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Keithr0

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Feb 8, 2024, 7:03:48 AMFeb 8
to

Xeno

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Feb 8, 2024, 6:18:51 PMFeb 8
to
On 8/2/2024 11:03 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
> https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/other-industries/700-jobs-100-stores-to-go-as-tyre-retailer-folds/news-story/f154c0e31e44b4df0e99e0549690e940

That's been in the wind for quite some time. The local Beaurepaire tyre
centre was *rebranded* to *Stormy's Tyre and Auto* some time back, a
year or two at the very least.

--
Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
(with apologies to Ralph Waldo Emerson)

Noddy

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Feb 8, 2024, 8:02:40 PMFeb 8
to
It's a worrying time.

The list of long established businesses that have folded in the last 18
months is staggering, With the building trade seemingly being the most
adversely affected with some 1700+ building companies, large and small,
going into recievership over that time. The flow on effects of these
failures are enormous, and combined with the Government's (both state
and federal) continual tax hikes to cover their own ineptitude it looks
very much like we're headed for a world of pain.

Hope people have got some cash squirrelled away....



--
--
--
Regards,
Noddy.

Daryl

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Feb 8, 2024, 8:21:36 PMFeb 8
to
On 9/2/2024 12:02 pm, Noddy wrote:
> On 8/02/2024 11:03 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
>
>> https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/other-industries/700-jobs-100-stores-to-go-as-tyre-retailer-folds/news-story/f154c0e31e44b4df0e99e0549690e940
>
>
> It's a worrying time.
>
> The list of long established businesses that have folded in the last 18
> months is staggering, With the building trade seemingly being the most
> adversely affected with some 1700+ building companies, large and small,
> going into recievership over that time. The flow on effects of these
> failures are enormous, and combined with the Government's (both state
> and federal) continual tax hikes to cover their own ineptitude it looks
> very much like we're headed for a world of pain.

Agree, glad I'm retired and not in business anymore.
Even businesses such as solar installers are finding it difficult,
Govt's are supposedly encouraging the use of renewable energy whilst at
the same time making life very difficult for people who sell and install
solar, new rules and regulations appear almost on a monthly basis, the
red tape and paperwork involved is extreme.



--
Daryl

Xeno

unread,
Feb 8, 2024, 9:04:57 PMFeb 8
to
On 9/2/2024 12:21 pm, Daryl wrote:
> On 9/2/2024 12:02 pm, Noddy wrote:
>> On 8/02/2024 11:03 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
>>
>>> https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/other-industries/700-jobs-100-stores-to-go-as-tyre-retailer-folds/news-story/f154c0e31e44b4df0e99e0549690e940
>>
>>
>> It's a worrying time.
>>
>> The list of long established businesses that have folded in the last
>> 18 months is staggering, With the building trade seemingly being the
>> most adversely affected with some 1700+ building companies, large and
>> small, going into recievership over that time. The flow on effects of
>> these failures are enormous, and combined with the Government's (both
>> state and federal) continual tax hikes to cover their own ineptitude
>> it looks very much like we're headed for a world of pain.
>
> Agree, glad I'm retired and not in business anymore.

Not like you had a choice, eh? You *preceded* Beaurepaires into failure!

> Even businesses such as solar installers are finding it difficult,
> Govt's are supposedly encouraging the use of renewable energy whilst at
> the same time making life very difficult for people who sell and install
> solar, new rules and regulations appear almost on a monthly basis, the
> red tape and paperwork involved is extreme.
>

Yet you will be the first to complain when installers break the rules
and kill people.

Xeno

unread,
Feb 8, 2024, 9:16:08 PMFeb 8
to
On 9/2/2024 12:02 pm, Noddy wrote:
> On 8/02/2024 11:03 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
>
>> https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/other-industries/700-jobs-100-stores-to-go-as-tyre-retailer-folds/news-story/f154c0e31e44b4df0e99e0549690e940
>
>
> It's a worrying time.
>
> The list of long established businesses that have folded in the last 18
> months is staggering, With the building trade seemingly being the most
> adversely affected with some 1700+ building companies, large and small,

The causes are well known and easily explainable. Fixed price contracts
and rising material costs covers it pretty well in the building industry.

