knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the Gods."
>
> "When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come to the
> conclusion that the gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my
> talent for absorbing positive knowledge."
>
> "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."
>
> "The only source of knowledge is experience"
>
> "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a
> faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant
> and has forgotten the gift."
>
> "I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination.
> Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited.
> Imagination encircles the world."
> "What Life Means to Einstein: An Interview by George Sylvester
> Viereck," for the October 26, 1929 issue of The Saturday Evening
> Post.
>
> "We should take care not to make the intellect our god; it has, of
> course, powerful muscles, but no personality."
>
> "The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its
> own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he
> contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous
> structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely t o
> comprehend a little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy
> curiosity."
>
> "Reading, after a certain age, diverts the mind too much from its
> creative pursuits. Any man who read too much and uses his own brain
> too little falls into lazy habits of thinking."
>
> "Intelligence makes clear to us the interrelationship of means and
> ends. But mere thinking cannot give us a sense of the ultimate and
> fundamental ends. To make clear these fundamental ends and
> valuations and to set them fast in the emotional life of the i
> ndividual, seems to me precisely the most important function which
> religion has to form in the social life of man."
>
> "During the last century, and part of the one before, it was widely
> held that there was an unreconcilable conflict between knowledge and
> belief. The opinion prevailed amoung advanced minds that it was time
> that belief should be replaced increasingly by kn owledge; belief
> that did not itself rest on knowledge was superstition, and as such
> had to be opposed. According to this conception, the sole function
> of education was to open the way to thinking and knowing, and the
> school, as the outstanding organ for t he people's education, must
> serve that end exclusively."
> Quoting Newton
>
> "We all know, from what we experience with and within ourselves,
> that our conscious acts spring from our desires and our fears.
> Intuition tells us that that is true also of our fellows and of the
> higher animals. We all try to escape pain and death, w hile we seek
> what is pleasant. We are all ruled in what we do by impulses; and
> these impulses are so organised that our actions in general serve
> for our self preservation and that of the race. Hunger, love, pain,
> fear are some of those inner forces which rule the individual's
> instinct for self preservation. At the same time, as social beings,
> we are moved in the relations with our fellow beings by such
> feelings as sympathy, pride, hate, need for power, pity, and so on.
> All these primary impulses, not easi ly described in words, are the
> springs of man's actions. All such action would cease if those
> powerful elemental forces were to cease stirring within us. Though
> our conduct seems so very different from that of the higher animals,
> the primary instincts are much aloke in them and in us. The most
> evident difference springs from the important part which is played
> in man by a relatively strong power of imagination and by the
> capacity to think, aided as it is by language and other symbolical
> devices. Thought is the organising factor in man, intersected
> between the causal primary instincts and the resulting actions. In
> that way imagination and intelligence enter into our existence in
> the part of servants of the primary instincts. But their
> intervention makes our acts to serve ever less merely the immediate
> claims of our instincts."
>
> "Knowledge of what is does not open the door directly to what should
> be. If one asks the whence derives the authority of fundamental
> ends, since they cannot be stated and justifed merely by reason, one
> can only answer: they exist in a healthy society as p owerful
> traditions, which act upon the conduct and aspirations and
> judgements of the individuals; they are there, that is, as something
> living, without its being necessary to find justification for their
> existence. They come into being not through demonst ration but
> through revelation, through the medium of powerful personalities.
> One must not attempt to justify them, but rather to sense their
> nature simply and clearly."
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Life
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> "The devil has put a penalty on all things we enjoy in life. Either
> we suffer in health or we suffer in soul or we get fat."
>
> "The pursuit of truth and beauty is a sphere of activity in which we
> are permitted to remain children all our lives."
>
> "A table, a chair, a bowl of fruit and a violin; what else does a
> man need to be happy."
>
> "The fear of death is the most unjustified of all fears, for there's
> no risk of accident for someone who's dead."
>
> "The ideals which have always shone before me and filled me with the
> joy of living are goodness, beauty, and truth. To make a goal of
> comfort or happiness has never appealed to me; a system of ethics
> built on this basis would be sufficient only for a herd of cattle."
>
> "Without deep reflection one knows from daily life that one exists
> for other people ."
>
> "A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer
> life are based on the labors of others ."
>
> "Only a life lived for others is a life worth while ."
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> The Universe/The Mysterious/Nature
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
> "Two things inspire me to awe -- the starry heavens above and the
> moral universe within ."
>
> "It is a magnificent feeling to recognize the unity of complex
> phenomena which appear to be things quite apart from the direct
> visible truth."
>
> "Watch the stars, and from them learn. To the Master's honor all
> must turn, each in its track, without a sound, forever tracing
> Newton's ground."
> -- translation by Dave Fredrick
>
> "Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and
> I'm not sure about the former."
>
> "The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is
> the source of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a
> stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe,
> is as good as dead: his eyes are closed."
> Quoted on pg. 289 of Adventures of a Mathematician, by S. M.
> Ulam(Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, 1976). Apparently these
> words also occur somewhere in What I Believe (1930).
>
> "The most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is
> comprehensible."
>
> "A human being is part of a whole, called by us the "Universe," a
> part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts
> and feelings, as something separated from the rest--a kind of
> optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of
> prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to
> affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free
> ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to
> embrace all living creatures and the whole of natu re in its
> beauty."
>
> "The human mind is not capable of grasping the Universe. We are like
> a little child entering a huge library. The walls are covered to the
> ceilings with books in many different tongues. The child knows that
> someone must have written these books. It doe s not know who or how.
> It does not understand the languages in which they are written. But
> the child notes a definite plan in the arrangement of the books---a
> mysterious order which it does not comprehend, but only dimly
> suspects."
>
> "The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its
> own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he
> contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous
> structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely t o
> comprehend a little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy
> curiosity."
>
> "What I see in Nature is a magnificent structure that we can
> comprehend only very imperfectly, and that must fill a thinking
> person with a feeling of "humility." This is a genuinely religious
> feeling that has nothing to do with mysticism"
>
> "The finest emotion of which we are capable is the mystic emotion.
> Herein lies the germ of all art and all true science. Anyone to whom
> this feeling is alien, who is no longer capable of wonderment and
> lives in a state of fear is a dead man. To know that what is
> impenatrable for us really exists and manifests itself as the
> highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, whose gross forms alone
> are intelligible to our poor faculties - this knowledge, this
> feeling ... that is the core of the true religious sent iment. In
> this sense, and in this sense alone, I rank myself amoung profoundly
> religious men."
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------

Albert Folch

unread,
May 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/28/96
to

gracies, feia temps que les buscava !!!

On May 28, 2:14, R.HERMOSO wrote:
> Subject: Para el Folchet


> Hola Folchetin... para que te las aprendas y las incluyas en tu firma
> (esa tan original que tienes)
>
> >

> > "Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre
> > minds.

>-- End of excerpt from R.HERMOSO


aff.

ps. "caca" i "bollicao" es diuen igual en castella. que no ho vas entendre?


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