eggrolls vs. spring rolls. Are there any eggrolls in CA?

265 views
Skip to first unread message

atwe...@my-deja.com

unread,
Dec 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/26/99
to

I am in desparate need of east coast style eggrolls. NOT spring
rolls. There is a definite distinction, at least in New York City
Chinese restaurants. I define an eggroll to have a thick shell (I
believe wonton skin) with little cubes of pork in the middle, and are
quite thick, and are fried. Is there any Chinese restaurant AT ALL in
the entire bay area that serves these style of eggrolls, or an Asian
market or grocery store, and preferably with duck sauce and not that
ridiculous sweet & sour sauce? (a good sign would be if a restaurant
that serves these, sells them individually, so whenever I see eggrolls
or 2 or 4 eggrolls for whatever, that most likely isn't what I'm
looking for)

Don't get me wrong. I am not dissapointed with the spring rolls out
here, but I sure do miss the eggrolls I used to have in new york, so
mush so that everytime I visit my home town, I bring back at least a
couple dozen frozen eggrolls from my favorite local Chinese restaurant
in Queens. From what I found out last time I visited there, they said
those eggrolls are more Americanized and that Chinese restaurants out
here might be more authentic. To hell with authentic! I want
Americanized Chinese food sometimes! Sure I enjoy dim sum
and "authentic" Chinese cuisine at times, but I just can't live without
having eggrolls & duck sauce sometimes.

Thankfully I have found a few New York style pizza restaurants around
here, but still on the hunt for decent biales at bagel stores.

And please, I don't want to here anyone tell me that I should learn to
enjoy new cuisines out here that are different than what I'm used to.
I don't give up that easily. If needbe, I'll cook the damn things
myself. BTW, the strange thing is is that the closest I found to east
coast style eggrolls out here is at Jack in the Box! (but they don't
have little cubes of pork in the middle, and are not the same size, and
are served with sweet & source sauce and not duck sauce (but that can
be remedied by using duck sauce from an Asian grocery store, but still
that's nowhere near the same as the duck sauce found in those little
plastic packets at Chinese restaurants on the east coast)). Which
leads me to my next question is where can I find east coast style duck
sauce out here that I was used to over there.

-Andrew Weinstein


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

Matt Ackeret

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
In article <8463lq$u8$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>I am in desparate need of east coast style eggrolls. NOT spring
>rolls. There is a definite distinction, at least in New York City
>Chinese restaurants. I define an eggroll to have a thick shell (I
>believe wonton skin) with little cubes of pork in the middle, and are
>quite thick, and are fried. Is there any Chinese restaurant AT ALL in
...

>myself. BTW, the strange thing is is that the closest I found to east
>coast style eggrolls out here is at Jack in the Box! (but they don't

Umm, if the closest thing you've found are Jack in the Box eggrolls, I
don't know when I've seen something that ISN'T what you'd consider an eggroll.

Specifically, what you can get at places like Mr. Chaus seem to be the
same thing..

And you can get boxes of frozen egg rolls (though sometimes only chicken, not
pork) at Costco.

>have little cubes of pork in the middle, and are not the same size, and
>are served with sweet & source sauce and not duck sauce (but that can
>be remedied by using duck sauce from an Asian grocery store, but still

Geez, I can never find a sweet and sour sauce the same as I eat in restaurants.
Yeah, generic "nuclear red" sauce. None of the grocery store sauces seem to
be close, but the closest I've found is Contadina (!) sweet and sour sauce in
a can. It's got pineapple and red peppers (not hot peppers) in it, but it's
pretty close.
--
mat...@area.com

atwe...@my-deja.com

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
In article <846c3t$1o6lt$1...@rn.area.com>,

mat...@vax.area.com (Matt Ackeret) wrote:
> In article <8463lq$u8$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com>
wrote:
> >I am in desparate need of east coast style eggrolls. NOT spring
> >rolls. There is a definite distinction, at least in New York City
> >Chinese restaurants. I define an eggroll to have a thick shell (I
> >believe wonton skin) with little cubes of pork in the middle, and are
> >quite thick, and are fried. Is there any Chinese restaurant AT ALL
in
> ...
> >myself. BTW, the strange thing is is that the closest I found to
east
> >coast style eggrolls out here is at Jack in the Box! (but they don't
>
> Umm, if the closest thing you've found are Jack in the Box eggrolls,
I
> don't know when I've seen something that ISN'T what you'd consider an
eggroll.
>
> Specifically, what you can get at places like Mr. Chaus seem to be the
> same thing..
>
> And you can get boxes of frozen egg rolls (though sometimes only
chicken, not
> pork) at Costco.

Not even close! I've tried that crap already. The skin may be similar,
but that's about it. And like you said, they only have the chicken
ones, and not pork. A real meat eggroll has pork, not chicken. With
chicken is SUPER americanized and taste like just plain American food.
And seriously, would you trust that the quality of eggrolls in a
grocery store would match anywhere near homemade eggrolls made fresh at
a Chinese restaurant? (BTW, I'm really pissed that Albertsons
(previously known as Lucky), well at least the one I visit, only
carries microwavable chicken steamed buns, and no longer the pork
steamed buns. I mean, really, when you go to any decent Chinese
restaurant/dim-sum restaurant, how often do you have chicken steamed
buns?! The most common and the best tasting steamed buns is the pork
ones for sure! Albertsons, bring the pork steamed buns back!!!
(Actually, a friend of mine mentioned that the Albertsons near him
might have it, so I'll have to check that out, or maybe Cosco)

>
> >have little cubes of pork in the middle, and are not the same size,
and
> >are served with sweet & source sauce and not duck sauce (but that can
> >be remedied by using duck sauce from an Asian grocery store, but
still
>
> Geez, I can never find a sweet and sour sauce the same as I eat in
restaurants.
> Yeah, generic "nuclear red" sauce. None of the grocery store sauces
seem to
> be close, but the closest I've found is Contadina (!) sweet and sour
sauce in
> a can. It's got pineapple and red peppers (not hot peppers) in it,
but it's
> pretty close.

Also, not even close. My argument wasn't about getting sweet & sour
sauce you find in the chinese restaurants around here in the grocery
store. I was trying to find duck sauce like you find in those little
plastic duck sauce packets in chinese restaurants on the east coast
(I'm referring primarily to New York, but other cities, including mid-
atlantic regions such as Pittsburgh, PA also has what I'm looking for.
Pretty much any place other than CA!) Of course, finding duck sauce is
secondary to what I'm really looking for, which is a REAL eggroll. The
duck sauce goes with only the REAL eggroll (or possibly lumpia, but
even that they use more of a sweet & sour type of sauce, just a bit
thicker), so even if you find duck sauce for me, it won't do me any
good without a REAL eggroll.

-Andrew

> --
> mat...@area.com

Matt Ackeret

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
In article <8476ti$n9b$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>In article <846c3t$1o6lt$1...@rn.area.com>,
> mat...@vax.area.com (Matt Ackeret) wrote:
>> In article <8463lq$u8$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com>
>wrote:
>> >I am in desparate need of east coast style eggrolls. NOT spring
>> >rolls. There is a definite distinction, at least in New York City
>> >Chinese restaurants. I define an eggroll to have a thick shell (I
>> >believe wonton skin) with little cubes of pork in the middle, and are
>> >quite thick, and are fried. Is there any Chinese restaurant AT ALL
>in
...
>> And you can get boxes of frozen egg rolls (though sometimes only
>chicken, not
>> pork) at Costco.
>
>Not even close! I've tried that crap already. The skin may be similar,
>but that's about it. And like you said, they only have the chicken
>ones, and not pork. A real meat eggroll has pork, not chicken. With

Ok, then I _really_ think that a textual description might not be able to
do this justice. I had thought that the major difference you were talking
about _was_ the skin. (The ones with really light and flaky skin are spring
rolls I presume. I like those too, but they're really messy since you get
flakes of the skin all over.)