> going into recievership over that time. The flow on effects of these
> failures are enormous, and combined with the Government's (both state
> and federal) continual tax hikes to cover their own ineptitude it looks

Tax hikes Darren? Do you have a clue what you write about?

https://www.etax.com.au/stage-3-tax-cuts-explained/

I'd say an emphatic *no*.

> very much like we're headed for a world of pain.

With all the bullshit you spin, you might well be! The rest of us, no.
>
> Hope people have got some cash squirrelled away....



--

Keithr0

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Feb 9, 2024, 12:10:52 AMFeb 9
to
Building companies have been hit largely because most of their contracts
are fixed price and there has been a major escalation in the cost of
materials.

Daryl

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Feb 9, 2024, 1:21:38 AMFeb 9
to
True that's mostly the problem but the way many of them do business
doesn't help, a well organised builder can complete a normal size house
in 3-4mths but most take at least double that so it takes them a lot
longer to get paid.
If they started soon after signing a contract and completed the build in
a timely manner they would only have to deal with price increases over a
smaller time period so its less likely to be a problem.


--
Daryl

Xeno

unread,
Feb 9, 2024, 2:50:23 AMFeb 9
to
On 9/2/2024 5:21 pm, Daryl wrote:
> On 9/2/2024 4:10 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
>> On 9/02/2024 11:02 am, Noddy wrote:
>>> On 8/02/2024 11:03 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
>>>
>>>> https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/other-industries/700-jobs-100-stores-to-go-as-tyre-retailer-folds/news-story/f154c0e31e44b4df0e99e0549690e940
>>>
>>>
>>> It's a worrying time.
>>>
>>> The list of long established businesses that have folded in the last
>>> 18 months is staggering, With the building trade seemingly being the
>>> most adversely affected with some 1700+ building companies, large and
>>> small, going into recievership over that time. The flow on effects of
>>> these failures are enormous, and combined with the Government's (both
>>> state and federal) continual tax hikes to cover their own ineptitude
>>> it looks very much like we're headed for a world of pain.
>>>
>>> Hope people have got some cash squirrelled away....
>>
>> Building companies have been hit largely because most of their
>> contracts are fixed price and there has been a major escalation in the
>> cost of materials.
>>
>
>
> True that's mostly the problem but the way many of them do business
> doesn't help, a well organised builder can complete a normal size house
> in 3-4mths but most take at least double that so it takes them a lot
> longer to get paid.

And ask yourself why builders don't get started straight away! A
*shortage* of materials is one such reason. Then there are delays
getting necessary approvals. I think you need to get to know a few
builders. It's complicated and, given your business acumen, or lack
thereof, best you keep your thoughts to yourself.

> If they started soon after signing a contract and completed the build in
> a timely manner they would only have to deal with price increases over a
> smaller time period so its less likely to be a problem.
>
If only it were that simple!

Xeno

unread,
Feb 9, 2024, 2:52:39 AMFeb 9
to
On 9/2/2024 4:10 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
You're wasting your effort, Darren's only experience is with a *fake*
business so any input from him is, well, bullshit!

Mighty Mouse

unread,
Feb 9, 2024, 3:55:14 AMFeb 9
to
Xeno wrote:
> On 9/2/2024 5:21 pm, Daryl wrote:
>> On 9/2/2024 4:10 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
>>> On 9/02/2024 11:02 am, Noddy wrote:
>>>> On 8/02/2024 11:03 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/other-industries/700-jobs-100-stores-to-go-as-tyre-retailer-folds/news-story/f154c0e31e44b4df0e99e0549690e940
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> It's a worrying time.
>>>>
>>>> The list of long established businesses that have folded in the
>>>> last 18 months is staggering, With the building trade seemingly
>>>> being the most adversely affected with some 1700+ building
>>>> companies, large and small, going into recievership over that time.
>>>> The flow on effects of these failures are enormous, and combined
>>>> with the Government's (both state and federal) continual tax hikes
>>>> to cover their own ineptitude it looks very much like we're headed
>>>> for a world of pain.
>>>>
>>>> Hope people have got some cash squirrelled away....
>>>
>>> Building companies have been hit largely because most of their
>>> contracts are fixed price and there has been a major escalation in
>>> the cost of materials.
>>>
>>
>>
>> True that's mostly the problem but the way many of them do business
>> doesn't help, a well organised builder can complete a normal size
>> house in 3-4mths but most take at least double that so it takes them
>> a lot longer to get paid.
>

