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Where is the best chili in Texas?

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Richard Lee

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May 25, 2002, 7:32:33 PM5/25/02
to
Hello. I'll be a first-time visitor to your state while attending the
Siggraph conference in San Antonio in July. I will be travelling
around the state outside of the conference dates. While I am currently
doing research on Texas, there is one foremost question on my mind.
As only the locals know best, I'd like to hear from you Texans where
you think the best chili is to be found in your state. Isn't it the de
facto official dish of Texas aside from a 4 pound longhorn steak (or
is that 6, hehehe)?

Now I realize "best" is a rather subject term, taste is personal and
even chili can have quite a variation. So maybe the question ought to
be who's serving an "interesting variation" of an old theme.

No your mom doesn't qualify unless she'll invite me. So name the
restaurants and I will thank you from the bottom of my fire-retardent
heart.

- Richard Lee (Toronto, Canada)

Jerry Davis

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May 25, 2002, 9:59:52 PM5/25/02
to
Don't restrict yourself to just hunting down chili. The real fightin'
words are over the best barbecue beef brisket ...........

grubber

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May 25, 2002, 10:12:30 PM5/25/02
to
"Richard Lee" <REMOVE_...@ibc.ca> wrote in message
news:3cf019b3.68758133@nntp...

I haven't been there in a while, but the Texas Chili Parlor on Lavaca in
Austin used to define 'chili' for me (back in the early 80's). After many
attempts, I figured out how to make a chili in their style, and then
improved it enough that I haven't needed to go back. I did go back a few
years ago and was disappointed at how greasy their chili was at that time.
It was still extremely good, but greasier than I remembered. Put it on your
short list.

But I agree with the other poster that forsaking bbq from Kreuz' or the Salt
Lick etc etc in your quest for the ultimate bowl of red will leave your life
unfulfilled.


Steve Wertz

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May 25, 2002, 10:15:53 PM5/25/02
to
Richard Lee wrote:
>
> Hello. I'll be a first-time visitor to your state while attending the
Uh-oh. Another crossposted Chili thread...

-sw

Terry Horton

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May 25, 2002, 11:03:39 PM5/25/02
to
On Sat, 25 May 2002 23:32:33 GMT, REMOVE_...@ibc.ca (Richard Lee)
wrote:

>Hello. I'll be a first-time visitor to your state while attending the
>Siggraph conference in San Antonio in July. I will be travelling
>around the state outside of the conference dates. While I am currently
>doing research on Texas, there is one foremost question on my mind.
>As only the locals know best, I'd like to hear from you Texans where
>you think the best chili is to be found in your state. Isn't it the de
>facto official dish of Texas aside from a 4 pound longhorn steak (or
>is that 6, hehehe)?

Whichever you choose make sure to ask for a "Frito pie". All chili
purveyors will know what of you speak.

But we indigenous peoples eat far more Tex-Mex food than plain chili,
more than any other restaurant fare for that matter. Chili when
served is most often seen as a sauce on enchiladas, tamales and the
like. Tex-Mex - yep, that's where I'd look for Texan food, and for
chili.

Richard Lee

unread,
May 26, 2002, 7:27:24 AM5/26/02
to
On Sun, 26 May 2002 02:12:30 GMT, "grubber" <madey...@swbell.net>
wrote:

>
>But I agree with the other poster that forsaking bbq from Kreuz' or the Salt
>Lick etc etc in your quest for the ultimate bowl of red will leave your life
>unfulfilled.

In which city are Kreuz and Salt Lick? Remember, I cross posted to
several .food and .eat groups of the major Texan cities.

- Richard Lee

Richard Lee

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May 26, 2002, 7:28:59 AM5/26/02
to
On Sun, 26 May 2002 02:15:53 GMT, Steve Wertz <swe...@texas.net>
wrote:

>Uh-oh. Another crossposted Chili thread...

Well, my apoligies if this subject has come up before. Being Texas, I
suppose it has from time to time. So is there an FAQ on this matter?

- Richard Lee

grubber

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May 26, 2002, 8:50:38 AM5/26/02
to
"Richard Lee" <REMOVE_...@ibc.ca> wrote in message
news:3cf0c466.112464364@nntp...

They're both 'outside' Austin. There was a loooong thread in the past week
on austin.food arguing about barbeque called "Q within easy driving
distance" (in which most agree that it is annoying to refer to the food in
question as "Q".) Research that thread for more detail.


