pronunciation of v in spanish

9 views
Skip to first unread message

sophie

unread,
Nov 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/29/99
to
What is the correct pronunciation of v in Spanish. Is it b.
or v. I am currently taking a Spanish class and the teacher
says it is absolutely incorrect to pronounce v as a b.
But all of my former teachers told me to say b for v. Cual
es la pronunciation correcta por favor?


* Sent from AltaVista http://www.altavista.com Where you can also find related Web Pages, Images, Audios, Videos, News, and Shopping. Smart is Beautiful

Dkcsac

unread,
Nov 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/29/99
to
>What is the correct pronunciation of v in Spanish. Is it b.
>or v. I am currently taking a Spanish class and the teacher
>says it is absolutely incorrect to pronounce v as a b.
>But all of my former teachers told me to say b for v. Cual
>es la pronunciation correcta por favor?

B and V stand for the same phoneme in Spanish. This is pronounced as a B (lips
closed) at the start of a sentence, and after an M or N or pause. In other
cases, it's pronounced with the lips slightly open, which sounds similar to a V
sound.

Derek Rogers

unread,
Nov 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/29/99
to
dkc...@aol.comnojungk (Dkcsac) wrote:

Absolutely right! To say that they "stand for the same phoneme" means
that using one instead of the other doesn't produce a different word -
it just sounds a little bit strange. Whether you use the closed-lips
sound or the open-lips sound depends not on what word it is, but on
the sounds round about.

So –erdad! is pronounced with the closed-lips sound, because the V is
at the start of the sentence. But in ‧s verdad! it's pronounced with
the open-lips sound, because it's not at the start of the sentence,
and not preceded by M or N.

Likewise 、uen! with B---, and ﹐uy buen! with ---V---.

It's a common mistake to think letter b is pronounced with closed lips
and letter v with open lips, but that isn't the case. Either can be
pronounced with either, according to the phonetic context.

Derek Rogers : http://www.derek.co.uk : Resources for Language Learners


Ray S. Elizondo

unread,
Nov 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/29/99
to

Depends where you are, but when I was in school, the two are different,
completely if you follow the Grammar. (which most do not do)

If you look in any dictionary, it says:

V = Ve labio/dental. This means your lower lip and your upper teeth.


B = B- labial, this means you use both lips closed.

Try it and you will hear the difference, but like I said it depends where
you are, just like English, completely different between Boston, and Texas.

Derek Rogers <de...@derek.co.uk> wrote in message
news:81v3g3$9e0$1...@supernews.com...

Brent Cullimore

unread,
Nov 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/29/99
to
This is a tad off the topic, but the differences between the "b" and
"v" sounds of the spanish "v" are very subtle, and in Mexico at least
it is very hard to distinguish between the two. So I've always
wondered when they are spelling a word how they distinguish between
the two letters.

My question was answered (perhaps?) during a recent trip to Mexico
when a taxista was telling me how he spells the name of his youngest
daughter, "Evett," and indicated it was "Evett" and not "Ebett" by
raising his fingers in a victory sign (v shape) when saying "v" to
make sure I didn't think it was a "b"

But then I still wonder how they distinguish between the two letters
when spelling over the phone.

A ver si los hispanoparlantes por allб me puedan ayudar.

Brent


On Mon, 29 Nov 1999 23:50:17 GMT, de...@derek.co.uk (Derek Rogers)
wrote:

>Absolutely right! To say that they "stand for the same phoneme" means
>that using one instead of the other doesn't produce a different word -
>it just sounds a little bit strange. Whether you use the closed-lips
>sound or the open-lips sound depends not on what word it is, but on
>the sounds round about.
>

>So ║Verdad! is pronounced with the closed-lips sound, because the V is
>at the start of the sentence. But in ║Es verdad! it's pronounced with


>the open-lips sound, because it's not at the start of the sentence,
>and not preceded by M or N.
>

>Likewise ║Buen! with B---, and ║Muy buen! with ---V---.


>
>It's a common mistake to think letter b is pronounced with closed lips
>and letter v with open lips, but that isn't the case. Either can be
>pronounced with either, according to the phonetic context.
>
>Derek Rogers : http://www.derek.co.uk : Resources for Language Learners
>

_______
_____ \| \\
// \| || || Cullimore and Ring Technologies, Inc.
|| | ||___// 9 Red Fox Lane
|| || \\ Littleton Colorado 80127-5710 USA
|| || \\ 303-971-0292, FAX 742-1540, br...@crtech.com
\\ || \\ www.crtech.com >
========================================================================== >
Thermal/Fluid System Design and Analysis >

Kalaninuiana`olekaumaiiluna Mondoy

unread,
Nov 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/29/99
to

Derek Rogers wrote:
>
> >B and V stand for the same phoneme in Spanish. This is pronounced as a B (lips
> >closed) at the start of a sentence, and after an M or N or pause. In other
> >cases, it's pronounced with the lips slightly open, which sounds similar to a V
> >sound.
>
> Absolutely right! To say that they "stand for the same phoneme" means
> that using one instead of the other doesn't produce a different word -
> it just sounds a little bit strange. Whether you use the closed-lips
> sound or the open-lips sound depends not on what word it is, but on
> the sounds round about.
>
> So ĄVerdad! is pronounced with the closed-lips sound, because the V is
> at the start of the sentence. But in ĄEs verdad! it's pronounced with

> the open-lips sound, because it's not at the start of the sentence,
> and not preceded by M or N.