because builders are not building just one house at a time, but many
homes simultaneously. anyone who has a built a home has experienced the
stoppages that occur for up to weeks at a time while the needed
tradespersons for the next stage of the build are busy on another home,
and you're sitting around wondering when they are going to start on
yours again.

> And ask yourself why builders don't get started straight away! A
> *shortage* of materials is one such reason. Then there are delays
> getting necessary approvals. I think you need to get to know a few
> builders. It's complicated and, given your business acumen, or lack
> thereof, best you keep your thoughts to yourself.
>
>> If they started soon after signing a contract and completed the build
>> in a timely manner they would only have to deal with price increases
>> over a smaller time period so its less likely to be a problem.
>>
> If only it were that simple!
>

and it's not

--
Have a nice day!..


Noddy

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Feb 9, 2024, 5:28:09 AMFeb 9
to
That's one of the problems but it's far from the only one.

Major issues in the building industry at the moment are not only
material costs but also material shortages. Particularly of things like
Timber in Victoria where a state government moratorium on logging has
virtually brought an end to local timber production which has seen
widespread shortages. There have also been wide reaching changes to
Cultural Heritage regulations where now it is virtually impossible to
carry out any building project without first having obtained a "Cultural
Heritage Permit" which can take up to 12 months to be granted and cost
many thousands of dollars.

Some people have been critical of builders for having "fixed price
contracts" in environments like we see today, but they don't really have
any choice. Unlike your average new car buyer who can sign a "fixed
price" contract which will be full of clauses stating that the dealer is
entitled to change the contract price if the price of the car changes
between the time the contract is signed and the day of delivery,
builders do not have that luxury available to them as the building
contract has to be put before the bank for a mortgage to be taken
against it in the majority of cases, and there isn't a lender in the
country who will approve a mortgage where the contract price could be
out by thousands of dollars by the time the build is complete.

So the best most builders can do is lock the customer in at a fixed
price and hope like hell that the build goes to plan and they don't do
their balls in the mean time.

Sadly though, that plan isn't working out for a great many of them.

Noddy

unread,
Feb 9, 2024, 5:29:02 AMFeb 9
to
Unfortunately it's getting way more complicated than that.

Daryl

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Feb 9, 2024, 5:46:29 AMFeb 9
to
True its more complicated but slowly building a house doesn't help the
builders bottom line.
The block next door to me has been vacant for the 4yrs I've been here
until a about a month ago when they started construction, so far they
have poured the slab and its now ready for the frame but its been nearly
2 weeks and so far no sign of any timber on site which is slow compared
to many of the other houses I've seen being built around here.
The quickest had carpenters putting up the frame 24hrs after the slab
was poured which was crazy.
Possibly a shortage of timber and or the tradies needed to erect it.


--
Daryl

Xeno

unread,
Feb 9, 2024, 7:01:28 AMFeb 9
to
On 9/2/2024 9:28 pm, Noddy wrote:
Yeah, there's a shortage of tradies in the construction industry too. No
doubt, in Victoria, there'll be plenty of fake tradies - you know, fakes
like you!

