Google Android Challenge II bugix..!

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sommeralex

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Sep 1, 2009, 8:15:59 PM9/1/09
to Android Developers
Hello Google!

I cant find a proper email to contact you, therefore, i write you
here.. I have submitted an Application for the google android
challenge but did a big mistake when I was re-send the application. I
removed the Allow Android Mock Location Permission but forgot to
remove the testProvider in my Application. Now, i just wanted to start
my application again and was wondering why it didnt work.

Because of an Permission Exception..

I hope, that there is a way to still take part in this challenge.. I
know, that there are rules and that it would be un-managable if every
developer would come with bugs..

hm..

hope to hear from you soon,
alex

sommeralex

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Sep 2, 2009, 10:55:15 AM9/2/09
to Android Developers
google, please answer!!

Eric Wong (hdmp4.com)

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Sep 2, 2009, 10:39:12 PM9/2/09
to Android Developers
Good luck getting google to help you on this.
I don't think they would do anything to help you ;)

Remember the no revision rule after deadline for ADC2?

Eric

riz

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Sep 2, 2009, 10:55:13 PM9/2/09
to Android Developers
but there should be at least bug fixing or version upgrade option
available because we are not changing the ORIGINAL IDEA SUBMITTED .

On Sep 3, 7:39 am, "Eric Wong (hdmp4.com)" <ericwon...@gmail.com>
wrote:

Dan Sherman

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Sep 2, 2009, 11:05:12 PM9/2/09
to android-d...@googlegroups.com
Right, but that would be very difficult to enforce, as I'm sure a lot of other people would love to make "bug fixes" to their app over the next week :)

- Dan

sommeralex

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Sep 3, 2009, 5:51:02 AM9/3/09
to Android Developers
Yeah, it would be difficult to enforce, BUT


1.
If the lock provider has no permission, but the network and gps
provider has, the application should run and just dismiss any
addTestProvider INSTEAD of crashing the WHOLE application.

2.
As riz said, updates should be allowed!

3.
This "experience" has also a good point for me and my team: we wont
invest our whole energy in google anymore. I will definitely now
target iPhone and NOKIA with more "expectations" as I had before.
Nothing is more frustrating as taking part in a challenge and being
"ignored" due to a dubious error, therefore an error which is in my
opinion disputatious.

4.
If the story of google is true, and they first went to YAHOO with
their idea, they should have learned also from this experience. YAHOO
didnt give GOOGLE a chance, so they had to stand on their own legs.
Which was good for them. And now, they do same with others: noone gets
a second chance. And I think this will be also good for our project
airwriting. Maybe, its destiny.

Eric Wong (hdmp4.com)

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Sep 3, 2009, 8:01:17 PM9/3/09
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Try physically grabbing a google employee and tell them those ;)
(and then tell us the results)

No point complaining here, everyone here knows Google does not listen.

Cheers
Eric

Dan Sherman

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Sep 3, 2009, 8:10:38 PM9/3/09
to android-d...@googlegroups.com
Google definitely listens.  They've been more than helpful on many occasions (especially Dianne and Romain), however, if they had to field every special request I'd imagine they'd be pretty swamped...

- Dan

CraigsRace

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Sep 3, 2009, 8:40:01 PM9/3/09
to Android Developers
Google have been brilliant IMO. They have helped me out a lot on
these forums! Big thanks to them, and to the rest of the
community! :)

My 2 cents: Personally, I'm glad they don't allow bug fixes. Devs
would just submit new features (maybe copied from other apps ideas)
saying they were "bug fixes".


On Sep 4, 10:10 am, Dan Sherman <impact...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Google definitely listens.  They've been more than helpful on many occasions
> (especially Dianne and Romain), however, if they had to field every special
> request I'd imagine they'd be pretty swamped...
>
> - Dan
>
> On Thu, Sep 3, 2009 at 8:01 PM, Eric Wong (hdmp4.com)
> <ericwon...@gmail.com>wrote:

Maps.Huge.Info (Maps API Guru)

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Sep 4, 2009, 12:32:02 AM9/4/09
to Android Developers
You knew the rules for months in advance, so who can you blame for not
properly testing your app?

In a way, the rules of this challenge are a lot like the real world of
projects, deadlines and customer expectations. You have a deadline and
the customer (Google in this case) expects to have a reasonably well
running app when they pay the bill. Deadlines in the real world are
serious and meaningful.

Personally, I applaud the way Google has worked this out.

-John Coryat

CaseyB

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Sep 4, 2009, 11:04:24 AM9/4/09
to Android Developers
You can complain about Google all you want but the fact is that it's
your mistake and what your team should have actually learned was to
implement better testung and QA processes.

sommeralex

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Sep 4, 2009, 4:37:35 PM9/4/09
to Android Developers
1.
i dont complain. as I said: maybe its destiny. if a MOCK LOCATION
PERMISSION ERROR is the reason for not taking part in this challenge,
it shall be.

2.
maybe there are people who will copy ideas from others. but this does
not mean that me or my team would copy ideas! it would be very helpful
if people could bugfix their application for lets say, somedays after
their submission. They also could write a feature list and send it
with their first submission. this would prevent "copying and stealing
foreign ideas" if they bugfix some LITTLE faults.

3.
I dont blame google. It was a request.

4.
We did test our application. Finally, we had one hour more to test the
client before the deadline. But noone would have expected that the
mock-permission would cause an error.

so..
i think we can close this chapter.

@: All participiants who could submit and had no errors, .. i wish you
all the best!

alex
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