Ah the wonders of linguistics. I think Derek nails it on the dot. It
usually depends on the position of the V or the B. In Spanish, the B
sound in between vowels does not require one to completely block the air
of the vocal tract, but the air is allowed to escape with friction known
as a fricative. The V soundis actually a fricative which makes these
two sounds similar. And as pointed out, intially the V sound is
pronounced with with the lips closed unless it follows an M. Don't know
about the N thing though. :-)

Kalani


4of5

unread,
Nov 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/29/99
to
In article <1710ec64...@usw-ex0109-069.remarq.com>, sophie
<cr_bryan...@stratec.ca.invalid> wrote:

=What is the correct pronunciation of v in Spanish. Is it b.
=or v. I am currently taking a Spanish class and the teacher
=says it is absolutely incorrect to pronounce v as a b.
=But all of my former teachers told me to say b for v. Cual
=es la pronunciation correcta por favor?
=
En español existen dos fonemas para ambas letras, la uve y la be. Una al
principio de palabra, se pronuncia como b, no importa con que letra se
escriba. vamos: bámos, barco, bárko. El otro fonema es la b intervocálica,
representada fonéticamente como una beta ß, que es tan suave que casi se
pronuncia como una w inglesa. Cubano: kußáno (Nunca kubáno), había:
aßía, etc.

Pronunciar la diferencia entre uve y be, como si fuera en inglés u otro
idioma que las diferencia es pura afectación ridícula, porque nadie habla
así salvo algunos locutores cursis de las cadenas televisivas euamericanas
en español, además de ser ignorancia, es pretencioso por ignorar como
habla el pueblo.
=* Sent from AltaVista http://www.altavista.com Where you can also find


related Web Pages, Images, Audios, Videos, News, and Shopping. Smart is
Beautiful

--
Go to http://www.gate.net/~ruhig
If you enjoy a different point of view: articles, sci-fi:
Captain Kirk Was an Idiot,
NEW: The Suicide of a Serial Killer, what may go through his mind.

Viggen

unread,
Nov 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/30/99
to

Ted Johnson wrote:

> Brent Cullimore wrote:
>
>> But then I still wonder how they distinguish between the two letters
>>
>> when spelling over the phone.
>
>

> Be de burro/Be grande = B
>
> Ve de vaca/Ve chica = V
>
> tj

Ve ?
UVE !
tambien hay quien dice
be alta/be baja
pero está igual de mal que lo de
ve grande/ve chica
para eso cada letra tiene su nombre,
Be / Uve

Viggen

unread,
Nov 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/30/99
to
>
> En español existen dos fonemas para ambas letras, la uve y la be. Una al
> principio de palabra, se pronuncia como b, no importa con que letra se
> escriba. vamos: bámos, barco, bárko. El otro fonema es la b intervocálica,
> representada fonéticamente como una beta ß, que es tan suave que casi se
> pronuncia como una w inglesa. Cubano: kußáno (Nunca kubáno), había:
> aßía, etc.
>

Me acuerdo que en el colegio, de pequeños, dijeron que la W se pronunciaba
como la B, -->
Wamba (típico ejemplo) se pronunciaría bamba, y no guamba


Jerry Friedman

unread,
Nov 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/30/99
to
In article <see-291199...@ip74.tallahasse7.fl.pub-ip.psi.net>,
s...@nospam.com (4of5) wrote:
...

> Pronunciar la diferencia entre uve y be, como si fuera en inglés u
otro
> idioma que las diferencia es pura afectación ridícula, porque nadie
habla
> así salvo algunos locutores cursis de las cadenas televisivas
euamericanas
> en español, además de ser ignorancia, es pretencioso por ignorar como
> habla el pueblo.

¡Gracias por la importantísima palabra "cursi"!

No tienes ninguna razón a saber esto (estoy tratando de decir, "There
was no reason for you to know this"), pero en el norte de Nuevo México y
Colorado se pronuncia la v con los dientes superiores tocando el labio
inferior, como en inglés. Nuestro instructor nos dijo que es la única
región hispanoblante donde se ocurre este sonido, y yo creo que tal vez
será la influencia del inglés. Él pronuncia "invierno" con una n y una
v como las del inglés "invade". Y él y muchos otros aquí pronuncian la
v y la b diferentemente una de otra ("differently from each other"?),
pero hay mucha variación.

Aquí los que pronuncian la v como en inglés no tienen nada de cursi.
Sin duda incluyen más leñadores a quienes les gusta la "lucha
profesional" que instructores de español y música folklorica. Hablan
mero como habla la gente.