Though one thing I didn't mention was that at Costco you _can_ get pork
varieties of the smaller egg rolls (around 36 in the same sized package that
there are 12 or 16 of the bigger ones). I am getting fuzzier here, but I
_think_ these actually may be called spring rolls on the package, but from my
experience they are just smaller versions of the big ones (same crunchy thick
coating), not the light flaky coating of spring rolls I've had in restaurants.

In short, Costco has pork variety of the small ones but not the big ones..
even though the small ones may be mistakenly called spring rolls.

>chicken is SUPER americanized and taste like just plain American food.
>And seriously, would you trust that the quality of eggrolls in a
>grocery store would match anywhere near homemade eggrolls made fresh at
>a Chinese restaurant? (BTW, I'm really pissed that Albertsons

Actually, are you even sure that they ARE made fresh at a Chinese restaurant?
I certainly sometimes get ones in restaurants that are hard to distinguish
from the frozen ones from Costco. The only difference I can tell is that
they're deep fried in restaurants and I bake them at home. (They're better
deep fried, but that's a pain to do at home and it's certainly much higher in
calories.)


>Also, not even close. My argument wasn't about getting sweet & sour
>sauce you find in the chinese restaurants around here in the grocery
>store. I was trying to find duck sauce like you find in those little

I know, I was just adding onto the general topic, saying that I haven't
been able to find the same kind of sweet & sour sauce that one can get in
restaurants. (I realize logically that it's probably mostly food coloring,
sugar, and vinegar..)

>thicker), so even if you find duck sauce for me, it won't do me any
>good without a REAL eggroll.

Is duck sauce different from plum sauce? (I presume it's not made FROM ducks,
it's meant to be eaten on duck..?)
--
mat...@area.com

mag...@rahul.net

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
On Mon, 27 Dec 1999 08:19:20 GMT, atwe...@my-deja.com wrote:

>Not even close! I've tried that crap already. The skin may be similar,
>but that's about it. And like you said, they only have the chicken
>ones, and not pork. A real meat eggroll has pork, not chicken. With

>chicken is SUPER americanized and taste like just plain American food.
>And seriously, would you trust that the quality of eggrolls in a
>grocery store would match anywhere near homemade eggrolls made fresh at
>a Chinese restaurant? (BTW, I'm really pissed that Albertsons

>(previously known as Lucky), well at least the one I visit, only
>carries microwavable chicken steamed buns, and no longer the pork
>steamed buns.

Try the dim-sum counters at the Ranch 99 supermarkets in Cupertino and Milpitas.
They have the BBQ pork steamed buns, perhaps their egg rolls are the type you
are looking for too.


Allan Schaffer

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
atwe...@my-deja.com said..
> [egg rolls w/ duck sauce]

This thread came around about a year ago, you might check the
deja.com archives to see if there were any finds in the area. One
thing I vaguely remember is that what's known on the east coast as
'duck sauce' is sold in supermarkets as 'hoisin sauce' out here.

As for the egg rolls, this isn't much help, but there's a little
corner market on the corner of 26th & Fresno St. in Santa Cruz (Live
Oak district) called "Kong's Market" that has precisely what you're
describing. They have various egg rolls (not spring rolls) filled
with semiunidentifiable meats or veggies. *VERY* popular. I've
never found them on this side of the hill though.

Allan
--
Allan Schaffer al...@sgi.com
Silicon Graphics http://reality.sgi.com/allan

GeneK

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
They are. Traditionally, "egg rolls" were just that, fillings
wrapped up in thin omelets (hence the name) and then quickly
dipped in hot oil to seal them (I had an uncle who continued
to make them that way in his restaurant right up until he retired
in the late 80's). While the filling could, of course, be made
in advance, a complete omelet-wrapped "egg roll" could not, so
restaurants replaced the omelet with a flour-based wrapper.

"Spring rolls" are a different food altogether. When I was growing
up in the NYC area during the 50's, you could only get them during
the Spring Festival (Chinese New Year), hence that name.

Gene

swe...@scruznet.com

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
Allan Schaffer <al...@southpark.engr.sgi.com> wrote:

> As for the egg rolls, this isn't much help, but there's a little
> corner market on the corner of 26th & Fresno St. in Santa Cruz (Live
> Oak district) called "Kong's Market" that has precisely what you're
> describing. They have various egg rolls (not spring rolls) filled
> with semiunidentifiable meats or veggies. *VERY* popular. I've
> never found them on this side of the hill though.

Kong's egg-rolls are exactly like the ones I used to get at 2nd Street
Deli in San Jose. The ones at 2nd street were made by third party
and distributed to many little liquor/deli/market-like places.
2nd Street Deli is no longer there, and I haven't found another
store that carries them recenty (in San Jose, or anywhere).

I'm a little amused to see Kong's Market mentioned here :-) I didn't
know they were that famous :-)

-sw

atwe...@my-deja.com

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
That's interesting. Maybe it's easier to make spring rolls than
eggrolls, and the Chinese restaurants here are too layed back and not
as creative as the chefs of Chinese restaurants in New York, or maybe
they're catering to the vegeterian desires of Californians. Maybe a
combination of both. How annoying though. If that place in Santa Cruz
mentioned in this thread doesn't have what I'm looking for, I'll either
have to live with Jack in the Box eggrolls with my own duck sauce or
hoison sauce that I'll carry with me, or I'll seriously consider
getting regular shipments from that place in Queens I brought back a
few dozen last time and fried myself, or I'll try to make them myself,
but I'm sure they won't come out the same sinec it's probably takes a
lot of practice and culinary skills to get it exactly right, so I'd
like to leave that up to the experts in New York.

This is trully one of the biggest dissapointments about California,
besides the fact that last call is 1:30 am, and the Indian casino's
here (well, I'm not big into gambling, but still) are not allowed to
use Vegas-style slots, and even though I'm not a smoker, the lack of
smoking in bars and clubs has really changed the crowds. Who knows,
maybe the latter is for the better, at least health-wise, but who cares
about health when you're trying to meet people. And the lack of
biales, but that's ok because the bagels aren't too bad here, and I
have found good new york style pizza restaurants and decent philly
cheese steaks, so the only thing really missing is eggrolls. Hey,
maybe I should open a store that just sells these type of eggrolls.
You guys would buy them, no? I'm sure there would be quite a few
customers that miss them and are living with the jack in the box
eggrolls for now. I also know people that never tried new york style
eggrolls, and enjoy jack in the box eggrolls and once I introduced them
to new york style eggrolls that I brought back, they fell in love with
them instantly, as I expected.

And in New York, you are right, they do understand the distinction
between spring rolls and eggrolls, and will make a point to correct if
you indicate the wrong one on their menu. Here, spring rolls =
eggrolls, which is ridiculously untrue in my book.

-Andrew

In article <3867B3F8.12FADA0A@genek_hates_spammers.com>,

Matt Ackeret

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
In article <8489m7$ib...@fido.engr.sgi.com>,

Allan Schaffer <al...@southpark.engr.sgi.com> wrote:
>atwe...@my-deja.com said..
>> [egg rolls w/ duck sauce]
>
>This thread came around about a year ago, you might check the
>deja.com archives to see if there were any finds in the area. One
>thing I vaguely remember is that what's known on the east coast as
>'duck sauce' is sold in supermarkets as 'hoisin sauce' out here.