Noddy

unread,
Feb 9, 2024, 7:15:52 AMFeb 9
to
On 9/02/2024 9:46 pm, Daryl wrote:
> On 9/2/2024 9:28 pm, Noddy wrote:

>>>
>>> True that's mostly the problem but the way many of them do business
>>> doesn't help, a well organised builder can complete a normal size
>>> house in 3-4mths but most take at least double that so it takes them
>>> a lot longer to get paid.
>>> If they started soon after signing a contract and completed the build
>>> in a timely manner they would only have to deal with price increases
>>> over a smaller time period so its less likely to be a problem.
>>
>> Unfortunately it's getting way more complicated than that.
>>
>
> True its more complicated but slowly building a house doesn't help the
> builders bottom line.

No, but in a lot of cases there's not a hell of a lot they can do about it.

> The block next door to me has been vacant for the 4yrs I've been here
> until a about a month ago when they started construction, so far they
> have poured the slab and its now ready for the frame but its been nearly
> 2 weeks and so far no sign of any timber on site which is slow compared
> to many of the other houses I've seen being built around here.

They might have a decent builder. You're supposed to let a slab cure for
28 days or more before building on it :)

> The quickest had carpenters putting up the frame 24hrs after the slab
> was poured which was crazy.

Yep. The contrete would still be soft enough to poke a hole in it with a
screwdriver.

> Possibly a shortage of timber and or the tradies needed to erect it.

And everything else.

alvey

unread,
Feb 9, 2024, 4:13:03 PMFeb 9
to
Noddy wrote:
> On 8/02/2024 11:03 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
>
>> https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/other-industries/700-jobs-100-stores-to-go-as-tyre-retailer-folds/news-story/f154c0e31e44b4df0e99e0549690e940
>>
>
>
> It's a worrying time.
>
> The list of long established businesses that have folded in the last 18
> months is staggering, With the building trade seemingly being the most
> adversely affected with some 1700+ building companies, large and small,
> going into recievership over that time. The flow on effects of these
> failures are enormous, and combined with the Government's (both state
> and federal) continual tax hikes to cover their own ineptitude it looks
> very much like we're headed for a world of pain.

lol!
What happened to your Trumpeted wealth and investment properties Fraudster?


alvey

Daryl

unread,
Feb 9, 2024, 5:42:15 PMFeb 9
to
On 9/2/2024 11:15 pm, Noddy wrote:
> On 9/02/2024 9:46 pm, Daryl wrote:
>> On 9/2/2024 9:28 pm, Noddy wrote:
>
>>>>
>>>> True that's mostly the problem but the way many of them do business
>>>> doesn't help, a well organised builder can complete a normal size
>>>> house in 3-4mths but most take at least double that so it takes them
>>>> a lot longer to get paid.
>>>> If they started soon after signing a contract and completed the
>>>> build in a timely manner they would only have to deal with price
>>>> increases over a smaller time period so its less likely to be a
>>>> problem.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately it's getting way more complicated than that.
>>>
>>
>> True its more complicated but slowly building a house doesn't help the
>> builders bottom line.
>
> No, but in a lot of cases there's not a hell of a lot they can do about it.
>
>> The block next door to me has been vacant for the 4yrs I've been here
>> until a about a month ago when they started construction, so far they
>> have poured the slab and its now ready for the frame but its been
>> nearly 2 weeks and so far no sign of any timber on site which is slow
>> compared to many of the other houses I've seen being built around here.
>
> They might have a decent builder. You're supposed to let a slab cure for
> 28 days or more before building on it :)

Les tells me that 4 days is minimum, after 4 days its at 70% of its
strength so OK to start putting up a frame.
Mine was left for 7 days before the carpenters arrived.

>
>> The quickest had carpenters putting up the frame 24hrs after the slab
>> was poured which was crazy.
>
> Yep. The contrete would still be soft enough to poke a hole in it with a
> screwdriver.

It was a appalling, the house has been rented out since day one so maybe
the landlord/builder didn't give a stuff about building it properly.
I speak to the tenant occasionally and she has never mentioned there
being anything wrong with the house.

--
Daryl

Keithr0

unread,
Feb 9, 2024, 5:46:48 PMFeb 9
to
On 10/02/2024 8:42 am, Daryl wrote:

> I speak to the tenant occasionally and she has never mentioned there
> being anything wrong with the house.
>
Yet.

