Gentile..what does this word mean?

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Lauralee

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Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
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>What is the translation of the word GENTILE?

Hmmm, don't know. But we just got an online example of the word "troll".
Take out noscum to reply.

Robert Tremonti

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Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
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Jason Black wrote:
>
> What is the translation of the word GENTILE?

Why not contact your local library and ask their research department?
Or drop in and look it up yourself.

Not only will you learn the answer to your question, but you'd also save
the rest of us the annoyance of your postings.

David deilley

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Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
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Robert Tremonti wrote:
>
> Jason Black wrote:
> >
> > What is the translation of the word GENTILE?
>
> Why not contact your local library and ask their research department?

Better yet - why not phone Tel Aviv and pester the Mossad?


> Or drop in and look it up yourself.
>
> Not only will you learn the answer to your question, but you'd also save
> the rest of us the annoyance of your postings.

Actually - it was the local librarian who suggested to him "Why don't
you go ask some of your stupid questions on the Internet?" So now he's
come full circle.

Message has been deleted

Haim Guivon

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Nov 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/25/97
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In Article<65dh2q$q...@milo.vcn.bc.ca>, <side...@vcn.bc.ca>

What is the translation of the word GENTILE?

================================================================

Not Jew.

(For mormons: Neither mormon nor jew).
---------------------------------------------------------------

Do you need a dictionary? I could send you an old one.

Haim
================================================================


Colin Rosenthal

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Nov 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/25/97
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On 25 Nov 1997 03:35:54 GMT,
Jason Black <side...@vcn.bc.ca> wrote:
>
>What is the translation of the word GENTILE?
>

"goy"

--
Colin Rosenthal
High Altitude Observatory
Boulder, Colorado
rose...@hao.ucar.edu

,,,

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Nov 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/25/97
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From article <65dh2q$q...@milo.vcn.bc.ca>, by side...@vcn.bc.ca (Jason Black):

>
> What is the translation of the word GENTILE?
>
The term is, I believe, of Latin origin. It comes from the word nation,
in Latin (gens), and the "ile" ending means literally, a member of. So,
a gentile is a person who is a member of one of the nations. It might
be taken to mean foreigner.

If you're a Mormon, it means non-Mormon. (As in the sentence: "The first
Gentile mayor of Salt Lake City was a Jew.")

If you're a Jew, it means non-Jew.

If you're reading the Bible, including certain passages in the New Testament,
it means non-Jew.

In translation from Hebrew to English, the Hebrew word goy (plural goyim)
is generally translated to gentile (or gentiles) if the primary issue is
one of religion, while it is usually translated as nation (or nations) if
issues of national government or collective behavior is the issue. Thus,
the well known prophesy of Isaiah is usually translated "nation shall not
lift up sword against nation" instead of "gentile shall not lift up sword
unto gentile."

Doug Jones
jo...@cs.uiowa.edu

Michael Poppers

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Nov 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/26/97
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Doug wrote:

> From article <65dh2q$q...@milo.vcn.bc.ca>, by side...@vcn.bc.ca (Jason Black):
> >
> > What is the translation of the word GENTILE?
> >
> The term is, I believe, of Latin origin. It comes from the word nation,
> in Latin (gens), and the "ile" ending means literally, a member of. So,
> a gentile is a person who is a member of one of the nations. It might
> be taken to mean foreigner.

> <If...then, etc. deleted>

According to the etymology listed by Webster's, the Latin noun "gens" (clan,
family, nation) evolved into "gentilis" (foreigner, heathen) before entering the
English vocabulary.

> Doug Jones
> jo...@cs.uiowa.edu

All the best from
--
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% Michael Poppers @ Kaye, Scholer et al., LLP
% Peritus Clavis % 425 Park Avenue #12-07 =**= New York, NY 10022
% Machinae Vivit % tel: 212/836-8299 =***= fax: 212/836-6499,-8689
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% e-mail: see message header, and tweak!

Daniel Magill

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Nov 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/26/97
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[Posted and mailed.]

In article <65etgp$elr$1...@ncar.ucar.edu>, rose...@asp.hao.ucar.edu
says...


