Re: flood coming to microsoft.public.bg.developer

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Peter Pearson

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Jan 23, 2008, 6:39:16 PM1/23/08
to
of
their vices. Later, a Commission of Inquiry into the working of this
Ordinance comments upon official statements as to the satisfactory
consequences of the enactment of the measure in the checking of
disease. The Commission demonstrates that in many instances their
statements were absolute falsehoods, as proved by statements made by
the same officials elsewhere. Since these officials are proved to have
been so untruthful after the passing of the Ordinance, we can put no
reliance on their statements previous to its enactments, and the
more so because the statistics for Hong Kong in its early days are
hopelessly confused with the general statistics for all China,
wherever British soldiers or sailors were to be found. Therefore they
are unavailable for citation. But as to statements made after the
passage of the Ordinance, we append a compilation, as set forth by Dr.
Birkbeck Nevins of Liverpool, England.

SHAMELESS AND YET OFFICIALLY-SANCTIONED FALSEHOOD IN PUBLISHING
OFFICIALLY UTTERLY UNTRUE STATISTICS IN FAVOUR OF THE C.D. ACTS IN
THE BRITISH COLONY OF HONG KONG WITH THE SANCTION AND AUTHORITY OF
THE COLONIAL GOVERNOR.

"Referring to the Colonial Surgeon's Department, we feel bound
to point out that those portions of the _Annual Medical Reports_
which refer to the subject of the Lock Hospital _have, in too many
instances, been altogether misleading_." (Report of Commission, p.
2, parag. 2.)

"In 1862 (five years after the Act had been in force) Dr. Murray
was '_completely satisfied_ with the _incalculable_ benefit that
had resulted to the colony from the Ordinance of 1857'"[A]

[Footnote A: An extreme form of C.D. Acts, without parallel in any
other place under British rule.]

"In 1865 (after eight years' experience) he wrote, 'the _good_ the
Ordinance does _is undoubted_; but the good it might d


Peter Pearson

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Jan 24, 2008, 3:39:53 PM1/24/08
to
be for ever; that sacrifice shall be eternal; that the
sceptre shall never depart from among them, because it shall not depart from
them till the eternal King comes.

Do all these passages indicate what is real? No. Do they then indicate what
is typical? No, but what is either real or typical. But the first passages,
excluding as they do reality, indicate that all this is only typical.

All these passages together cannot be applied to reality; all can be said to
be typical; therefore they are not spoken of reality, but of the type.

Agnus occisus est ab origine mundi.135 A sacrificing judge.

686. Contradictions.--The sceptre till the Messiah--without king or prince.

The eternal law--changed.

The eternal covenant--a new covenant.

Good laws--bad precepts. Ezekiel.

687. Types.--When the word of God, which is really true, is false literally,
it is true spiritually. Sede a dextris meis:136 this is false literally,
therefore it is true spiritually.

In these expressions, God is spoken of after the manner of men; and this
means nothing else but that the intention which men have in giving a


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