Editing Services

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tb...@my-dejanews.com

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Nov 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/19/98
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Is it common practice for a literary agency to offer editing services
for a fee aside from commission from sales?

Also, does anyone know how reputable the following literary agencies are:
O-Squared Literary Agency, University Heights, OH.
New Brand Agency Group, Coconut Creek, FL.
Lee Shore Agency, Ltd., Pittsburgh, PA.?

thanks.

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Kimcof

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Nov 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/19/98
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>Is it common practice for a literary agency to offer editing services
>for a fee aside from commission from sales?


No! If they're doing that they're doing the *book doctor* dance, and that's
how they make their money, not from actual book sales of clients they
represent. A *real* agent might say, "This needs some cleaning up, please do
so and then feel free to resubmit," but that's about as far as it goes. Get a
trusted friend or colleague to edit it for you separately (in other words,
don't let these guys *recommend* someone, they may have a deal where they get
cut in on the action) so that you're sure it's nice and tightly written, and
then resubmit.

Off the top of my head, I don't recognize these agencies you list. I have a
link somewhere that lists some reputable agencies. I'll dig it up and then
post it here.

Kim Olson

Freelance Writing and Editing Services
Email: Kim...@aol.com for rates and information

Elizabeth Burton

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Nov 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/19/98
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In article <730a9o$hjc$1...@nnrp1.dejanews.com> , tb...@my-dejanews.com wrote:

>Is it common practice for a literary agency to offer editing services
>for a fee aside from commission from sales?
>

>Also, does anyone know how reputable the following literary agencies are:
>O-Squared Literary Agency, University Heights, OH.
>New Brand Agency Group, Coconut Creek, FL.
>Lee Shore Agency, Ltd., Pittsburgh, PA.?
>
>thanks.

Books like the Writers Digest Writer's Market contain lists of reputable
literary agents and are an excellent source of information. A list is also
available via http://www.bookwire.com/aar/. Those on the list are members of
the Association of Authors' Representatives.

The following is from an article written by A.C. Crispin, who gave blanket
permission to any and all to pass it along to warn the unwary:

"1. If an agent charges a fee, they are highly suspect. I don't care what
they call it: reading fee, processing fee, contract fee, whatever...any kind
of fee is BAD. If an agent charges more than $50.00, I suggest you RUN AWAY.
Agents who charge fees in the hundreds of dollars make their money off
charging writers, NOT by selling their manuscripts to publishers. It's very
likely that after paying a large fee, your manuscript. will never even be
submitted to a real publisher.

2. If an agent refers you to a "book doctor" be very wary. Any agent that
says your ms. needs editing should provide you with a list of a number of
independent editors, and then allow you to pick the one you want to use.
There should be NO financial connection whatsoever between the agent and the
independent editor.

3. If an agent refers you to a co-op or subsidy press, RUN AWAY. No
reputable agent will do that.

4. If an agent you've never heard of solicits your work, that's not a good
sign. REAL literary agents have to fight off clients, not go out looking for
them. If an agent ADVERTISES via direct mail, the internet, or in writers'
magazines, back off!

5. If an agent has an office in some out-of-the-way place like Bumpass, West
Virginia, be VERY SUSPICIOUS. Most real agents operate out of New York or
California. There are exceptions, but if Agent X from Bent Fork, North
Dakota writes to you and begs to see your ms., chances are excellent he's a
crook. BE SMART!

6. Any reputable agent should be willing to provide you with a list of sales
and clients. Go to a bookstore and verify that these books and authors
exist. Check references. If an agent claims to be an AAR (Association of
Authors Representatives) member, go to the AAR site and look him/her up.
Fake agents have lied about this before.

7. If an agent tells you you're brilliant, and your book is sure to be a
bestseller, be wary. Real agents don't make statements like that -- at least
not to unknown authors."

Lisa Burton

Xanadu Scriveners: Copyediting, Proofreading, Critiques
http:// home.talkcity.com/LibraryDr/que
enalice/ editor.html

Becky Levine

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Nov 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/19/98
to
Everything I've heard, from some people who should know, is that if an agent
offers to edit your stuff for a fee, RUN! Apparently, its different if they
recommend that you get some editing done--they may have editors to refer you
to. I think that's a gray area, depending on the integrity of the agent--but
I think its getting more important to a publisher that a manuscript has been
thoroughly edited before they will consider it.

Becky Levine

tb...@my-dejanews.com wrote:

> Is it common practice for a literary agency to offer editing services
> for a fee aside from commission from sales?
>
> Also, does anyone know how reputable the following literary agencies are:
> O-Squared Literary Agency, University Heights, OH.
> New Brand Agency Group, Coconut Creek, FL.
> Lee Shore Agency, Ltd., Pittsburgh, PA.?
>
> thanks.
>

Bob Brooks

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Nov 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/19/98
to
A lot of them do it, but if you don't have to use that service don't. They
will tell you mostly things which will want to hear but it needs some work
(almost everything needs some work). If you have to use that service as
part of there representing you, run as fast as you can the other way. They
are out to take your money and will not do anything to get your hard work
published.

tb...@my-dejanews.com wrote in message <730a9o$hjc$1...@nnrp1.dejanews.com>...

Charles Kormos

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Nov 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/19/98
to
The Lee Shore Agency is a bunch of crooks.
They actually surf for bad messages about themselves on the web and then
harrass the poster for a retraction.
Send them at least $75 along with your manuscript and Cynthia Sterling will
call you on the telephone and try to con you into a vanity publishing or
editing service fee.
If you've heard of Edit Ink, The Lee Shore Agency is everything they are and
more.

Final word: Editorial services have no legitimate place in the book writing
business.


Members of the Comhairli Cairde

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Nov 19, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/19/98
to

Right on!!!
Frances
Association of Esoteric Writers. http://www.byoc.com/homepage/172988
--
Members of the Comhairli Cairde

CharlieDIY

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Nov 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/20/98
to
A. C. Crispin writes:

Excellent factual advice, except for two things: 50 bucks is too much to pay
to find out of the agent is a crook or not. Keep looking if ANY fee is
charged.

Bumpass is in Louisa County, VA, not WV.


Charlie Self
Word Worker

RDeschene

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Nov 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM11/20/98
to
Elizabeth Burton wrote:
>
> Books like the Writers Digest Writer's Market contain lists of reputable
> literary agents and are an excellent source of information. A list is also
> available via http://www.bookwire.com/aar/. Those on the list are members of
> the Association of Authors' Representatives.
>
> The following is from an article written by A.C. Crispin, who gave blanket
> permission to any and all to pass it along to warn the unwary:
>
<snip>

Thanks so much for this list! I've printed it out, and have added it to
my stacks of resource materials.

Sue

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