> On 25 Nov 1997 03:35:54 GMT,
> Jason Black <side...@vcn.bc.ca> wrote:
> >

> >What is the translation of the word GENTILE?
> >
>

> "goy"
>

Which is actually a genus containing just two species - sheigitz and
shiksa. There used to be other representatives, but they went extinct
eons ago.

Danny

Graham Daveney

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Nov 27, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/27/97
to

Jason Black (side...@vcn.bc.ca) wrote:
:
: What is the translation of the word GENTILE?
:

I thought that it was a Greek word that means barbarian.

The Hebrew word for a non-Jew is goy, which translates as nation.

The nations = goyim.

The Jews are called goy kadosh meaning a nation that is holy.


Regards
Graham
gra...@daveney.matra.com.au

jwl

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Nov 30, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/30/97
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Gentile from Latin "nation"
jwl

Graham Daveney <gra...@daveney.matra.com.au> wrote in article
<65j9qr$bba$1...@daveney.matra.com.au>...

Glen Hallick

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Nov 30, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/30/97
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Jason Black wrote:
>
> What is the translation of the word GENTILE?

Which one? There are several meanings for the word, but after reading
some the bullshit you like the post I have every confidence in you that
you'll want the one that best suits your racist far right agenda.

Glen Hallick

Justin C. Fauci

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Dec 3, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/3/97
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True but some people have decided that calling non-Jews Goyim is
Pajoritive and in their quest to be completely Politically Correct and
rewrite both english and Hebrew decided that Gentile is the "nicer" word.

If it does mean barbarian in Greek (I don't know and am too busy to look
it up) than would be just a tad ironic.
Actually I hope it does to make the PC whiners look foolish (not that they
don't already)


Justin


On 27 Nov 1997, Graham Daveney wrote:

> Jason Black (side...@vcn.bc.ca) wrote:
> :
> : What is the translation of the word GENTILE?

jake

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Dec 3, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/3/97
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>
> Suddenly I feel guilty that I did not go to law school. Right now I
> could be handling Ms. Black's divorce from Jason.
>
> Glen Hallick


White inflatable rubber dolls are denied all human rights, including
divorce. That's one of the first things you learn in law school !
--
.-"-.
/|6 6|\
{/(_0_)\}
/ ^ \_
(/ /^\ \)-'
""' '""

Jake

mei...@erols.com

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Dec 5, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/5/97
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In soc.culture.jewish on Wed, 03 Dec 1997 21:00:28 GMT
kpo...@nospam.ca (Karl Pollak) posted:

>x-no-archive: yes
> Justin C. Fauci wrote:

>>True but some people have decided that calling non-Jews Goyim is
>>Pajoritive and in their quest to be completely Politically Correct and
>>rewrite both english and Hebrew decided that Gentile is the "nicer" word.

>Goy - goyim is perjorative by its use. But using "gentile" by the same
>token can be used the same way as saying "darkie" instead of "nigger".
>Not much of an improvement. You cannot legislate people's attitudes.

I heard someone say that non-Jew was offensive. That leaves no word
that is acceptable to convey a very real type of person. Actually
neither goy, gentile, or non-Jew is offensive, although one can use
them that way. You should have heard my uncle say 'Republican'.

meir


David Lloyd-Jones

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Dec 5, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/5/97
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mei...@erols.com wrote


>
>I heard someone say that non-Jew was offensive. That leaves no word
>that is acceptable to convey a very real type of person. Actually
>neither goy, gentile, or non-Jew is offensive, although one can use
>them that way. You should have heard my uncle say 'Republican'.
>

Yeah, but some goyim are perfectly decent people...

-dlj.

jake

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Dec 5, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/5/97
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"Gentile" is about as common now as "gramophone". I remember hearing the
word as a kid. My grandparents on my Dad's side and their friends used
to use it. It didn't sound to me as though it was being used
derogatively, rather as a common distinction in that generation between
who you could trust and who you couldn't. Without a doubt, two
generations back (ie pre-WW2) there was a lot more distrust between Jew
and Non-Jew.

