Testing android code on devices

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Anders Nilsson Plymoth

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Nov 12, 2008, 5:06:51 PM11/12/08
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Hi,

It appears that T-Mobile is closing down root access to the G1, effectively disabling all their customers from using their devices as they want.

Does this mean that the ONLY way that you can currently test code you develop for android is on the EMULATOR?

Thanks,
Anders

Keith

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Nov 12, 2008, 7:57:36 PM11/12/08
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No, you can run it on the device that you are developing or porting to.

If you want to test code for an application (Java API), you don't need root.
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Keith Dart
keith...@gmail.com
==============================

Anders Nilsson Plymoth

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Nov 12, 2008, 8:21:43 PM11/12/08
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I wasn't referring to java applications. I know you that works fine.

I was referring to modifying the android source code itself, modifying drivers, the kernel, the jvm etc. Loading and unloading kernel modules.

So, my question is:
Does this mean that the ONLY way that you can currently test code you develop for the android platform, using the android source tree, is on the EMULATOR?

Thanks,
Anders

Keith

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Nov 12, 2008, 8:26:07 PM11/12/08
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Android is different from G1. The G1 retail device is not really a development platform.

But the answer to your question is: no.

Mark Murphy

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Nov 12, 2008, 8:27:00 PM11/12/08
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Anders Nilsson Plymoth wrote:
> So, my question is:
> Does this mean that the ONLY way that you can currently test code you
> develop for the android platform, using the android source tree, is on
> the EMULATOR?

I suspect the answer is "yes, the emulator is the only way", until such
time as a piece of Android-powered hardware becomes available that
supports flashing new firmware.

It is definitely disappointing that the G1 doesn't support replacing the
firmware. I expected better, given HTC's track record on that subject.
But, Android is Apache 2.0-licensed, so nobody has any means to force
them to behave differently.

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Mark Murphy (a Commons Guy)
http://commonsware.com

Android Training on the Ranch! -- Mar 16-20, 2009
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Anders Nilsson Plymoth

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Nov 12, 2008, 8:49:08 PM11/12/08
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It is definitely disappointing that the G1 doesn't support replacing the firmware. I expected better, given HTC's track record on that subject. But, Android is Apache 2.0-licensed, so nobody has any means to force them to behave differently.

I agree its very disappointing and that its not the license itself but very bad policy. Its very much like buying a laptop, say an HP with Windows Vista or XP as OS. After a few weeks, HP releases an update to their firmware that disables all your accounts to have administration rights.
Who would accept that? No one.

I can't really see why T-Mobile allows this. You can buy a pc-card and plug it in to your laptop and access the internet through their network. Whats the difference? The G1 is like a handhelp laptop.
With a fully open G1 you are still going to have to use their network, you have paid for a subscription, the SIM card controls your access to the T-mobile network, and they still make the same amount of money.
Really stupid T-mobile.

Anders

Keith

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Nov 13, 2008, 2:01:09 AM11/13/08
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Anders Nilsson Plymoth

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Nov 13, 2008, 2:09:24 AM11/13/08
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what?

Abraham Arce

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Nov 13, 2008, 2:35:03 AM11/13/08
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Anders,

There are several hardware platforms that allow you to contribute to
source code at a kernel level like omapzoom.org

Best Regards
Abraham Arce

Jon Bostrom

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Nov 13, 2008, 11:20:40 AM11/13/08
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For cellphone use I believe that Android opensource is
really only for manufacturers, I don't think carriers will
open their phones to loading firmware in order to protect
their networks. Mobile phones are not PC's they are an
integral extension of the operators network and have too
tight a technical and business connection to the network to
be opened up. Also I think there would be an issue with the
FCC as phones must pass FCC cert. Since the firmware has
the radio stack, I don't think it would be allowed to touch
that part of the system. So in many ways for the cellphone
industry the OPEN Platform hype of Android is really just
that...hype
jon

> keith...@gmail.com <mailto:keith...@gmail.com>
> ==============================
>
>

Jim Ancona

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Nov 13, 2008, 4:23:10 PM11/13/08
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On Nov 13, 11:20 am, Jon Bostrom <yon...@gmail.com> wrote:
> For cellphone use I believe that Android opensource is
> really only for manufacturers, I don't think carriers will
> open their phones to loading firmware in order to protect
> their networks.  Mobile phones are not PC's they are an
> integral extension of the operators network and have too
> tight a technical and business connection to the network to
> be opened up.  Also I think there would be an issue with the
> FCC as phones must pass FCC cert.  Since the firmware has
> the radio stack, I don't think it would be allowed to touch
> that part of the system.  So in many ways for the cellphone
> industry the OPEN Platform hype of Android is really just
> that...hype

This isn't true in general. It is possible to use open hardware
without violating legal or technical restrictions. As an existence
proof otherwise see http://openmoko.org/. The Freerunner is a phone
which is sold in multiple countries and works on networks all over the
world, yet runs multiple open source distributions (including
Android). So the network operator and regulatory constraints aren't
insurmountable. You're right that within the current business model of
locked and subsidized handsets, it unlikely that the network operators
will allow wide-open use of the hardware. But perhaps the hardware
vendors will have different incentives.

Jim
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