Bill

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May 26, 2002, 9:13:03 AM5/26/02
to
That's like asking what is the one true path to salvation, or who is
the greatest Hockey Player of All time. You will never get a
definitive answer.

On Sat, 25 May 2002 23:32:33 GMT, REMOVE_...@ibc.ca (Richard Lee)
wrote:

>Hello. I'll be a first-time visitor to your state while attending the

Terry Horton

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May 26, 2002, 9:23:43 AM5/26/02
to
On Sun, 26 May 2002 08:13:03 -0500, Bill <Bi...@nowhere.net> wrote:

>That's like asking what is the one true path to salvation, or who is
>the greatest Hockey Player of All time. You will never get a
>definitive answer.

The chili hype approaches nauseating proportions. No one I know of
cares (unlike the BBQ and Mex food).

For Sale

unread,
May 26, 2002, 9:54:28 AM5/26/02
to
That's easy... and every Chili-cook in Texas will answer the same way... You find the best Chili in
Texas comes from the pot in which they cooked it themselves. Find a Chili Cook-Off!


MareCat

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May 26, 2002, 10:01:19 AM5/26/02
to
Richard Lee wrote:

> Isn't it the de facto official dish of Texas aside from a 4 pound longhorn steak (or
> is that 6, hehehe)?


Chili??? Try Tex-Mex or BBQ (brisket) instead.

BTW, the topic of where to find the best chili comes up in houston.eats
every once in awhile. Even though Houston is the largest city in the
state and boasts some 11,000 restaurants or so (of all different types
of cuisine), there are surprisingly very few places where one can go to
enjoy a good bowl o' red.

Mary

Terry Horton

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May 26, 2002, 11:08:26 AM5/26/02
to
On Sun, 26 May 2002 14:01:19 GMT, MareCat
<Nittany_Lio...@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Richard Lee wrote:
>
>> Isn't it the de facto official dish of Texas aside from a 4 pound longhorn steak (or
>> is that 6, hehehe)?
>
>Chili??? Try Tex-Mex or BBQ (brisket) instead.

Agreed. But for whatever value > 0 one might put on such decrees,
chili is the oh-fficial "state food". Another example of the
bull's-backside quality of output we've all come to expect from the
Texas legislature.

Frank Mancuso

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May 26, 2002, 11:14:32 AM5/26/02
to
You might search on Google/groups(this one), and another nice little
food site is chowhounds.com, and click on Texas. I, too would hit BBQ
instead of Chili-it's too hot to eat chili for one thing!

Albert Nurick

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May 26, 2002, 12:12:24 PM5/26/02
to
grubber wrote:
> I haven't been there in a while, but the Texas Chili Parlor on Lavaca
> in Austin used to define 'chili' for me (back in the early 80's).
> After many attempts, I figured out how to make a chili in their
> style, and then improved it enough that I haven't needed to go back.
> I did go back a few years ago and was disappointed at how greasy
> their chili was at that time. It was still extremely good, but
> greasier than I remembered. Put it on your short list.

I lived in Austin for 20 years (81-00) and I was always underwhelmed
with Texas Chili Parlor's chili. For me, Shady Grove on Barton
Springs (in Austin) had the best chili.

> But I agree with the other poster that forsaking bbq from Kreuz' or
> the Salt Lick etc etc in your quest for the ultimate bowl of red will
> leave your life unfulfilled.

Oh-oh. The "best BBQ" thread. Here we go...

--
Albert Nurick
alb...@nurick.com
www.nurick.com

Keith

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May 26, 2002, 12:43:34 PM5/26/02
to
On Sun, 26 May 2002 11:27:24 GMT, REMOVE_...@ibc.ca (Richard Lee)
wrote:

>On Sun, 26 May 2002 02:12:30 GMT, "grubber" <madey...@swbell.net>

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Here are a couple a "low an slow" links for you. Keith

Central Texas BBQ Dynasties
http://www.austinchronicle.com/issues/dispatch/2001-11-09/food_set.html

Texas BBQ from a Virginia perspective
http://www.velvitoil.com/Texas.htm

Sluggo the Flusher

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May 26, 2002, 12:58:38 PM5/26/02
to
Richard Lee wrote:

> In which city are Kreuz and Salt Lick? Remember, I cross posted to
> several .food and .eat groups of the major Texan cities.

The Salt Lick is in Driftwood. There is a map at their website,
<http://www.saltlickbbq.com/>. Rotate the map 90 degrees counter-clockwise
for correct orientation, though; I-35 runs north-south, not east-west ;).