I believe Hoisin sauce is also known as plum sauce.. I certainly have seen
plum sauce (which you use on mu shu pork) in grocery stores too.

Since people are complaining, why do they only give you 4 pancakes (*)
with mu shu pork? Sheesh, like these things cost more than a few cents apiece.

(*) Seems like the last few years some restaurants are giving out regular
flour tortillas for mu shu pork! Sacrilige!
--
mat...@area.com

Matt Ackeret

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
In article <848q7v$qup$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>That's interesting. Maybe it's easier to make spring rolls than
>eggrolls, and the Chinese restaurants here are too layed back and not
>as creative as the chefs of Chinese restaurants in New York, or maybe
>they're catering to the vegeterian desires of Californians. Maybe a
>combination of both. How annoying though. If that place in Santa Cruz
>mentioned in this thread doesn't have what I'm looking for, I'll either
>have to live with Jack in the Box eggrolls with my own duck sauce or
>hoison sauce that I'll carry with me, or I'll seriously consider

Well, again, I still don't see how you can tell a difference between the things
you get at Jack in the Box and the ones from Costco. Heck, I wouldn't be
surprised if they came from the same manufacturer.
--
mat...@area.com

Allan Schaffer

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
atwe...@my-deja.com said..

>That's interesting. Maybe it's easier to make spring rolls than
>eggrolls, and the Chinese restaurants here are too layed back and not
>as creative as the chefs of Chinese restaurants in New York, or maybe
>they're catering to the vegeterian desires of Californians. Maybe a
>combination of both. How annoying though. If that place in Santa Cruz

So..
Was this entire thread meant to be a troll, or just this post?

Michael Wise

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
In article <848q7v$qup$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, atwe...@my-deja.com wrote:

> That's interesting. Maybe it's easier to make spring rolls than
> eggrolls, and the Chinese restaurants here are too layed back and not
> as creative as the chefs of Chinese restaurants in New York,


No they just serve food which is more Chinese than the stuff in NYC.
With almost 1/3 of the SF population being Chinese...and almost half of
them foreign born...the food here tends to be closer to the real deal
than the anglicized fixings on Mott.

> or maybe
> they're catering to the vegeterian desires of Californians. Maybe a
> combination of both. How annoying though. If that place in Santa Cruz

> mentioned in this thread doesn't have what I'm looking for, I'll either
> have to live with Jack in the Box eggrolls with my own duck sauce or
> hoison sauce that I'll carry with me, or I'll seriously consider

> getting regular shipments from that place in Queens I brought back a
> few dozen last time and fried myself, or I'll try to make them myself,
> but I'm sure they won't come out the same sinec it's probably takes a
> lot of practice and culinary skills to get it exactly right, so I'd
> like to leave that up to the experts in New York.
>
> This is trully one of the biggest dissapointments about California,
> besides the fact that last call is 1:30 am, and the Indian casino's
> here (well, I'm not big into gambling, but still) are not allowed to
> use Vegas-style slots, and even though I'm not a smoker, the lack of
> smoking in bars and clubs has really changed the crowds. Who knows,
> maybe the latter is for the better, at least health-wise, but who cares
> about health when you're trying to meet people. And the lack of
> biales, but that's ok because the bagels aren't too bad here, and I
> have found good new york style pizza restaurants and decent philly
> cheese steaks, so the only thing really missing is eggrolls.

Perhaps you can open a restuarant and sell REAL egg rolls as you
suggest. While you're at it, you could sell REAL chop suey too. Then,
I'll move to NY and open up a pizza joint which served REAL pizzas (with
Canadian bacon and pineapple).

--Mike

Jon Nadelberg

unread,
Dec 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/27/99
to
They are pretty good. They also have a good italian sub, too.


Jeff Gostin wrote:
>
> atwe...@my-deja.com wrote:
> : 2. Giovanni's in Sunnyvale. They also have excellent cheese steak hoagies
> : (get the hoagie, not the regular cheese steak).
>
> Hmmm. Ok, you've piqued my interest. I'm a native Philadelphian, so
> naturally, the cry of "excellent cheese steak hoagies" is a call-to-arms.
> I'll head down there in the next week or so and see what's what.
>
> BTW, my favorite cheese steak place out here thus far is "Jersey Joes" (see
> www.jerseyjoes.com for locations). Good meat, good rolls (real italian
> sandwich rolls, though not Amoroso), and friendly staff. Oh, and for those
> who need a Fix, they also have TastyKakes. :)
>
> ObDisclaimer: I have no connection with them other than as a satisfied
> customer.
>
> Thanks for the pointer!
>
> --J


--
jo...@pacbell.net
See 1970s Disneyland
http://home.pacbell.net/jonvn

Allan Schaffer

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
mat...@vax.area.com (Matt Ackeret) said..

>Allan Schaffer <al...@southpark.engr.sgi.com> wrote:
>>This thread came around about a year ago, you might check the
>>deja.com archives to see if there were any finds in the area. One
>>thing I vaguely remember is that what's known on the east coast as
>>'duck sauce' is sold in supermarkets as 'hoisin sauce' out here.
>
>I believe Hoisin sauce is also known as plum sauce.. I certainly have seen

No, what I said is correct.

Hoisin sauce (aka Duck Sauce) is not as sweet, and is much saltier
than Plum sauce. In the grand scale of Chinese sauces, it's closer
to Kung Pao sauce than Plum sauce. Other than that it's hard to
describe. You put it on Egg Rolls back east. :-) If you've never
had it you'll just have to try some.

Dr. Gee

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
[snip]

Don't know where you can find NY style egg rolls (like the other poster said,
"egg rolls" are suppoed to be made with egg, not flour originally. egg rolls
also refer to a pastry (sweet)). Spring rolls are usually served them in
spring time from Chinese new year & "tomb sweeping day" (in April).

but the duck sauce you're looking for maybe is called Hoisin sauce or plum
sauce. You should be able to find jars in any oriental grocery stores.
so you may need to try each out to find.

good luck. it's not too hard to make it yourself tho.

pam @ home
my real email: "phkung at ix dot netcom dot com"
----------
USDA zone 9, Sunset zone 15
My all spammers & telemarketers have no burial places. :)
Axum is a sorry piece of software.
----------

dke...@best.com

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
In article <848vbo$sg2$1...@nntp8.atl.mindspring.net>,

Dr. Gee <phk...@ix.netcom.com.REMOVE.THIS.TO.REPLY.COM> wrote:
>
>but the duck sauce you're looking for maybe is called Hoisin sauce or plum
>sauce. You should be able to find jars in any oriental grocery stores.
>so you may need to try each out to find.

Really? I don't think I've ever seen anything that color
orange in a Chinese restaurant since I moved here from
the east coast. I don't think duck sauce and Hoisin sauce
are the same thing.


--
Dave Eisen Sequoia Peripherals: (408) 752-1400
dke...@netcom.com FAX: (408) 752-2707
In our society, you can state your views, but they have to be correct.
--- Ernie Hai, coordinator Singapore Gov't Internet Project.

s...@bob.eecs.berkeley.edu

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
Matt Ackeret <mat...@vax.area.com> wrote:

> Since people are complaining, why do they only give you 4
> pancakes (*) with mu shu pork? Sheesh, like these things cost
> more than a few cents apiece.

In my experience they (by that I mean, your typical Chinese
restaurant) will happily give you additional pancakes at
no upcharge, if you merely ask...

S.

dke...@best.com

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to

And my experience is that they usually quote a price for
additional pancakes on the menu.

Valerie Stark

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
In article <8463lq$u8$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>
>Thankfully I have found a few New York style pizza restaurants around
>here, but still on the hunt for decent biales at bagel stores.

