chmod unexpected permission error when logged into an actual device

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kooscar

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Oct 28, 2008, 7:42:46 PM10/28/08
to Android Developers

$ ls
ls
sqlite_stmt_journals
cache
sdcard
etc
init
default.prop
logo.rle
init.trout.rc
data
system
sys
proc
init.goldfish.rc
init.rc
sbin
root
dev
$ ls /data/
ls /data/
opendir failed, Permission denied
$ chmod 777 /data/
chmod 777 /data/
Unable to chmod /data/: Operation not permitted
$

I want to change the permission settings for the /data dir, but it
won't let me....

Justin (Google Employee)

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Oct 28, 2008, 8:24:18 PM10/28/08
to Android Developers
You can't do this on a device. On devices root is disabled.

Cheers,
Justin
Android Team @ Google

surferdude

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Oct 28, 2008, 9:00:27 PM10/28/08
to Android Developers
This is ridiculous, I bought into what I thought was a completely open
platform only to find out that its not. Google/HTC/T-Mobile needs to
give us a way of loading our own build on the device or else any hope
google had of making android mainstream will fail.
On Oct 28, 8:24 pm, "Justin (Google Employee)" <j...@google.com>
wrote:
> > won't let me....- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Shane Isbell

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Oct 28, 2008, 11:46:55 PM10/28/08
to android-d...@googlegroups.com
I have the same frustration. This is pretty bad. It is after all, my device. I wouldn't be happy if I got a computer from Dell and they told me I couldn't have admin access.

Shane

Justin (Google Employee)

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Oct 29, 2008, 11:31:23 AM10/29/08
to Android Developers
> Google/HTC/T-Mobile needs to
> give us a way of loading our own build on thedevice

This already exists. Just run 'adb install <YOUR_APP.apk>'.

Cheers,
Justin
Android Team @ Google

On Oct 28, 6:00 pm, surferdude <datruesur...@gmail.com> wrote:
> This is ridiculous, I boughtintowhat I thought was a completely open
> platform only to find out that its not. Google/HTC/T-Mobile needs to
> give us a way of loading our own build on thedeviceor else any hope
> google had of making android mainstream will fail.
> On Oct 28, 8:24 pm, "Justin (Google Employee)" <j...@google.com>
> wrote:
>
> > You can't do this on adevice. On devices root is disabled.
> > > Unable tochmod/data/: Operation not permitted
> > > $
>
> > > I want to change thepermissionsettings for the /data dir, but it

kooscar

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Oct 29, 2008, 1:23:40 PM10/29/08
to Android Developers
Justin,

Thanks for your reply, I really appreciate that.

However, based on your responses, is it safe to assume that Android
does not allow user manipulation of the file system and admin. related
behaviors aside from in/through application?

Practically speaking, something as simple as chmod 777 /data or ls /
data can only be done through an application?

Thank you,

Oscar




On Oct 29, 8:31 am, "Justin (Google Employee)" <j...@google.com>

surferdude

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Oct 29, 2008, 2:09:35 PM10/29/08
to Android Developers
You misunderstood me. I want to take the source code from
source.android.com, build it and flash it on to my device, so I can
have superuser privileges instead of being restricted by Google/T-
Mobile. Telling your developers that root access is disabled and still
calling the platform open is unacceptable.

On Oct 29, 11:31 am, "Justin (Google Employee)" <j...@google.com>

Mark Murphy

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Oct 29, 2008, 2:32:52 PM10/29/08
to android-d...@googlegroups.com
surferdude wrote:
> I want to take the source code from
> source.android.com, build it and flash it on to my device, so I can
> have superuser privileges instead of being restricted by Google/T-
> Mobile.

Whether the G1 accepts replacement firmware, and the process for doing
them, is a hardware question. HTC has a decent track record in this
regard, though I haven't seen a definitive statement one way or another
on the G1.

> Telling your developers that root access is disabled and still
> calling the platform open is unacceptable.

By your definition, Linux is not an open platform.

It is eminently possible to take Linux and install it on a device that
does not grant root access and is not designed to have its firmware
replaced by end users.

Take, for example, the TiVo. Getting root access on a TiVo, where
possible, is a royal pain, and replacing the TiVo software appears tor
require physically dismantling the unit, AFAIK. Yet, TiVo runs Linux.
Linux is open -- the TiVo is not. Similarly, Android is open -- the G1
may not be.

The Android "distro" that is installed by HTC on the G1 has root access
locked down. It is eminently likely that mainstream Android "distros" on
other devices distributed by major carriers will have root access locked
down. This should not preclude other device makers from offering Android
devices with root access, via their own patch to the Android source to
lift that restriction.

So, rolling all the way back to your statement of what you want, the
questions you'll need answers for are:

1. Which pieces of Android hardware will allow flashing of replacement
firmware, and is the G1 one of them?

2. Where in the Android source is the no-root lockdown implemented and,
if it's not configurable today as a build option, will the core Android
team accept a patch that *does* make it a build-time configuration
option, so those interested in root access can easily make firmware that
offers it?

#1 will determine how you can do it at all on hardware; #2 will
determine if this is perpetually a non-mainstream patch or if your
wishes and OHA's wishes can be met simultaneously.

--
Mark Murphy (a Commons Guy)
http://commonsware.com
_The Busy Coder's Guide to Android Development_ Version 1.3 Published!

hyc

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Oct 30, 2008, 12:26:25 PM10/30/08
to Android Developers
Since it's already known that there's an Over-the-air firmware update
available for the G1, it's obvious that the flash is reprogrammable.
If the question is whether there are other avenues, besides OTA, I
would expect that the source code should answer that...

On Oct 29, 11:32 am, Mark Murphy <mmur...@commonsware.com> wrote:
> surferdude wrote:

> So, rolling all the way back to your statement of what you want, the
> questions you'll need answers for are:
>
> 1. Which pieces of Android hardware will allow flashing of replacement
> firmware, and is the G1 one of them?

Jean-Baptiste Queru

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Oct 30, 2008, 12:42:15 PM10/30/08
to android-d...@googlegroups.com
Yes, there are other ways. You can drop a signed update image in
/sdcard/update.zip and have the recovery system flash it for you.

The code is here:
http://git.source.android.com/?p=platform/recovery.git;a=blob;f=recovery.c
(line 267).

JBQ

Michael

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Oct 31, 2008, 11:55:40 AM10/31/08
to Android Developers
What is it that you people think you need root access to the
underlying OS for?

Danny O'Brien

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Oct 31, 2008, 5:37:18 AM10/31/08
to Android Developers


On Oct 30, 9:42 am, "Jean-Baptiste Queru" <j...@google.com> wrote:
> Yes, there are other ways. You can drop a signed update image in
> /sdcard/update.zip and have the recovery system flash it for you.
>

What does signed mean in this context? Does the G1 accept only images
signed by HTC or T-Mobile, or can we sign with our own keys?

d.

> The code is here:http://git.source.android.com/?p=platform/recovery.git;a=blob;f=recov...

Justin (Google Employee)

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Oct 31, 2008, 2:09:48 PM10/31/08
to Android Developers
Danny,

The G1 is aimed at end users, not system developers. For user security
reasons the G1 will only accept properly signed system images. I'm not
sure, in this case, who 'owns' the key, whether it is the carrier or
the manufacturer, but one or both of them handle insuring system
images are signed.

Cheers,
Justin
Android Team @ Google

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