Kreuz Market (my favorite) is in Lockhart, on Hwy 183 South. Again, you can
take a look at their website, <http://www.kreuzmarket.com/>. There's
supposed to be a map there, but you can't access it. There are, however,
some great photos of their food!


*slug*

Sluggo the Flusher

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May 26, 2002, 1:03:47 PM5/26/02
to
Sluggo the Flusher wrote:

> <http://www.kreuzmarket.com/>. There's
> supposed to be a map there, but you can't access it.

Ooops... You can access the map from the "Contact Us" page. The link on the
"Links" page is dead.


*slug*

Lawrence Person

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May 26, 2002, 2:13:33 PM5/26/02
to
In article <3cf0c466.112464364@nntp>, REMOVE_...@ibc.ca (Richard Lee)
wrote:

Kreuz Market is in Lockhart; The Salt Lick is in Driftwood. Both are south of
Austin.

--
Lawrence Person
lawre...@hiho.com (remove all "h"s from my e-mail address)
New web page now up at www.io.com/~lawrence

Steve Wertz

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May 26, 2002, 2:35:04 PM5/26/02
to
Richard Lee wrote:
>
> On Sun, 26 May 2002 02:15:53 GMT, Steve Wertz <swe...@texas.net>
> wrote:
>
> >Uh-oh. Another crossposted Chili thread...

> So is there an FAQ on this matter?

It states that Chili must be made with corn flour and eaten with Saltines.

-sw

Becca

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May 26, 2002, 3:32:36 PM5/26/02
to
> It states that Chili must be made with corn flour and eaten with Saltines.

No beans.

Chili is something we cook at home, it isn't something we buy.

Becca

Terry Horton

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May 26, 2002, 6:13:55 PM5/26/02
to

Neighbor, when was the last time you had a big thick steaming bowl of
Wolf Brand chili...

vonroach

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May 26, 2002, 6:36:22 PM5/26/02
to
On Sat, 25 May 2002 23:32:33 GMT, REMOVE_...@ibc.ca (Richard Lee)
wrote:

>- Richard Lee (Toronto, Canada)

Dicky, you ask a tenderfoot question. There is not even any fairly
close agreement on what chilli is. It really an old railroad recipe
for dressing up pretty bad meat to feed workers and passengers.
`Chilli' is `hot pepper' in Spanish so I guess you are using the short
form of Chilli con carne - meat flavored with peppers and spices. It
is a cold weather dish, now served any time of the year. Try some if
it tastes okay to you then you have your answer and can start on real
Texas cuisine - barbecue (BarBQ, Baebeque,...)

vonroach

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May 26, 2002, 6:42:03 PM5/26/02
to
On Sun, 26 May 2002 14:32:36 -0500, Becca <Be...@hal-pc.org> wrote:

It can be bought - canned or frozen.

Kelly Younger

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May 26, 2002, 7:29:28 PM5/26/02
to
Bill wrote:
>
> That's like asking what is the one true path to salvation, or who is
> the greatest Hockey Player of All time. You will never get a
> definitive answer.

God is infinite. So are the paths to God.

Wayne Gretzky.
--
Kelly Younger

Patrick L. Humphrey

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May 26, 2002, 8:17:31 PM5/26/02
to
Kelly Younger <kyou...@houston.rr.com> writes:

>Bill wrote:

>Wayne Gretzky.

-high stick upside the head-

Gordie Howe (who *did* spend four years as a Houston Aero)...and he got more
experience with chili here than The Great One ever did. :-)

--PLH, I'll go sit quietly in the box as long as Hard Times cafe comes back to
Houston ;-)

G Thurman

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May 27, 2002, 9:02:10 AM5/27/02
to

"Richard Lee" <REMOVE_...@ibc.ca> wrote in message
news:3cf0c466.112464364@nntp...
...

> In which city are Kreuz and Salt Lick? Remember, I cross posted to
> several .food and .eat groups of the major Texan cities.

yp.gte.net reveals:
Salt Lick B B Q
18001 Fm 1826, Driftwood, TX 78619
(512) 894-3117
map | driving directions | add to My Directory


G Thurman

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May 27, 2002, 9:10:40 AM5/27/02
to

"vonroach" <vonr...@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:3cf26146...@nntp.ix.netcom.com...