Where????


Val;

atwe...@my-deja.com

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
The only thing that concerns me in your reply is when you refer to
those eggrolls havine "semiunidentifiable." I did call that place up
and the guy working there said he does have pork eggrolls, but he
didn't understand when I asked him if it was little cubes of pork, and
not strips of pork, and if it also had vegetables. He made it sound
like the pork eggrolls are just filled with pork and nothing else, but
I somehow doubt that. In any case, I'll definitely check that place
out next time I hit the beach. Thanks for the tip! Now if these are
what I'm looking for, that guy better be prepared to expand his
business to accomodate my eggroll needs. I already asked him about
getting a dozen or so just in case and he said he'd be able to, but I
have to call in advance (similar to trying to get biales, even in NY).
In Queens, NY, when I got a couple dozen eggrolls to bring back here,
they easily accomodated my demands with an abundant supply of
eggrolls. When I asked how many I could get, they answered the right
way: "How many do you want?" Can't beat that! And these were
outstanding eggrolls. I say to hell with "authentic" eggrolls here!
Those who give me that crap, why don't you read some of the other
replies to this thread explaining the history and distinction between
spring rolls and eggrolls. Maybe you can learn a lesson or two.
Spring rolls, as is implied in the name, was meant to be served in the
spring time. I suppose maybe the Chinese immigrants got complacent
with the perpetual-like spring weather here in the CA and decided that
spring rolls would be ok all-year round, but the failed to realize that
there would be plenty of transplants arriving from the east coast
expecting real eggrolls. So from what I gather from previous replies,
and correct me if I'm wrong, but eggrolls (not spring rolls) are not an
americanized creation, but does exist in areas of China. If that's the
case as I've seen in earlier replies, I don't want to hear any more
crap from you so-called experts on "authentic" chinese cuisine.

And please don't tell me about pineapple or chicken on pizza. That's
completely sacreligious and completely unorthadox, but I suppose
whatever makes you happy, stick with it. I know whoever posted that
was trying to make a point and maybe push my buttons, but just in case
that person was serious. In any case, I can tell you, that I am very
unhappy without my New York eggrolls sometimes, and I hope to God that
that place in Santa Cruz has what I'm looking for, otherwise I will
have to ask my brother to start sending me monthly shipments from new
york and keep them in my freezer, and fry them myself as I have in the
past. Maybe I'll get that vacuum zip-lock sealer to preserve them
better and for longer periods of time. You're all welcome to come over
to my next open-house party when I get them for those of you craving
for some real eggrolls.

Thank God Thai, Vietnamese, and Cambodian restaurants make up for the
lack of certain items at Chinese restaurants, and the overall quality
of Chinese restaurants in this area. Which BTW, also includes poor
wonton soup (only Tien Fu in Mountain View really has somewhat decent
wonton soup). The dim sum is decent here, so that's good, but New York
has plenty of superb dim sum, and more exotic dim sum than what I've
seen here, so nothing unique there. So far, I am very unimpressed with
Chinese restaurants in this area. I'm not giving up though. My quest
is not over yet. Maybe I'll learn to enjoy varying Chinese cuisines
such as authentic hong kong style chinese food which I had recently in
Vegas at this place called the Noodle House in Mandalay Bay, which was
really amazing. I'd like to find a place similar to that here. Maybe
Food Street on Castro St. in mountain view comes somewhat close, but
still not as good as what I had in Vegas.

-Andrew


In article <8489m7$ib...@fido.engr.sgi.com>,


al...@southpark.engr.sgi.com (Allan Schaffer) wrote:
> atwe...@my-deja.com said..
> > [egg rolls w/ duck sauce]
>

> This thread came around about a year ago, you might check the
> deja.com archives to see if there were any finds in the area. One
> thing I vaguely remember is that what's known on the east coast as
> 'duck sauce' is sold in supermarkets as 'hoisin sauce' out here.
>

> As for the egg rolls, this isn't much help, but there's a little
> corner market on the corner of 26th & Fresno St. in Santa Cruz (Live
> Oak district) called "Kong's Market" that has precisely what you're
> describing. They have various egg rolls (not spring rolls) filled
> with semiunidentifiable meats or veggies. *VERY* popular. I've
> never found them on this side of the hill though.
>

> Allan
> --
> Allan Schaffer
al...@sgi.com
> Silicon Graphics
http://reality.sgi.com/allan
>

atwe...@my-deja.com

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
1. Vito's in Sunnyvale (not entirely consistent, but if you get there
when the pies are fresh, you're in luck, so get there as early exactly
when the rush begins, around 11:50-12:15. Same goes with any pizza
store, esp. the ones around here. Consistency is definitely somewhat
of an issue). You'll be happy to know they also make sicilian pies,
but haven't tried them there yet, and they do allow you to be extra-
large pies, which are the pies that they use for their slices. Very
few places, even in New York let you do that. This place is on Reed
and Lawrence.

2. Giovanni's in Sunnyvale. They also have excellent cheese steak

hoagies (get the hoagie, not the regular cheese steak). Also, they
serve sicilian pies. They're on Lawrence, just north of 101 in that
strip mall with the Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants, and near a
couple of gas stations.

3. Pronto's Pizza in Sunnyvale. Excellent. They're at Fremont St. &
Mary St., next to the grocery store.

4. Pinnochio (I may have gotten the spelling wrong there). There are
two of these in Gilroy. The better one is closer to the Monterey st.
exit off of 101. Definitely try the garlic slices there, esp. since
it's in Gilroy!

Amazing that 3 out of 4 of these places are in Sunnyvale. Must be a
lot of old school NY/NJ folks out here that settled in Sunnyvale.
Sunnyvale is a nice place, as long as you don't live near power-lines
or near high tech businesses. Just a few cul de sacs are the only
refuge left really in Sunnyvale. Anyway, let's hear it for Sunnyvale
in a taste of NY pizza! Give them a try, and let me know what you
think. At least its the best we can do. I was really impressed with
Vito's, but as I said, you really need to get there when the pizza is
fresh, or order a whole pizza with a group to ensure freshness,
otherwise the consistency is slightly off, but no big deal. It's still
excellent. (If you decide to get a cheese steak sandwhich there, make
sure to ask for some hot sauce, but don't ask the old man there. He'll
say that they don't have any. Not sure why. Either he's going senile
or he's trying to promote just the pizza, which is fine with me.)

-Andrew


In article <94635406...@news.satanic.org>,

Will Borgeson

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
Someone needs to do something about this Bay Area conspiracy to annoy
folks from the East Coast by not providing precisely the style of
greaseball junk food they scarfed back home.

By the way, Steve W. - is "Kong's" the little market right there at
Pleasure Point? Thus far I've steered away from the greaseball junk food
they sell, but if it's that good, I might have to give it a try one of
these times.

We're quite fond of the "Chinese junk food" at the local Raley's. And,
they do haved that red dye #2 sweet/sour sauce in the little plastic
packs. However, their "egg rolls" are strictly veg. "Peking Pork" (bbq
pork chunks) isn't bad there, though.

Will

Lusty Wench

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
In article <849fu7$9mc$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>I say to hell with "authentic" eggrolls here!
>Those who give me that crap, why don't you read some of the other
>replies to this thread explaining the history and distinction between
>spring rolls and eggrolls. Maybe you can learn a lesson or two.
<snip>

>So from what I gather from previous replies,
>and correct me if I'm wrong, but eggrolls (not spring rolls) are not an
>americanized creation, but does exist in areas of China. If that's the
>case as I've seen in earlier replies, I don't want to hear any more
>crap from you so-called experts on "authentic" chinese cuisine.

