Re: SOFTWARE for SALE!!!                                                                 18553

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davi...@worldnewstonight.net

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Jan 21, 2008, 8:21:37 PM1/21/08
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My mother cried when she left me; it was very
hard to part. The big ship, 'City of Pekin,' took me soon out of
sight. I have heard that she is now dead. On arriving we did not
come ashore immediately. I was landed after 4 days. There was
trouble in landing me. I had a red paper, bought at Hong Kong,
that they called a certificate, and there was trouble about it.
The woman who bought me had no trouble getting ashore because she
had lived in California before. She told me what I was to say when
I was questioned. She told me I must swear I was her own daughter.
The Judge asked, 'Is this your own mother?' and I said, 'Yes.'
This was a lie, but I did not know it was wrong to do as I was
told, and I was afraid of my mistress. The Judge said, 'Did this
woman give you birth?' and I said, 'Yes.' The Judge said, 'Did
anybody tell you to say all this?" and I said, 'No,' because my
mistress had instructed me how to answer this question, if it was
asked me. She taught me on ship-board what to say if I was taken
to court. My mistress was an opium smoker, and she and her husband
had awful quarrels, which made her bad-tempered, and then she
would beat me for no reason. I used to get so tired working hard,
and then she would beat me. She beat me with thick sticks of
fire-wood. She would lay me on the bench, lift my clothes, and
beat me on the back. Another day she would beat me thus with the
fire tongs. One day she took a hot flat-iron, removed my clothes,
and held it on my naked back until I howled with pain. (There
was a large scab on her back from this burn when she came to the
Mission.) The scars on my body are proof of my bad treatment. My
forehead is all scars caused by her throwing heavy pieces of wood
at my head. One cut a large gash, and the blood ran out. She
stopped the bleeding and hid me away. She beat my legs one day
until they were all s


davi...@worldnewstonight.net

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Jan 23, 2008, 6:02:30 PM1/23/08
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of the two hours' confinement, while the brothel was being
searched for them. They were conveyed to the mission home, and were
very happy, and expressed their eager wish to remain. A Chinese
woman came to call at the mission home, in the absence of the
superintendent, and, unfortunately, was allowed to get access to an
acquaintance of these girls, and she conveyed to them a promise that
if they would come back, in a very little while they would all be
given their liberty. After that the girls said they wished to go, and
for the following reasons: They could not dwell in safety among their
Chinese people, if in debt to a brothel-keeper, for he would be always
on their track, and if he could not capture them and they would
not return, he would certainly secure their death at the hands of
high-binders. The case came up in court. The girls told there all the
details of their being recently smuggled into this country; that they
were bought by their present owner for $3,030 each; that they were
flogged when their earnings for their owner fell below $300 a month,
and other similar details,--_but_ they also declared their wish to go
back to the brothel and to their owner. To be sure, they had expressed
elsewhere a contrary wish, and the wish to return had been begotten in
their hearts by the threats and inducements conveyed to them by the
woman who came to the home. The judge was one who could not be bought
nor bribed, and who sincerely wished the good of


davi...@worldnewstonight.net

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Jan 23, 2008, 7:17:02 PM1/23/08
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common occurrence for little girls
to be bought and sold for immoral purposes. One of the group
has often heard the wretched blind girls singing just under her
window, on the river bank, and under conduct of the old
brothel-keeper, their owner, thus attracting custom. The
proportion of blind people in Oriental countries is much greater,
owing to the prevalence of eye diseases and the poverty and
ignorance of the people in coping with these, than in the West;
and as blind girls do not bring much money when disposed of as
wives, so they are sold in large numbers into a life of shame.
Poor little slaves! Because they are deprived of the natural light
of day, so they are destined never to see a ray of moral light
enter their miserable existence! We saw three or four little blind
girls who had been rescued, by these Christian workers, from their
terrible fate; but these are only a few rare exceptions out of the
thousands that are borne on into the tide of shame and anguish
continually."

Of the many girls we interviewed at Hong Kong the story of the
following seems typical of her class, so we extract it from our
journal:

"At the first place we called there were six inmates--four of whom
were present at the interview. The keeper went out of the room as
we entered, and did not


davi...@worldnewstonight.net

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Jan 24, 2008, 12:04:48 PM1/24/08
to
my father. Saint Paul in
the isle of Malta.

854. The hardness of the Jesuits, then, surpasses that of the Jews, since
those refused to believe Jesus Christ innocent only because they doubted if
His miracles were of God. Whereas the Jesuits, though unable to doubt that
the miracles of Port-Royal are of God, do not cease to doubt still the
innocence of that house.

855. I suppose that men believe miracles. You corrupt religion either in
favour of your friends or against your enemies. You arrange it at your will.

856. On the miracle.--As God has made no family more happy, let it also be
the case that He find none more thankful.

SECTION XIV: APPENDIX: POLEMICAL FRAGMENTS

857. Clearness, obscurity.--There would be too great darkness, if truth had
not visible signs. This is a wonderful one, that it has always been
preserved in one Church and one visible assembly of men. There would be too
great clearness, if there were only one opinion in this Church. But in order
to recognise what is true, one has only to look at what has always existed;
for it is certain that truth has always existed, and that nothing false has
always existed.

858. The history of the Church ought properly to be called the history of
truth.

859. There is a pleasure in being in a ship beaten about by a storm, when we
are sure that it will not founder. The persecutions which harass the Church


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