> On Sat, 25 May 2002 23:32:33 GMT, REMOVE_...@ibc.ca (Richard Lee)
> wrote:
>
> >- Richard Lee (Toronto, Canada)
>
> Dicky, you ask a tenderfoot question. .... It

> is a cold weather dish, now served any time of the year. Try some if
> it tastes okay to you then you have your answer and can start on real
> Texas cuisine - barbecue (BarBQ, Baebeque,...)

With the chili, ask for a couple 'long necks' to drink.

Then for the next four hours don't go >anywhere near< an open flame.


Richard Lee

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May 27, 2002, 9:26:54 AM5/27/02
to
On Sun, 26 May 2002 22:36:22 GMT, vonr...@ix.netcom.com (vonroach)
wrote:

>Dicky, you ask a tenderfoot question. There is not even any fairly

LOL. I did mention "best" is subject thus asking for personal
opinions.

>Texas cuisine - barbecue (BarBQ, Baebeque,...)

The concensus here seems to be that these amazing Texas barbeque beef
briskets are not to be missed. That's in addition to the 'red' and
'green' chili (the latter of which I never heard of before, thanks all
for enlightening me).

So are you going to reveal the locations of these barbeque beef
brisket places or am I just going to have to repost statewide under a
different subject? My travel route in Texas may even be swayed by
recommendations.

- Richard Lee


Scott Kurland

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May 27, 2002, 9:51:51 AM5/27/02
to
> > In which city are Kreuz and Salt Lick? Remember, I cross posted to
> > several .food and .eat groups of the major Texan cities.
>
> yp.gte.net reveals:
> Salt Lick B B Q
> 18001 Fm 1826, Driftwood, TX 78619
> (512) 894-3117

Just outside Austin.


Jerry Jungmann

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May 27, 2002, 11:34:50 AM5/27/02
to
>
> Chili is something we cook at home, it isn't something we buy.
>
> Becca

Actually, chili is a pretty popular menu item at restaurants that offer it.
It is particularly popular by the cup as an appetizer or as an accompaniment
to a sandwich.

Jerry


John Briscoe

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May 27, 2002, 12:20:35 PM5/27/02
to
Listen Dick,

How many ways can we tell you?

Salt Lick in Driftwood
Kreuz's in Lockhart

BTW, Central Texas is the capital of the Barbequed Beef Rib. For these,
please see the restaurants listed above.

Bill

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May 27, 2002, 12:44:20 PM5/27/02
to
And certainly not with spaghetti or macaroni as the blasphemers in
Cincinnati do.


On Sun, 26 May 2002 18:35:04 GMT, Steve Wertz <swe...@texas.net>

Becca

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May 27, 2002, 1:50:49 PM5/27/02
to
Jerry Jungmann wrote:

> Actually, chili is a pretty popular menu item at restaurants that offer it.

Good! After all of this chatter, we finally have an expert on
restaurants in Texas who serve chili. Please, enlighten us.

Becca

Pete Romfh

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May 27, 2002, 2:45:01 PM5/27/02
to

If your trip includes Houston let us know. Someone will guide you
to Williams Smokehouse for BBQ. Don't try this on your own,
remember, we're trained professionals. =;>

For Chile' Verde (green chile) I suggest Taqueria Arandas. It might
not be the "best", but it's darn good and you won't get killed trying
to find one. You should try it for breakfast. Huevos Ranchero
will let you try green chile, frejoles (refried beans), arroz mexicana
(mexican rice), and fresh tortillas as well as a couple of fried eggs.
That will get your day started and keep you going strong till supper.

For a "bowl-o-red", I'm open to discussion from the group, but you
might do better on that meal over San Antonio way.


--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amatuer Gourmet.
" If you hold a Unix shell up to your ear, can you hear the C? "

Jerry Jungmann

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May 27, 2002, 3:29:27 PM5/27/02
to

I am a restaurateur in San Antonio. At one of my restaurants, we offer
chili (in addition to 86 other menu items). Chili is not, by far, our most
popular menu item, but it is nonetheless very popular.

I lived in Dallas when the first Chili's opened on Greenville. Some of you
may recall that, at the time, Chili's was basically burgers and chili.
And, their initial expansion was based on that limited menu.

I certainly agree that BBQ is more popular than chili, and if the gentleman
from Canada wishes to experience what the locals eat, the Chicken Fried
Steak should not be overlooked.

Jerry


Michael Bolner

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May 27, 2002, 5:24:01 PM5/27/02
to
Kreuz Market is in Lockhart, TX and the Salt Lick is in Driftwood, TX.