With attitude like this, don't expect that people are going to try to
be helpful to you for much longer.

Lusty

GeneK

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
Hoisin and plum sauce are different. Hoisin is based on
soybeans, not plums. And I've never been charged extra
for more pancakes with my mu shu. I think they do it
because lots of people used to put the filling on their
rice and leave pancakes behind because they didn't know
what they were supposed to do with them :)

Gene


Matt Ackeret wrote:
>
> I believe Hoisin sauce is also known as plum sauce.. I certainly have seen

Tony Lima

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
On Sun, 26 Dec 1999 22:13:32 GMT, atwe...@my-deja.com
wrote:

>I am in desparate need of east coast style eggrolls. NOT spring
>rolls. There is a definite distinction, at least in New York City
>Chinese restaurants. I define an eggroll to have a thick shell (I

[snip]

All those in favor of reclassifying this post as yet another
in the ongoing series "[specific food] isn't as good here as
it was in [name of city]" please signify by clicking the
right mouse button now. (For those with rodentially
challenged machines, hit the spacebar once to vote.)

Thank you for participating. - Tony

Allan Schaffer

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
Will Borgeson <szbo...@sandman.ucdavis.edu> said..

>By the way, Steve W. - is "Kong's" the little market right there at
>Pleasure Point?

Not that far down. It's a neighborhood mini-market on 26th Avenue at
24th/Fresno St. About a half-mile from the part of East Cliff beach
accessable at the end of 26th.

Valerie Stark

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
In article <849hqb$arq$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>1. Vito's in Sunnyvale (not entirely consistent, but if you get there

Been there. Not impressed. I'll try the other two Sunnyvale places soon.

Thanks,


Valerie

GeneK

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
atwe...@my-deja.com wrote:
>
> I suppose maybe the Chinese immigrants got complacent
> with the perpetual-like spring weather here in the CA and decided that
> spring rolls would be ok all-year round, but the failed to realize that
> there would be plenty of transplants arriving from the east coast
> expecting real eggrolls. So from what I gather from previous replies,

> and correct me if I'm wrong, but eggrolls (not spring rolls) are not an
> americanized creation, but does exist in areas of China. If that's the
> case as I've seen in earlier replies, I don't want to hear any more
> crap from you so-called experts on "authentic" chinese cuisine.

More likely they based what they sell on what their customers wanted,
and there aren't enough "transplants" to justify the time and effort.
Having spent a fair amount of time in my relatives' restaurant
kitchens as a kid, I can tell you that we often laughed at the stuff
that could be served to (non-Chinese) New Yorkers under the guise of
"Chinese food." Bay area diners are *much* more sophisticated, and
many restaurants here don't even bother to keep separate menus for
Chinese and non-Chinese customers. Unlike NYC, where those little
"post-its" in Chinese often advertise dishes not offered to non-
Chinese customers because the proprietors know they "won't like it,"
in the majority of restaurants I frequent here, they're pretty much
the same as the printed English menu (I know one fellow who puts them
up just for atmosphere, so non-Chinese will assume the place must be
good "because Chinese people eat there").

> Maybe I'll get that vacuum zip-lock sealer to preserve them
> better and for longer periods of time. You're all welcome to come over
> to my next open-house party when I get them for those of you craving
> for some real eggrolls.

Why don't you just make them yourself? all the necessary ingredients
are readily available, they go together pretty much the way they look
when you eat 'em, and unlike bagels and pizza, which require expensive
equipment to cook, all you need is a stove, a pot and a bottle of oil.
Or you could get the frozen "LaChoy" ones from the freezer section,
which pretty closely resemble the junk that used to pass for "egg rolls"
in the 50's and 60's in the burbs outside of NYC Chinatown...

Gene

GeneK

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
I used to like Pronto's when I lived right near the place, ask for extra
cheese, olive oil and garlic, didn't used to be on the menu, but it was
the closest to a "NY pizza" I ever found. Unfortunately, I moved, and
it turns into a lump of goo if you have to drive it any distance. So
unless you happen to live right around the corner, eat it there.

BTW, last time I was back in NY, the pizza *there* wasn't as good as I
remembered it. Nostalgia is a powerful hallucinogen :)

Gene

GeneK

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
Hey, I buy "authentic Chinese cuisine" at Albertson's...
(in the do-it-yourself kit) :)

Gene


bizbee wrote:
>
> Of course, on the other hand, since you seem outraged that you can't
> purchase authentic Chinese cuisine at <Albertson's>, we'll just let
> that go.

atwe...@my-deja.com

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
I think you may like Pronto's then. But definitely give both others a
try. Giovanni's is good, but the sauce may not be quite as good as
Pronto's. And Pronto's has less of that silicon valley lunch dive look
to it, and more of a nice, small, little pizza parlor with good food
and a younger crowd, so has more of an authentic look & feel to it, but
of course give both a try and let me know what you think. And when you
pass by Gilroy next time, give that one down there a try. And when I
refer to garlic slices there, I'm referring to roasted garlic clove
pieces on the slice of course.

-Andrew

In article <94640355...@news.satanic.org>,


vst...@cyberNOTHING.org (Valerie Stark) wrote:
> In article <849hqb$arq$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com>
wrote:
> >1. Vito's in Sunnyvale (not entirely consistent, but if you get there
>

> Been there. Not impressed. I'll try the other two Sunnyvale places
soon.
>

Michael Wise

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
In article <3869fdf0...@nntp.ix.netcom.com>, tub...@ix.netcom.com
(bizbee) wrote:


> >Not even close! I've tried that crap already. The skin may be similar,
> >but that's about it. And like you said, they only have the chicken
> >ones, and not pork. A real meat eggroll has pork, not chicken.
>
> Just a guess, but I'd venture to say that this is why it's called a
> <chicken> eggroll and not a <pork> or <shrimp> eggroll....
>
> Not to dredge up the same old story, but why is it that people from
> NYC think that they have set the standard for how all food should be
> made?


Don't you know? Not only is NYC the only place you can find REAL and
AUTHENTIC Chinese food...even though the Chinese community in SF is much
larger with huge ethnic enclaves throughout SF...but NYC is also the
only place one can find REAL and AUTHENTIC San Francisco sour dough
bread...not like the crap we have in San Francisco. ; )

--Mike

Todd Michel McComb

unread,
Dec 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/28/99
to
In article <84bkp1$1uai9$1...@rn.area.com>,
Matt Ackeret <mat...@vax.area.com> wrote:
>good, so I _was_ right that duck, Hoisin, and plum sauces are at least
>_similar_ if not identical.

No, the New York "duck" sauce is an orange color and sort of "gummy".
I didn't care for it one bit, so can't give a real taste test
result. My offhand guess is it's gelatin based. It's not a dark
sauce.


Matt Ackeret

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
In article <849hqb$arq$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>Amazing that 3 out of 4 of these places are in Sunnyvale. Must be a
>lot of old school NY/NJ folks out here that settled in Sunnyvale.
>Sunnyvale is a nice place, as long as you don't live near power-lines
>or near high tech businesses. Just a few cul de sacs are the only

What is wrong with high tech businesses?

What scientific proof do you have that power lines cause any problems?

Mostly I'm arguing for the sake of arguing, but hey, you're attacking
Sunnyvale!
--
mat...@area.com

Matt Ackeret

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
In article <848vbo$sg2$1...@nntp8.atl.mindspring.net>,
Dr. Gee <phk...@ix.netcom.com.REMOVE.THIS.TO.REPLY.COM> wrote:
>but the duck sauce you're looking for maybe is called Hoisin sauce or plum
>sauce. You should be able to find jars in any oriental grocery stores.

good, so I _was_ right that duck, Hoisin, and plum sauces are at least
_similar_ if not identical. (Someone, maybe the originator of the thread,
snidely replied to my previous suggestion that it might be the same thing..
and I admitted I wasn't sure.)
--
mat...@area.com

Matt Ackeret

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
In article <849fu7$9mc$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, <atwe...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>way: "How many do you want?" Can't beat that! And these were
>outstanding eggrolls. I say to hell with "authentic" eggrolls here!