Mighty Mouse

unread,
Feb 10, 2024, 12:12:36 AMFeb 10
to
noddy is sounding like a normal person lately. it's very strange..

> alvey

Noddy

unread,
Feb 10, 2024, 12:29:59 AMFeb 10
to
They probably just wanted it up as quickly as possible to start getting
a return on their money.

> I speak to the tenant occasionally and she has never mentioned there
> being anything wrong with the house.

There might not be. Then again, there might be in a few years.

Daryl

unread,
Feb 10, 2024, 7:44:37 AMFeb 10
to
Its about 3.5yrs old so it may take a while for problems to appear.


--
Daryl

Daryl

unread,
Feb 10, 2024, 7:53:00 AMFeb 10
to
On 10/2/2024 4:29 pm, Noddy wrote:
> On 10/02/2024 9:42 am, Daryl wrote:
>> On 9/2/2024 11:15 pm, Noddy wrote:
>
>>>
>>> They might have a decent builder. You're supposed to let a slab cure
>>> for 28 days or more before building on it :)
>>
>> Les tells me that 4 days is minimum, after 4 days its at 70% of its
>> strength so OK to start putting up a frame.
>> Mine was left for 7 days before the carpenters arrived.
>>
>>>
>>>> The quickest had carpenters putting up the frame 24hrs after the
>>>> slab was poured which was crazy.
>>>
>>> Yep. The contrete would still be soft enough to poke a hole in it
>>> with a screwdriver.
>>
>> It was a appalling, the house has been rented out since day one so
>> maybe the landlord/builder didn't give a stuff about building it
>> properly.
>
> They probably just wanted it up as quickly as possible to start getting
> a return on their money.

Could be, building standards around here seen to vary a lot, a lot of my
area is land that has a lot of fill on it including my house, my house
is built on 59 piers, the deepest at the back of the house is almost
7mtrs deep, 2 houses away they used screw piles but the house on the
other side of them has no extra foundations, just a normal slab.
The developer claimed that the land has been compacted and doesn't need
extra foundations yet most of the builders disagree, our builder
wouldn't build the house without piers.
Time will tell if the few that were built without extra foundations
survive the test of time.
>
>> I speak to the tenant occasionally and she has never mentioned there
>> being anything wrong with the house.
>
> There might not be. Then again, there might be in a few years.
>

Its anyone guess.


--
Daryl

Noddy

unread,
Feb 10, 2024, 5:40:25 PMFeb 10
to
On 10/02/2024 11:52 pm, Daryl wrote:
> On 10/2/2024 4:29 pm, Noddy wrote:

>>
>> They probably just wanted it up as quickly as possible to start
>> getting a return on their money.
>
> Could be, building standards around here seen to vary a lot, a lot of my
> area is land that has a lot of fill on it including my house, my house
> is built on 59 piers, the deepest at the back of the house is almost
> 7mtrs deep, 2 houses away they used screw piles but the house on the
> other side of them has no extra foundations, just a normal slab.
> The developer claimed that the land has been compacted and doesn't need
> extra foundations yet most of the builders disagree, our builder
> wouldn't build the house without piers.
> Time will tell if the few that were built without extra foundations
> survive the test of time.

They sure will.

I went past your area yesterday on my way home from a swap meet in
Glenlyon. They're certainly clearing a lot of land for development.

Daryl

unread,
Feb 10, 2024, 6:22:57 PMFeb 10
to
On the left as you head west towards Ballarat?
If so that's the new part of the Underbank estate, on the other side of
the valley to me about 3km away.

--
Daryl

Xeno

unread,
Feb 10, 2024, 8:35:55 PMFeb 10
to
Well, he's not bullshitting as much, that is certain. But then, he's
been outed as the greatest bullshit artist usenet has ever seen so no
small wonder he's relatively subdued of late. *Anything* and
*everything* he posts comes under intense scrutiny (as it should)!
>
>> alvey

Noddy

unread,
Feb 10, 2024, 11:11:08 PMFeb 10
to
Yeah.

> If so that's the new part of the Underbank estate, on the other side of
> the valley to me about 3km away.