Robert Myers

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May 27, 2002, 8:01:05 PM5/27/02
to
In article <Xns921BBD9D984F2...@24.28.95.158>, Karen Kay wrote:
> Bill <bgross...@airmail.net> wrote in
> news:4B342BDEED0E98E8.71938F89...@lp.airnews.
> net:
>> And certainly not with spaghetti or macaroni as the blasphemers
>> in Cincinnati do.
>
> They use chocolate, too...
What's wrong with chocolate in chili? It simply moves the heat up.

Frank Mancuso

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May 27, 2002, 9:30:19 PM5/27/02
to
And cinnamon!!

Terry Horton

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May 27, 2002, 10:21:37 PM5/27/02
to
On Tue, 28 May 2002 01:30:19 GMT, Frank Mancuso
<fr...@saintarnold.com> wrote:

>And cinnamon!!

I wonder would these recipes taste better if they didn't call them
'chili'?

s...@merritt.houston.tx.us

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May 27, 2002, 10:53:19 PM5/27/02
to
In houston.eats Richard Lee <REMOVE_...@ibc.ca> wrote:

ack, religion. nothing to see here, keep moving.


sam

s...@merritt.houston.tx.us

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May 27, 2002, 10:53:58 PM5/27/02
to
In houston.eats Jerry Davis <jjda...@flash.net> wrote:
> Don't restrict yourself to just hunting down chili. The real fightin'
> words are over the best barbecue beef brisket ...........

or chicken fried steak


sam

Richard Lee

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May 27, 2002, 11:27:58 PM5/27/02
to
On Tue, 28 May 2002 00:01:05 GMT, Robert Myers
<rpmy...@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote:

>What's wrong with chocolate in chili? It simply moves the heat up.

Even the gringos would think that's disgusting.

- Richard Lee


Nate

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May 28, 2002, 12:29:42 AM5/28/02
to

Worth the ride too--Good Lord, this place is good. Save room for some
dewberry cobbler.

Nate.

Bernie

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May 28, 2002, 2:29:31 AM5/28/02
to
Richard Lee wrote:

When you go for BBQ, don't restrict yourself to brisket. Try the sausage
and ribs too. (There is the danger that that will restart a discussion of
what types of meat you should smoke/bbq and what types of ribs are best.
My opinion, the ones that you like best are the best. For me that is a
sliced brisket sandwich, brisket and sausage, and pork ribs.) We haven't
even heard about the best sauces yet.

For green chili you might want to wait until you visit New Mexico. I've
found it a lot more common there. Sopapillas are also different in New
Mexico. In Tex Mex places sopapillas are a dessert. In New Mexico
they're served like dinner rolls. But I digress.

While in San Antonio, try the tortilla soup at the Alamo Cafe (which isn't
near the Alamo).

Bernie

Doc

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May 28, 2002, 3:17:29 AM5/28/02
to
On Sun, 26 May 2002 18:35:04 GMT, Steve Wertz <swe...@texas.net> wrote:
> Richard Lee wrote:
>>
>> On Sun, 26 May 2002 02:15:53 GMT, Steve Wertz <swe...@texas.net>
>> wrote:
>>
>> >Uh-oh. Another crossposted Chili thread...
>
>> So is there an FAQ on this matter?
>
> It states that Chili must be made with corn flour and eaten with Saltines.

You forgot the egg[s] over-easy and hard cheese on top....

Doc

Doc

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May 28, 2002, 3:51:11 AM5/28/02
to
On Mon, 27 May 2002 13:26:54 GMT, Richard Lee <REMOVE_...@ibc.ca> wrote:
>
> The concensus here seems to be that these amazing Texas barbeque beef
> briskets are not to be missed. That's in addition to the 'red' and
> 'green' chili (the latter of which I never heard of before, thanks all
> for enlightening me).

Be aware that "green chili" or especially "salsa verde" - green chili
sauce - is a LOT different in Central Texas than what you'll find in,
say, Lubbock. The salsa verde in Austin generally isn't really, but is
a tomatillo sauce with lotsa lime. Tomatillos are tasty little things,
but are not really even chilis. West Texas and Eastern New Mexico salsa
verde can make you cry. Literally. If your salsa is an olive-green
with a sort of orange-yellow tint, be _very_ careful. Very, very tasty,
but deadly.
You have to keep in mind that Texas is very big, and very spread-out.
The food styles vary a lot by region.
I seriously doubt that you'll get to Ft. Stockton, but there's a
little Mexican joint there that serves a Chili Verde con Carne that is
incredible. Every time I'm there, the name is different, but it's the
same menu and the same cook. Yum.