>Those who give me that crap, why don't you read some of the other
>replies to this thread explaining the history and distinction between
>spring rolls and eggrolls. Maybe you can learn a lesson or two.

I've never been 'giving you that crap'. I still am mostly mystified at
what you are actually looking for, when you say that Jack in the Box
eggrolls are closest to what you're looking for.. I've given several examples
of frozen eggrolls that you can buy that are basically _identical_ to
Jack in the Box eggrolls, and you claim that they're not.

>And please don't tell me about pineapple or chicken on pizza. That's

Mmmmm... pineapple and sausage pizza... (yes, I know it's not the usual
Hawaiian combination of Canadian bacon and pineapple.. but I dislike
Canadian bacon enough that it mostly outweighs the goodness of the pineapple).

BTW, have you TRIED pineapple on pizza? If you like pineapple at all, I think
you'll like it after you try it. I thought it was gross before I tried it,
and now sausage & pineapple is my favorite pizza.

Chicken -- I've had barbequeued chicken pizza a few times. Sometimes they
use barbequeue sauce instead of the tomato sauce. Can be pretty good.
--
mat...@area.com

Allan Schaffer

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
mat...@vax.area.com (Matt Ackeret) said..

>In article <848vbo$sg2$1...@nntp8.atl.mindspring.net>,
>Dr. Gee <phk...@ix.netcom.com.REMOVE.THIS.TO.REPLY.COM> wrote:
>>but the duck sauce you're looking for maybe is called Hoisin sauce or plum
>>sauce. You should be able to find jars in any oriental grocery stores.
>
>good, so I _was_ right that duck, Hoisin, and plum sauces are at least
>_similar_ if not identical.

Sorry but, .. still not correct. :-)
You've simply found someone else making the same error.

The difference between bottled Hoisin Sauce and bottled Plum sauce is
similar in concept to the difference between store-bought 'merican
BBQ sauce and Ketchup.

Hoisin sauce is made from soybean flour, chilies, red beans, and
other spices. Plum sauce is made from plums and spices. As with
Ketchup and BBQ sauce, you would be able to easily distinguish the
two in a taste test.

Really, this is not that difficult, mysterious, or controversial.
They're just two different things. They're both sauces, they're both
ethnic Chinese in origin, they're both dark in color, but as far as
taste goes, they're very different.

Animzmirot

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
Andrew,

You can get REAL NY style duck sauce at Kosher grocery stores. I know that
sounds strange, but it is true. I have a couple of HUGE bottles at home right
now, bought at Ventura Kosher in LA. It is the real thing, Golds Soo Moy Jung
Oriental Style Duck Sauce. Comes in regular and spicy garlic.

You CANNOT find NY style egg rolls. You can find fried wontons that have a
similar flavor but not the same shape. You're looking for Wok-n-Roll type egg
rolls.

You CANNOT find a decent Bialy. Don't even bother looking. Make your own. Get
Secrets of a Jewish Baker out of the library, or at your local bookshop, and
use that recipe. They're pretty good.

Animzmirot

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
>>
>>but the duck sauce you're looking for maybe is called Hoisin sauce or plum
>>sauce. You should be able to find jars in any oriental grocery stores.
>>so you may need to try each out to find.
>
>Really? I don't think I've ever seen anything that color
>orange in a Chinese restaurant since I moved here from
>the east coast. I don't think duck sauce and Hoisin sauce
>are the same thing.


They're not. Not even remotely close. Duck sauce is orange, made of peaches or
apricots. Hoisin sauce is either soybean or black bean paste based. They don't
look the same, they don't smell the same, and they don't taste the same. And
that's because they AREN'T the same!

Golds Duck Sauce. That's what you're looking for. Gold's Pure Food, Brooklyn
Road. Hempstead Village, NY 11550.

Animzmirot

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
> One
>thing I vaguely remember is that what's known on the east coast as
>'duck sauce' is sold in supermarkets as 'hoisin sauce' out here.
>
Oh no, not even CLOSE. Duck sauce in the east is a golden colored sweet sauce
made with peaches or apricots, sugar, vinegar, salt, paprika and other spices.
They don't have it here in the bay area. In the east it is sold in
supermarkets. It is really called Duck Sauce. It isn't even remotely close to
hoisin sauce, which is black bean based, I believe.
>
>

Charlotte L. Blackmer

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
In article <84a0ej$mnv$1...@mark.ucdavis.edu>,

Will Borgeson <szbo...@sandman.ucdavis.edu> wrote:
>Someone needs to do something about this Bay Area conspiracy to annoy
>folks from the East Coast by not providing precisely the style of
>greaseball junk food they scarfed back home.

www.united.com (or is it ual.com? I got annoyed at them when they
came this close to totally screwing up my southern vacation and haven't
looked recently)
www.americanair.com
www.usairways.com
www.southwest.com (now that they're flying to Lawn Guyland)

www.ups.com
www.fedex.com
www.usps.gov

I suspect there might be something at www.dot.gov (like a map of I-80,
which goes both ways as far as I can tell).

Is this a great country or what???? ;-) ;-) ;-) ;-) ;-) ;-) ;-)

Tip for "On the whole, I'd rather eat junk food in Philadephia" gang - I
saw Tastykakes at my Safeway. I shop at the one on north Shattuck Avenue
in Berkeley.

>We're quite fond of the "Chinese junk food" at the local Raley's. And,
>they do haved that red dye #2 sweet/sour sauce in the little plastic
>packs. However, their "egg rolls" are strictly veg. "Peking Pork" (bbq
>pork chunks) isn't bad there, though.

Raley's a is a good market. I grew up in Sacramenna and mildly miss
having one close; driving to El Sobrante from Berkeley to buy groceries
is a bit silly IMO. There are good markets in Berkeley, of course, but I
tend to shop at more places to reproduce the value/quality combo.

Most of the eggrolls I've encountered are vegi, but restaurants out here
are sensitive to the fact that a non-trivial fraction of their target
audience are vegetarians or trying to "cut back". (Or really like lumpia,
*grin*.)

A fair number of potstickers (or dumplings as they are known in NYC - I
remember this as the subject of a previous Weinstein rant) are made with
chicken not pork since pork seems to be a dirty word to a lot of folks.

obBa.Food: Vegi Food, Berkeley - best meatless pot stickers around, and
the sweet-and-sour fried walnuts is to drool for. And I as a rule don't
like most Chinese places "sweet and sour". NOT like anything else in the
realm of Chinese food I've had.

CLB
------------------------------------------------------
Charlotte L. Blackmer http://www.rahul.net/clb
Bear Flag Republic Green Card Committee
Junk (esp. commercial) email review rates: $250 US ea

Karen

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to

Pearl River in South San Jose has a pretty good replica.
--
Karen
WWAFD?
fra...@ix.netcom.com

Mark Mellin

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
In article <n1rh6s0tiuq1pdtgo...@4ax.com>,
Tony...@ms.spacebbs.com wrote:

Wasn't there a ba.food song recently posted about this?

Save for Mr. Wise's humorous satire, which was somehow ignored by the
would be savvy poster previously from New York City ("Come on, Come on,
Come on Kitty..."), this thread should be probably be followed up to
rec.food.recipes.from.my.home.town. Personally, I'd still love to know
how to make Huevos Rancheros a la *bertos. (<-- Generic name for Mexican
fast food places in San Diego).