Incidentally, my parents never used that word and neither does anyone I
know of my own generation. I've no doubt there are a few uptight
fundamentalists in New York and elsewhere that still use the term, but
to me and most other Jews, it's just a word that brings back memories of
childhood Friday night dinners, sickly sweet wine and Grandma's gefilte
fish (sigh)

Albert Reingewirtz

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Dec 6, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/6/97
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In article <34884b75....@news.radiant.net>, kpo...@nospam.ca (Karl
Pollak) wrote:

> x-no-archive: yes


> mei...@erols.com wrote:
>
> >I heard someone say that non-Jew was offensive. That leaves no word
> >that is acceptable to convey a very real type of person. Actually
> >neither goy, gentile, or non-Jew is offensive, although one can use
> >them that way. You should have heard my uncle say 'Republican'.
>

> Well, exactly. Some folks will take offence even if all you say to them
> is "Good Morning".

Say Hello to your uncle! My type of uncle.

--
God is not dead, it never existed

Justin C. Fauci

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Dec 7, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/7/97
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On Wed, 3 Dec 1997, Karl Pollak wrote:

> x-no-archive: yes
> Justin C. Fauci wrote:
>
> >True but some people have decided that calling non-Jews Goyim is
> >Pajoritive and in their quest to be completely Politically Correct and
> >rewrite both english and Hebrew decided that Gentile is the "nicer" word.
>
> Goy - goyim is perjorative by its use. But using "gentile" by the same
> token can be used the same way as saying "darkie" instead of "nigger".
> Not much of an improvement. You cannot legislate people's attitudes.

So in other words there is no word that is not perjoritave?? Goy is
unacceptible, Gentile is unacceptible, what can we use, that won't "hurt
people's feelings"

There is a large difference between "Nigger" and Goy.
Goy is a valid hebrew word used in the Torah to mean "the nations of the
world" the other was intended from the beginning to be hateful.

This Political Correctness has gotten way out of hand!!!
If anyything the "real" meaning of Goyim is as nice a way to say it as
possible.

Gentile is a "watered down" version of Goy, I see no reason even to use
the word gentile.

You can't legislate people's attitudes but the word means what the word
means. The only reason it's deemed nasty is because of this drive to PC.



> >If it does mean barbarian in Greek (I don't know and am too busy to look
> >it up) than would be just a tad ironic.
>

> It doesn't. First of all it is not Greek but Latin, secondly barbarian
> means "the bearded one" (Latin 'barba' = beard, hence 'barber') and was
> originally used by the Romans to describe the Goths, whose custom was to
> wear beards as opposed to the clean shaven Romans. It became to
> designate anyone uncivilized or of poor manners, that is, a foreigner.

I didn't say it was greek, prior posts made that claim.
>
> Another theory is that it came from the Latin word "barbarus" one whose
> langugage is unintelligible, hence a foreigner. Both theories are
> somewhat complementary and sort of become a chicken/egg argument.
>
> Other languages have similar expressions denoting either foreigners as
> such or specific other nations, mostly referring to them as "dumb" as in
> unable to speak or to their manners.
>
> The Nazi attack on the Soviet Union was codenamed "Barbarosa" - Red
> Beard an allusion to Stalin's bushy moustache.

Thanks for clearing that up.

Justin Fauci

>


mei...@erols.com

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Dec 7, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/7/97
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In soc.culture.jewish on Fri, 5 Dec 1997 10:47:39 -0500 "David
Lloyd-Jones" <d...@globalserve.net> posted:


>mei...@erols.com wrote
>>
>>I heard someone say that non-Jew was offensive. That leaves no word
>>that is acceptable to convey a very real type of person. Actually
>>neither goy, gentile, or non-Jew is offensive, although one can use
>>them that way. You should have heard my uncle say 'Republican'.
>>

>Yeah, but some goyim are perfectly decent people...

Why do you say 'but'? I never said otherwise, and of course that is
true. Some of my best friends are goyim. :)

posted

> -dlj.


meir


Susan Cohen

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Dec 7, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/7/97
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Karl Pollak wrote:

> x-no-archive: yes


> David Lloyd-Jones wrote:
>
> >Yeah, but some goyim are perfectly decent people...
>

> Then they're no goyim, just neighbours ...
> :-)

I'm glad you remembered the Smiley (tm).