Right. Lots of houses going in there by the looks. If they can find a
builder who doesn't go broke that is.

Daryl

unread,
Feb 11, 2024, 1:10:43 AMFeb 11
to
On 11/2/2024 3:11 pm, Noddy wrote:
> On 11/02/2024 10:22 am, Daryl wrote:
>> On 11/2/2024 9:40 am, Noddy wrote:
>
>>> I went past your area yesterday on my way home from a swap meet in
>>> Glenlyon. They're certainly clearing a lot of land for development.
>>>
>>>
>> On the left as you head west towards Ballarat?
>
> Yeah.
>
>> If so that's the new part of the Underbank estate, on the other side
>> of the valley to me about 3km away.
>
> Right. Lots of houses going in there by the looks.

The estate is supposedly getting a shopping centre plus a community
centre with gym and swimming pool, the old Underbank stables are still
there and its being turned into a community space for things like markets.
The new section you saw will eventually join up the established section.
Problem with all that is that there is compulsory fee that everyone
agrees to pay when they sign the contract to buy the land, last time I
heard it was like a body corporate fee and was about $1200PA to use the
facilities and you pay if you use them or not.
It was one of the reasons we bought in the Stonehill estate and not
Underbank.

If they can find a
> builder who doesn't go broke that is.
>
That's becoming increasingly difficult.


--
Daryl

Mighty Mouse

unread,
Feb 11, 2024, 11:04:39 PMFeb 11
to
he's not abusing, insulting, or criticizing anyone at present, just
commenting and posting rationally, as everyone should be

alvey

unread,
Feb 12, 2024, 12:51:54 AMFeb 12
to
It doesn't matter felix. Until he admits that all his busted claims were
lies he'll still be a pariah and an object of ridicule to me.


alvey

Xeno

unread,
Feb 12, 2024, 3:12:57 AMFeb 12
to
Ditto!

____
Xeno


Keithr0

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Feb 12, 2024, 3:14:55 AMFeb 12
to
On 12/02/2024 2:04 pm, Mighty Mouse wrote:
> Xeno wrote:
>> On 10/2/2024 4:12 pm, Mighty Mouse wrote:
>>> alvey wrote:
>>>> Noddy wrote:
>>>>> On 8/02/2024 11:03 pm, Keithr0 wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/other-industries/700-jobs-100-stores-to-go-as-tyre-retailer-folds/news-story/f154c0e31e44b4df0e99e0549690e940
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> It's a worrying time.
>>>>>
>>>>> The list of long established businesses that have folded in the
>>>>> last 18 months is staggering, With the building trade seemingly
>>>>> being the most adversely affected with some 1700+ building
>>>>> companies, large and small, going into recievership over that time.
>>>>> The flow on effects of these failures are enormous, and combined
>>>>> with the Government's (both state and federal) continual tax hikes
>>>>> to cover their own ineptitude it looks very much like we're headed
>>>>> for a world of pain.
>>>>
>>>> lol!
>>>> What happened to your Trumpeted wealth and investment properties
>>>> Fraudster?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> noddy is sounding like a normal person lately. it's very strange..
>>
>> Well, he's not bullshitting as much, that is certain. But then, he's
>> been outed as the greatest bullshit artist usenet has ever seen so no
>> small wonder he's relatively subdued of late. *Anything* and
>> *everything* he posts comes under intense scrutiny (as it should)!

ROTFL, you don't get out much do you? He isn't even in the second league
let alone one of the greats

Clocky

unread,
Feb 12, 2024, 11:40:38 PMFeb 12
to
He goes through these periods sometimes but don't worry, it won't last.
This ChatGPT version of the fraud will be gone soon enough and the real
one will resurface.

--
In thread "May need to buy petrol soon" Sept 23 2021 11:15:59am
Keithr0 wrote: "He made the assertion either he proves it or he is a
proven liar."

On Sept 23 2021 3:16:29pm Keithr0 wrote:
"He asserts that the claim is true, so, if it is unproven, he is lying."
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