OBbafood: The new Spengers in Berkeley is suffering from its
popularity and a non union staff. The reservation, kitchen, and wait
staff seem quite overwhelmed with the number of diners wishing to give the
new restaurant a try. The "Captain's Plate", a fried^W"pan sauteed" sea
food sampler now costs $20. It still comes with cole slaw and french
fries. The non union wait staff, while more pleasant than their more
efficient predecessors, are really rather inept and unprofessional by
comparison. We found the fresh fish to be rather on the salty side (some
sort of preservative perhaps?), and the service more or less abysmal.
Here's hoping they can get their act together soon.

-----------
Mark Mellin Precita Valley, CA 94110-5206 USA
mel...@hooked.net

Natarajan Krishnaswami

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
On 29 Dec 1999 00:31:29 GMT, Matt Ackeret <mat...@vax.area.com> wrote:
> good, so I _was_ right that duck, Hoisin, and plum sauces are at least
> _similar_ if not identical. (Someone, maybe the originator of the thread,
> snidely replied to my previous suggestion that it might be the same thing..
> and I admitted I wasn't sure.)

Sort of: in my observation, [what is usually marketed as] duck sauce
and plum sauce are the same: a peach-colored, transparent, sweet
sauce. Hoisin sauce is completely different: a reddish-brown, opaque,
salty-sweet paste made from beans and garlic, made without plums. I
would suspect that the term "duck sauce" has a much more malleable
usage than "hoisin sauce" or "plum sauce".


<N/>
--
you have been evaluated. you have a negative reference count. prepare
to be garbage collected. persistence is futile.
-- Erik Naggum

swe...@scruznet.com

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
Will Borgeson <szbo...@sandman.ucdavis.edu> wrote:

> By the way, Steve W. - is "Kong's" the little market right there at

> Pleasure Point? Thus far I've steered away from the greaseball junk food
> they sell, but if it's that good, I might have to give it a try one of
> these times.

I pass it all the time, but I just can't picture the intersection.
I'd say that yes, its pleasure point, about a mile from from the mall.

It's in a residential neighboorhood, surrounded by mobile homes and
what were once one-story houses (going on two now; everybody trying
to get an "ocean view" - until your neighbor adds another story to
their house, too!)

It looks like a dilapidated liquor store/market. Eggrolls are
prominently advertised on the outside of the building.

And there's a Jack 'n The Box on the way home, too, if the original poster
walks away from Kongs disappointed.

The weather has been great here in scruz. It's one of the few times
of the year we have the weather without the obnoxious bottle-smashing
"tourists" from the other side of the hill. ;-) Good waves lately, too, but
you knew that.

-sw

swe...@scruznet.com

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
atwe...@my-deja.com wrote:

> And when I refer to garlic slices there, I'm referring to roasted
> garlic clove pieces on the slice of course.

I _spit_ on roasted garlic. Fresh pressed garlic is the only
way to go when topping a pizza. I usually order my pie with extra,
extra garlic, but I hate having to pay $3.00 extra for just garlic.

Last time I lived back "East" (two years ago), I couldn't
even find garlic as an option, anywhere. How sad.

-sw

swe...@scruznet.com

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
Matt Ackeret <mat...@vax.area.com> wrote:

> Mostly I'm arguing for the sake of arguing, but hey, you're attacking
> Sunnyvale!

You're referring to the area South of the railroad tracks, right? :-)

-sw (Fremont High - Class of '84 (I think))

Brett Person

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
Todd Michel McComb <mcc...@medieval.org> wrote:
: In article <84bkp1$1uai9$1...@rn.area.com>,

: Matt Ackeret <mat...@vax.area.com> wrote:
:>good, so I _was_ right that duck, Hoisin, and plum sauces are at least
:>_similar_ if not identical.

: No, the New York "duck" sauce is an orange color and sort of "gummy".


: I didn't care for it one bit, so can't give a real taste test
: result. My offhand guess is it's gelatin based. It's not a dark
: sauce.

SO is the duck sauce in the upper mid-west. Let me also add that the
first Chineese meal I had in the bay area was way different ( better) than what I
have had in fargo. Fargo must have more Chineese restaurants than any other kind.
I can think of maybe ten off the top of my head. For a midsized town like Fargo,
thats a lot of Chineee food. They all pretty much suck, too.

Of course, most of the ones Ieat at are the buffet type. They start out
great and then degrade as management gets cheaper about things.
--


Brett G. Person
Slackware Linux Project
per...@www.slackware.com

Todd Michel McComb

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
In article <386ad181$0$2...@nntp1.ba.best.com>,
Jo Ann Malina <jma...@spamthis.com> wrote:
>I got a package of frozen pork buns at the supermarket on Castro
>Street in downtown Mountain View this week. They are ok, not great

Go around the corner on Dana St. to Full House and buy theirs.
That's what they sold (that and potstickers) before they opened a
restaurant.

>Is Albertson's any better?

Our local Lucky is no better. I won't hold my breath.


Roberta L. Millstein

unread,
Dec 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/29/99
to
In article <386865bb$0$2...@nntp1.ba.best.com>, Jeff Gostin
<jgo...@shell2.ba.best.com> wrote:

> BTW, my favorite cheese steak place out here thus far is "Jersey Joes"
> (see
> www.jerseyjoes.com for locations). Good meat, good rolls (real italian
> sandwich rolls, though not Amoroso), and friendly staff.

Ick, you're kidding, right? I went to the Jersey Joe's on DeAnza once,
and it was disgusting. The cheese was tasteless and runny (actually,
the whole sandwich was tasteless), and the meat was poor quality. I
don't remember the rolls, because the rest was so unappealing.

Roberta
--
Roberta L. Millstein
rlmil...@spamaway.rlm.net

Remove "spamaway" to reply

i...@svpal.org

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99
to
In article <84apaa$1ka$1...@idiom.com>,
Lusty Wench <lu...@lusty.org> wrote:

[SNIP]

> With attitude like this, don't expect that people are going to try to
> be helpful to you for much longer.
>
> Lusty

Whattaya want?
He's from Noo Yawk fer cryin' out loud.
Youse were expecting maybe gratitude.

IBM

--
#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#--#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#-#
In their wisdom, the Founding Fathers chose to
limit the powers afforded to government.
Government now wishes we would forget this.

Natarajan Krishnaswami

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99
to
On Wed, 29 Dec 1999 23:49:24 GMT, swe...@scruznet.com <swe...@scruznet.com> wrote:
> Last time I lived back "East" (two years ago), I couldn't
> even find garlic as an option, anywhere. How sad.

That IS sad. Where east did you live? Pizzas and calzones with
crushed or sliced garlic, ricotta, and spinach were staples of my
diet, when I didn't feel like cooking. This was in Poughkeepsie, so I
imagine it'd be pretty easy to find in NYC or Boston, too.

Jo Ann Malina

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99
to
mag...@rahul.net is alleged to have said:
> On Mon, 27 Dec 1999 08:19:20 GMT, atwe...@my-deja.com wrote:
>
>>a Chinese restaurant? (BTW, I'm really pissed that Albertsons
>>(previously known as Lucky), well at least the one I visit, only
>>carries microwavable chicken steamed buns, and no longer the pork
>>steamed buns.
>
> Try the dim-sum counters at the Ranch 99 supermarkets in Cupertino and Milpitas.
> They have the BBQ pork steamed buns, perhaps their egg rolls are the type you
> are looking for too.