Sven Noltemeier

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Dec 7, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/7/97
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jake <jake...@tpts1.seed.net.tw> wrote:

>Karl Pollak wrote:

--
.-"-.
/|6 6|\
{/(_0_)\}
/ ^ \_
(/ /^\ \)-'
""' '""

>Jake


No, Karl didn't decapitate people in this newsgroup.

BTW, maybe the charta of s.c.j.moderated should be appended to forbid
this.

;-)
Sven

David Lloyd-Jones

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Dec 7, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/7/97
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mei...@erols.com wrote


"David Lloyd-Jones" <d...@globalserve.net> posted:
>>mei...@erols.com wrote
>>>

>>> ........You should have heard my uncle say 'Republican'.


>>>
>
>>Yeah, but some goyim are perfectly decent people...
>

>Why do you say 'but'? I never said otherwise, and of course that is
>true. Some of my best friends are goyim. :)

What is this joint turning into, a compulsory goddam smiley zone?

-dlj.

>
>posted
>
>> -dlj.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>meir
>

samuel

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Dec 8, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/8/97
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In article <348ae7e1....@news.radiant.net>, kpo...@nospam.ca says...

>
>x-no-archive: yes
> Justin C. Fauci wrote:
>
>>So in other words there is no word that is not perjoritave?? Goy is
>>unacceptible, Gentile is unacceptible, what can we use, that won't "hurt
>>people's feelings"
>
>The point of the post was to show that if anyone wants to be offended,
>he will be. The current fashion of hunting down any word for sport is
>making it impossible to find any non-ffensive words.
>


Words are just words!

It is time we all stopped being 'politically correct'!
It has got to the point where we just must object.
We are so hung up on the *perceived* meaning of words,
we'll say, "nomadic Turkic people", when what we mean is ... 'Kurds'.

Words are just words ... they have no power!
Until ... some 'insecure person' chooses to cower,
at the sound of some inoffensive word,
like Mick or Spick or Nigger or Nerd.

The list goes on ... with Kike, Limey, Chink,
Yank, Canuck, Rusky, Bohunk and Fink.
Homo, Queer, Faggot, on and on it can go,
until finally ... the absurdity begins to show.

There is an old rhyme about sticks and stones,
which points out ... WORDS ... cannot break bones.
Those ... offended by the words Jap and Jew,
should ponder upon that old rhyme ... a time or two.

There's not a single word in any known tongue,
that could not be proclaimed ... crude, lewd or dung.
It is time we corrected this stupid pitfall,
of allowing mere words ... any power at all!


samuel


mei...@erols.com

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Dec 8, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/8/97
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In soc.culture.jewish on Fri, 05 Dec 1997 18:35:39 +0800 jake
<jake...@tpts1.seed.net.tw> posted:

I agree. In this era of good feeling, we have started using goy,
which literally means the same thing, but it just doesn't have that
sentimental feel that you describe.

:)


>Karl Pollak wrote:

>--
> .-"-.
> /|6 6|\
> {/(_0_)\}
> / ^ \_
> (/ /^\ \)-'
> ""' '""

>Jake


meir


mei...@erols.com

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Dec 8, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/8/97
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In soc.culture.jewish on Sat, 06 Dec 1997 12:32:53 -0800
albertre...@access1.net (Albert Reingewirtz) posted:

>In article <34884b75....@news.radiant.net>, kpo...@nospam.ca (Karl
>Pollak) wrote:

>> x-no-archive: yes


>> mei...@erols.com wrote:
>>
>> >I heard someone say that non-Jew was offensive. That leaves no word
>> >that is acceptable to convey a very real type of person. Actually
>> >neither goy, gentile, or non-Jew is offensive, although one can use

>> >them that way. You should have heard my uncle say 'Republican'.
>>
>> Well, exactly. Some folks will take offence even if all you say to them
>> is "Good Morning".

>Say Hello to your uncle! My type of uncle.

Well, I said "Good Morning" to him instead, and he took offence.

meir


mei...@erols.com

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Dec 8, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/8/97
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In soc.culture.jewish on Sun, 7 Dec 1997 23:31:35 -0500 "David
Lloyd-Jones" <d...@globalserve.net> posted:


>mei...@erols.com wrote
>"David Lloyd-Jones" <d...@globalserve.net> posted:
>>>mei...@erols.com wrote
>>>>
>>>> ........You should have heard my uncle say 'Republican'.
>>>>
>>
>>>Yeah, but some goyim are perfectly decent people...
>>
>>Why do you say 'but'? I never said otherwise, and of course that is
>>true. Some of my best friends are goyim. :)

>What is this joint turning into, a compulsory goddam smiley zone?