> So are you going to reveal the locations of these barbeque beef
> brisket places or am I just going to have to repost statewide under a
> different subject? My travel route in Texas may even be swayed by
> recommendations.

In Austin, if you want the ultimate fast food, there's a little BBQ
cart on Manchaca Rd. a block south of Ben White Blvd called DJ's. My
favorite is his chopped beef sandwich with a side of homemade soup, but
his brisket is great too.
Haven't really found a chili con carne here that I like. Make 'em put
a fried egg & grated cheese on top.

Doc

Scott Kurland

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May 28, 2002, 8:32:25 AM5/28/02
to
> >What's wrong with chocolate in chili? It simply moves the heat up.
>
> Even the gringos would think that's disgusting.
>
> - Richard Lee

HEY! Chocolate is the embodiment of every good thing, a foretaste of heaven.


vonroach

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May 28, 2002, 8:38:52 AM5/28/02
to
On Mon, 27 May 2002 13:26:54 GMT, REMOVE_...@ibc.ca (Richard Lee)
wrote:

>On Sun, 26 May 2002 22:36:22 GMT, vonr...@ix.netcom.com (vonroach)
>wrote:
>
>>Dicky, you ask a tenderfoot question. There is not even any fairly
>
>LOL. I did mention "best" is subject thus asking for personal
>opinions.

Another tenderfoot question.

>>Texas cuisine - barbecue (BarBQ, Baebeque,...)
>
>The concensus here seems to be that these amazing Texas barbeque beef
>briskets are not to be missed.

Wrong again, it is possible to dine very well in Texas on cuisine from
all over the world and not go near chili or barbecue. Your `consensus'
is provincial.
>
>- Richard Lee
>

vonroach

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May 28, 2002, 8:40:17 AM5/28/02
to

Well for openers they are usually called `greasy spoons', locally.

J DeBerry

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May 28, 2002, 10:50:48 AM5/28/02
to

grubber wrote:

> "Richard Lee" <REMOVE_...@ibc.ca> wrote in message

> news:3cf019b3.68758133@nntp...
> | Hello. I'll be a first-time visitor to your state while attending the
> | Siggraph conference in San Antonio in July. I will be travelling
> | around the state outside of the conference dates. While I am currently
> | doing research on Texas, there is one foremost question on my mind.
> | As only the locals know best, I'd like to hear from you Texans where
> | you think the best chili is to be found in your state. Isn't it the de
> | facto official dish of Texas aside from a 4 pound longhorn steak (or
> | is that 6, hehehe)?
> |
> | Now I realize "best" is a rather subject term, taste is personal and
> | even chili can have quite a variation. So maybe the question ought to
> | be who's serving an "interesting variation" of an old theme.
> |
> | No your mom doesn't qualify unless she'll invite me. So name the
> | restaurants and I will thank you from the bottom of my fire-retardent
> | heart.


> |
> | - Richard Lee (Toronto, Canada)
> |
>

> I haven't been there in a while, but the Texas Chili Parlor on Lavaca in
> Austin used to define 'chili' for me (back in the early 80's). After many
> attempts, I figured out how to make a chili in their style, and then
> improved it enough that I haven't needed to go back. I did go back a few
> years ago and was disappointed at how greasy their chili was at that time.
> It was still extremely good, but greasier than I remembered. Put it on your
> short list.
>
> But I agree with the other poster that forsaking bbq from Kreuz' or the Salt
> Lick etc etc in your quest for the ultimate bowl of red will leave your life
> unfulfilled.

A couple of years ago the Dallas Mourning Star sent out some of its
tasters to check out the best Chili in Dallas. Surprisingly one of the
top ones was none other than Chili's.

JGD

J DeBerry

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May 28, 2002, 10:53:08 AM5/28/02
to

Karen Kay wrote:

> Bill <bgross...@airmail.net> wrote in
> news:4B342BDEED0E98E8.71938F89...@lp.airnews.
> net:

> > And certainly not with spaghetti or macaroni as the blasphemers
> > in Cincinnati do.
>

> They use chocolate, too...
>

No carrots and peas???

JGD

JLH

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May 28, 2002, 11:08:11 AM5/28/02