Android as a virtual PBX

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Masoom Alam

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Sep 23, 2009, 6:18:42 AM9/23/09
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Can Android be used as Virtual PBX. This means that, it can work as a virtual attendant for playing specific music files, call fowarding, recording messages. 
SipDroid is already available but it is just a client soft phone. 



Regards,
M Alam

Roman ( T-Mobile USA)

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Sep 23, 2009, 5:17:45 PM9/23/09
to Android Developers
Of course you could think of to run your Android device as a server
like system, but be aware that in case of cellular you have to deal
with NAT. This means all your clients have to know how to reach you.
One possibility to deal with this problem would be to use a cloud
service and notify the cloud about your new IP address.

In general you can easily support data traffic which does not need to
be in a session context (no streaming) like browsing. In this cases
you always can re-establish a connection.

To run your mobile Android server in a Wifi environment might be
easier to handle than cellular but this depends again how your Wifi
LAN is setup.

--
Roman Baumgaertner
Sr. SW Engineer-OSDC
·T· · ·Mobile· stick together
The views, opinions and statements in this email are those of the
author solely in their individual capacity, and do not necessarily
represent those of T-Mobile USA, Inc.

JoaJP

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Sep 23, 2009, 7:11:30 PM9/23/09
to Android Developers
NAT's a problem, so is getting across Hotspot portals and, worst of
all, hunting for WiFi. I've done that a few years ago for short while
(on a non-Android device, of course), and it gets old real fast.
This means one would expect to run SIP over the 3G data network. I
haven't had an opportunity to just go and try it out... my question
here is what T-Mobile USA's position is on allowing subscribers to run
SIP over the 3G network?


On Sep 23, 2:17 pm, "Roman ( T-Mobile USA)" <roman.baumgaert...@t-

Chris Stratton

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Sep 23, 2009, 10:17:11 PM9/23/09
to Android Developers
Not really clear if you mean "android" in the sense of currently
available "phone" hardware running it, or in the sense of the software
platform itself.

If the former, then provided that you mean wifi and not 3g then its
probably doable, though you might find it easier to just run asterisk
on the hardware without android. Doing it seriously via 3g is
probably not worthwhile. And bridging between voip and the cellular
voice channel is not supported on any of the current phones (no access
to in-call audio from the linux side).

If you mean the software platform on some other hardware (beagle
board?), maybe as a gui front end to configure something like
asterisk, that could be interesting... probably more a topic for the
android-porting list though.

You do know about asterisk embedded linux pbx, right?

Roman ( T-Mobile USA)

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Sep 23, 2009, 10:59:29 PM9/23/09
to Android Developers
"what T-Mobile USA's position is on allowing subscribers to run
SIP over the 3G network?"

T-Mobile has no restrictions on using SIP as a signaling protocol. As
already mentioned in my post, whether you are running a server or a
client, that you deal with the NAT traversal.

--
Roman Baumgaertner
Sr. SW Engineer-OSDC
·T· · ·Mobile· stick together
The views, opinions and statements in this email are those of the
author solely in their individual capacity, and do not necessarily
represent those of T-Mobile USA, Inc.

JoaJP

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Sep 24, 2009, 2:32:54 AM9/24/09
to Android Developers

Oh yeah Asterisk. I spent a few hours last year to build Asterisk for
ARM. On a Nokia N810, which runs proper Linux (Maemo), it ran right
out of the box, without any compromise. I am sure you can figure
what's on my holiday wish list. It'll be interesting to see how that
plays out on a carrier network. It's two, three years already that
orange kicked out a handful of MVNO's that sold SIP/RTP services on
orange's UMTS network, so it might actually work decent enough.
Personally, I've tried SIP/RTP on a UMTS network some three years ago,
and with limited testing only, I found pretty heavy latency.
Roman - in TCP/IP terms Asterisk isn't a server, it connects to
VoIP providers like a SIP client. AFAIK NAT traversal is an issue only
in a few special cases. Using a provider that supports IAX2 should
help, too.

Meanwhile at the ranch... From what I've seen, SipDroid isn't, to put
it mildly, up to snuff. As much as I would like to tackle such a
project, there's no solid case to commit resources to develop a SIP
client, considering how Google keeps coming out with their own apps
and telco solutions.
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