> -dlj.
I have been censured in the past for not smiling.

Anyhow it turns out the 'but' referred to the higher regard you had
for goyim than for Repulbicans. I can understand that.


>>
>>posted
>>
>>> -dlj.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>meir
>>


meir


Barton Jaques

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Dec 8, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/8/97
to Karl Pollak

> > It doesn't. First of all it is not Greek but Latin, secondly barbarian
> > means "the bearded one" (Latin 'barba' = beard, hence 'barber') and was
> > originally used by the Romans to describe the Goths, whose custom was to
> > wear beards as opposed to the clean shaven Romans. It became to
> > designate anyone uncivilized or of poor manners, that is, a foreigner.


A recent issue of National Geographic claimed that "barbars" were so
named by the Romans for the "bar-bar" nonsense noises they made, in
their guttural Germanic tongues.

The "barba" bearded explanation has been around for a long time, and
makes sense, except that beards would have been pretty commonplace even
to Romans. Would they divide the world into "beards" and "skins"? Maybe
...

Crawford Kilian

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Dec 8, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/8/97
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Barton Jaques,zer...@smartt.com,Internet writes:
The "barba" bearded explanation has been around for a long time, and
makes sense, except that beards would have been pretty commonplace even
to Romans. Would they divide the world into "beards" and "skins"? Maybe

CK:
The word is indeed Greek: "barbaroi" were non-Hellenic, non-cultured,
foreign, and rude. The Romans picked up the word and applied it to non-Romans
and non-Greeks. Don't know if they applied it to the Egyptians (but after
Alexander, Egypt's ruling class was Greek anyway and who cared about the
peasants?).

A moment's consultation with a dictionary confirmed my understanding of the
word as Greek. Sometimes print media really are better.


Glen Hallick

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Dec 8, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/8/97
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Barton Jaques wrote:
>
> > > It doesn't. First of all it is not Greek but Latin, secondly barbarian
> > > means "the bearded one" (Latin 'barba' = beard, hence 'barber') and was
> > > originally used by the Romans to describe the Goths, whose custom was to
> > > wear beards as opposed to the clean shaven Romans. It became to
> > > designate anyone uncivilized or of poor manners, that is, a foreigner.
>
> A recent issue of National Geographic claimed that "barbars" were so
> named by the Romans for the "bar-bar" nonsense noises they made, in
> their guttural Germanic tongues.
>
> The "barba" bearded explanation has been around for a long time, and
> makes sense, except that beards would have been pretty commonplace even
> to Romans. Would they divide the world into "beards" and "skins"? Maybe
> ...

Barbarians smarbarians. Take a lesson from the Icelanders: berserker!

Glen Hallick

Jacob Love

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Dec 9, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/9/97
to

In article <348C81...@smartt.com>,

Barton Jaques <zer...@smartt.com> wrote:
>> > It doesn't. First of all it is not Greek but Latin, secondly barbarian
>> > means "the bearded one" (Latin 'barba' = beard, hence 'barber') and was
>> > originally used by the Romans to describe the Goths, whose custom was to
>> > wear beards as opposed to the clean shaven Romans. It became to
>> > designate anyone uncivilized or of poor manners, that is, a foreigner.
>A recent issue of National Geographic claimed that "barbars" were so
>named by the Romans for the "bar-bar" nonsense noises they made, in
>their guttural Germanic tongues.
>
>The "barba" bearded explanation has been around for a long time, and
>makes sense, except that beards would have been pretty commonplace even
>to Romans. Would they divide the world into "beards" and "skins"? Maybe

I didn't see the origin of this post, but at least one of the
intermediate authors is absolutely wrong. The word *is* Greek and is
attested as early as Homer. As far as I know, this puts it quite a few
centuries earlier than any known Latin text. The usual etymology does
suggest that it was onomotopoia for the nonsense syllables the Greeks
apprehended from the speech of non-Greek peoples. The funny thing is
that the Greeks certainly considered the Latins to be within the scope
of the term, but when the Latins adopted the word, they used it in the
sense of a member of the non-cultured people and graciously included
the Greeks within the scope. Therefore, the term means "non-Greek" in
Greek, but "non-Latin nor Greek" in Latin.