I got a package of frozen pork buns at the supermarket on Castro Street

in downtown Mountain View this week. They are ok, not great; open at
the top instead of a closed sphere, and filled with little cubes of meat
'n stuff in bright red sauce. The label lists MSG, but I find I can eat
one without suffering the side effects. I'll have to try the Ranch 99
ones.

Trader Joe used to carry the chicken ones as char siu bao, which I also
liked, but they haven't had them for a long time. Maybe they have
resurfaced at Albertson's.

Speaking of Albertson's and Lucky, I gave up shopping at Lucky years
ago because their Palo Alto stores were so run down and dirty. Is
Albertson's any better?

--
Jo Ann Malina, make spamthis best to find my address
What some call health, if purchased by perpetual anxiety about diet,
isn't much better than tedious disease. -- George Dennison Prentice

Dr. Gee

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99
to
In article <19991229005140...@ng-fk1.aol.com>, animz...@aol.comspamfree (Animzmirot) wrote:
>
>They're not. Not even remotely close. Duck sauce is orange, made of peaches or
>apricots. Hoisin sauce is either soybean or black bean paste based. They don't
>look the same, they don't smell the same, and they don't taste the same. And
>that's because they AREN'T the same!
>
>Golds Duck Sauce. That's what you're looking for. Gold's Pure Food, Brooklyn
>Road. Hempstead Village, NY 11550.

So what they call "duck sauce" must be a truely a NYC invention. I know hoisin
sauce is sometimes called "duck sauce" cause it's seved with roast duck.

regards,

pam @ home
my real email: "phkung at ix dot netcom dot com"
----------
USDA zone 9, Sunset zone 15
My all spammers & telemarketers have no burial places. :)
Axum is a sorry piece of software.
----------

Natarajan Krishnaswami

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99
to
On Thu, 30 Dec 1999 03:17:20 GMT, Dr. Gee <phk...@ix.netcom.com.REMOVE.THIS.TO.REPLY.COM> wrote:
> So what they call "duck sauce" must be a truely a NYC invention.

I've seen it in Chinese restaurants around here, too.

Tony Lima

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99
to
On Wed, 29 Dec 1999 23:38:29 -0800, "Roberta L. Millstein"
<rlmil...@spamaway.rlm.net> wrote:

>In article <386865bb$0$2...@nntp1.ba.best.com>, Jeff Gostin
><jgo...@shell2.ba.best.com> wrote:
>
>> BTW, my favorite cheese steak place out here thus far is "Jersey Joes"
>> (see
>> www.jerseyjoes.com for locations). Good meat, good rolls (real italian
>> sandwich rolls, though not Amoroso), and friendly staff.
>
>Ick, you're kidding, right? I went to the Jersey Joe's on DeAnza once,
>and it was disgusting. The cheese was tasteless and runny (actually,
>the whole sandwich was tasteless), and the meat was poor quality. I
>don't remember the rolls, because the rest was so unappealing.

This is caused by a fundamental misunderstanding of the
cheesesteak experience. Remember, this "food" was invented
in Philadelphia and remains popular in that area of
Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey. You shouldn't expect
cheesesteaks to taste like California cuisine. - Tony (whose
wife is actually from Pennsylvania and assures him that
Jersey Joes cheesesteaks are about as close to the real
thing as you can get outside Philly)

Yip Yap

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99
to
In article <rlmillstein-38E5...@nntp.best.com>,

"Roberta L. Millstein" <rlmil...@spamaway.rlm.net> wrote:
> In article <386865bb$0$2...@nntp1.ba.best.com>, Jeff Gostin
> <jgo...@shell2.ba.best.com> wrote:
>
> > BTW, my favorite cheese steak place out here thus far is "Jersey
Joes"
> > (see
> > www.jerseyjoes.com for locations). Good meat, good rolls (real
italian
> > sandwich rolls, though not Amoroso), and friendly staff.
>
> Ick, you're kidding, right? I went to the Jersey Joe's on DeAnza
once,
> and it was disgusting.


I haven't had the cheese steak at Jersey Joe's, but the cold
hoagies are pretty darned good.

-- Yip

Patti Beadles

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99
to
Cheese Steak Shop, in a myriad of locations throughout the bay area.
They iport Amoroso's rolls. 'nuff said.

-Patti
--
Patti Beadles | Not just your average
pat...@netcom.com/pat...@gammon.com | degenerate gambling adrenaline
http://www.gammon.com/ | junkie software geek leatherbyke
or just yell, "Hey, Patti!" | nethead biker.

dke...@best.com

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99
to
In article <uutm6s084h4oc1j6u...@4ax.com>,
Tony Lima <Tony...@ms.spacebbs.com> wrote:
>On Wed, 29 Dec 1999 23:38:29 -0800, "Roberta L. Millstein"

><rlmil...@spamaway.rlm.net> wrote:
>
>>In article <386865bb$0$2...@nntp1.ba.best.com>, Jeff Gostin
>><jgo...@shell2.ba.best.com> wrote:
>>
>>> BTW, my favorite cheese steak place out here thus far is "Jersey Joes"
>>> (see
>>> www.jerseyjoes.com for locations). Good meat, good rolls (real italian
>>> sandwich rolls, though not Amoroso), and friendly staff.
>>
>>Ick, you're kidding, right? I went to the Jersey Joe's on DeAnza once,
>>and it was disgusting. The cheese was tasteless and runny (actually,
>>the whole sandwich was tasteless), and the meat was poor quality. I
>>don't remember the rolls, because the rest was so unappealing.
>
>This is caused by a fundamental misunderstanding of the
>cheesesteak experience. Remember, this "food" was invented
>in Philadelphia and remains popular in that area of
>Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey. You shouldn't expect
>cheesesteaks to taste like California cuisine. - Tony (whose
>wife is actually from Pennsylvania and assures him that
>Jersey Joes cheesesteaks are about as close to the real
>thing as you can get outside Philly)

I disagree. I'm from Philly. The cheesesteaks I've had
in the bay area have all been marginally edible at best.
It's not a matter of wanting Cal cuisine, it's a matter of
quality of ingredients and taking proper care of them.

I have not been to Jersey Joe's on DeAnza and can't comment
on the quality of their cheesesteak.


--
Dave Eisen Sequoia Peripherals: (408) 752-1400
dke...@netcom.com FAX: (408) 752-2707
In our society, you can state your views, but they have to be correct.
--- Ernie Hai, coordinator Singapore Gov't Internet Project.

Roberta L. Millstein

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99
to
In article <uutm6s084h4oc1j6u...@4ax.com>,
Tony...@ms.spacebbs.com wrote:

> On Wed, 29 Dec 1999 23:38:29 -0800, "Roberta L. Millstein"
> <rlmil...@spamaway.rlm.net> wrote:
>
> >Ick, you're kidding, right? I went to the Jersey Joe's on DeAnza once,
> >and it was disgusting. The cheese was tasteless and runny (actually,
> >the whole sandwich was tasteless), and the meat was poor quality. I
> >don't remember the rolls, because the rest was so unappealing.
>
> This is caused by a fundamental misunderstanding of the
> cheesesteak experience. Remember, this "food" was invented
> in Philadelphia and remains popular in that area of
> Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey. You shouldn't expect
> cheesesteaks to taste like California cuisine. - Tony (whose
> wife is actually from Pennsylvania and assures him that
> Jersey Joes cheesesteaks are about as close to the real
> thing as you can get outside Philly)

Ah, you make a faulty assumption. I am originally from New Jersey, not
California, and know what a good cheesesteak tastes like. I think your
wife is experiencing wishful thinking. Either that, or the DeAnza
Jersey Joe's is worse than the others.

Roberta L. Millstein

unread,
Dec 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/30/99