The beard thing is legend I suspect, I don't see it in any of the
standard lexicons.

--
-----------------------
Jack F. Love
Opinions expressed are mine alone, unless you happen to agree

Daniel Swan

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Dec 9, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/9/97
to

Onegba Wndhrf (mre...@fznegg.pbz) jebgr:
: > > Vg qbrfa'g. Svefg bs nyy vg vf abg Terrx ohg Yngva, frpbaqyl oneonevna
: > > zrnaf "gur orneqrq bar" (Yngva 'oneon' = orneq, urapr 'oneore') naq jnf
: > > bevtvanyyl hfrq ol gur Ebznaf gb qrfpevor gur Tbguf, jubfr phfgbz jnf gb
: > > jrne orneqf nf bccbfrq gb gur pyrna funira Ebznaf. Vg orpnzr gb
: > > qrfvtangr nalbar hapvivyvmrq be bs cbbe znaaref, gung vf, nsbervtare.

Nygubhtu gurer frrzf gb or n pbtangr urer, naq lbhe pbapyhfvba vf
abg haernfbanoyr, vg vf, va snpg, hagehr.

: N erprag vffhr bs Angvbany Trbtencuvp pynvzrq gung "oneonef" jrer fb
: anzrq ol gur Ebznaf sbe gur "one-one" abafrafr abvfrf gurl znqr, va
: gurve thggheny Treznavp gbathrf.

Guvf, nygubhtu fbzrjung haoryvrinoyr, vf gehr. Va snpg, V urne
gurl fgvyy gnyx va Oneonuone gnyx bire gurer.

Qna Fjna,
Pb-Cerfvqrag bs gur Pynffvpf Fghqragf Fbpvrgl,
Havirefvgl bs Pnytnel.

Barbarbarbah bah barbahbar bar

mei...@erols.com

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Dec 9, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/9/97
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In soc.culture.jewish on 9 Dec 1997 02:36:17 GMT
ds...@acs5.acs.ucalgary.ca (Daniel Swan) posted:

>Barbarbarbah bah barbahbar bar

bababa bababaran ba-ba-ba bababaran o teyk mai hand babaran


Yu got mi rawkin ana rolin, rawkin ina rithm babara-a-an.



meir


Albert Reingewirtz

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Dec 10, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/10/97
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In article <66ia6t$h...@srvr1.engin.umich.edu>, jl...@engin.umich.edu
(Jacob Love) wrote:

Thank you! I've learned something new.

Avital Pilpel

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Dec 18, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/18/97
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mei...@erols.com wrote:

The other day (so help me god) I passed a van of a company that tiles
floors and ceilings with ceramics, and it was named "Gen-tile"... I
don't know _who_ offered them that name!


Dvorah

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Dec 18, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/18/97
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> The other day (so help me god) I passed a van of a company that tiles
>floors and ceilings with ceramics, and it was named "Gen-tile"... I
>don't know _who_ offered them that name!

Gentile is a common Italian surname. Ya didn't know that?
I use the term "gentile" because I will not use the term "non-Jew" or "goy."
To me it's just a neutral term to describe non-Jew. When I mean Christian
or Muslim or Buddhist or Hindu specifically, I say it.

Dvorah

--
"I'm shocked, shocked."--Claude Rains in Casablanca

Micha Berger

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Dec 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/19/97
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I grew up thinking that "gentile" was an antisemitic slur, in that it
equates non-Jew will being genteel, or a gentleman.

Similarly, I though "synagogue" was from the root /syn/ meaning left or
evil, and gogue as in pedagogue -- ie a place where they preach evil.

I've been happy to learn I was wrong in both cases.

-mi

--
Micha Berger (973) 916-0287 Help free Ron Arad, held by Syria 3999 days!
mi...@aishdas.org (16-Oct-86 - 19-Dec-97)
For a mitzvah is a candle, and the Torah its light.
http://aishdas.org -- Orthodox Judaism: Torah, Avodah, Chessed

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