--
Jerry Friedman
jfrE...@nnm.cc.nm.us
i before e
and all the disclaimers


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

Carlos Th

unread,
Nov 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/30/99
to
Viggen escribió:

> Ted Johnson wrote:
>
> > Be de burro/Be grande = B
> >
> > Ve de vaca/Ve chica = V
> >
> > tj
>
> Ve ?
> UVE !
> tambien hay quien dice
> be alta/be baja
> pero está igual de mal que lo de
> ve grande/ve chica
> para eso cada letra tiene su nombre,
> Be / Uve

Pero "uve" sólo se utiliza en España. En el resto del mundo hispano se
diferencia entre la be larga/grande/alta y la ve chica/pequeña/baja.

-- Carlos Th
================================O=O=====
Chlewey Thompin
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/9028
----------------------------------------

dov

unread,
Nov 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/30/99
to

Sophie:
La correcta pronunciación de la letra ve, es
la de la V de Victory.
La correcta pronunciación de la letra be, es la de la
B de Bárbara, esposa de Bach.
chau { ;-)
dov


sophie <cr_bryan...@stratec.ca.invalid> wrote in message
news:1710ec64...@usw-ex0109-069.remarq.com...


> What is the correct pronunciation of v in Spanish. Is it b.

> or v. I am currently taking a Spanish class and the teacher

> says it is absolutely incorrect to pronounce v as a b.

> But all of my former teachers told me to say b for v. Cual

> es la pronunciation correcta por favor?
>
>

dov

unread,
Nov 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/30/99
to
PROTESTO!
En mi vida no he dicho Verdad, con los labios
cerrados,
ni al principio, ni al final; la Verdad se grita con los labios abiertos, a
voz en cuello!
Claro que... cuando uno dice bajito... y bueno... dice bueno en voz baja,
con los
labios cerrados.
chau ;-)
dov
Brent Cullimore <br...@crtech.com> wrote in message
news:384307f8....@nntp.ix.netcom.com...

> This is a tad off the topic, but the differences between the "b" and
> "v" sounds of the spanish "v" are very subtle, and in Mexico at least
> it is very hard to distinguish between the two. So I've always
> wondered when they are spelling a word how they distinguish between
> the two letters.
>
> My question was answered (perhaps?) during a recent trip to Mexico
> when a taxista was telling me how he spells the name of his youngest
> daughter, "Evett," and indicated it was "Evett" and not "Ebett" by
> raising his fingers in a victory sign (v shape) when saying "v" to
> make sure I didn't think it was a "b"
>
> But then I still wonder how they distinguish between the two letters
> when spelling over the phone.
>
> A ver si los hispanoparlantes por all me puedan ayudar.

>
> Brent
>
>
> On Mon, 29 Nov 1999 23:50:17 GMT, de...@derek.co.uk (Derek Rogers)
> wrote:
>
> >Absolutely right! To say that they "stand for the same phoneme" means
> >that using one instead of the other doesn't produce a different word -
> >it just sounds a little bit strange. Whether you use the closed-lips
> >sound or the open-lips sound depends not on what word it is, but on
> >the sounds round about.
> >
> >So ¡Verdad! is pronounced with the closed-lips sound, because the V is
> >at the start of the sentence. But in ¡Es verdad! it's pronounced with

> >the open-lips sound, because it's not at the start of the sentence,
> >and not preceded by M or N.
> >

Vernon C Hammond

unread,
Nov 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/30/99
to
In article <821bev$vhp$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, Carlos Th <chl...@my-deja.com>
writes:

>> Ve ?
>> UVE !
>> tambien hay quien dice
>> be alta/be baja
>> pero está igual de mal que lo de
>> ve grande/ve chica
>> para eso cada letra tiene su nombre,
>> Be / Uve
>
>Pero "uve" sólo se utiliza en España. En el resto del mundo hispano se
>diferencia entre la be larga/grande/alta y la ve chica/pequeña/baja.
>
>-- Carlos Th
>================================O=

Carlos,,

En México los educados dicen 'uve' también - pero no todos y no siempre.

Y al pasar letras por teléfono dirían nombres, por ej. geográficos, como "Be"
de Bolivia o "ve" de Venezuela.

Vern


Vern
McAllen, TX 78501
& LaJoya, TX 78560

ignacio

unread,
Nov 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/30/99
to

dov escribió en mensaje <821ah7$r1o$1...@news2.inter.net.il>...

>
>Sophie:
> La correcta pronunciación de la letra ve, es
>la de la V de Victory.
> La correcta pronunciación de la letra be, es la de la
>B de Bárbara, esposa de Bach.
>chau { ;-)
>dov
>
>
>sophie <cr_bryan...@stratec.ca.invalid> wrote in message
>news:1710ec64...@usw-ex0109-069.remarq.com...
>> What is the correct pronunciation of v in Spanish. Is it b.
>> or v. I am currently taking a Spanish class and the teacher
>> says it is absolutely incorrect to pronounce v as a b.
>> But all of my former teachers told me to say b for v. Cual
>> es la pronunciation correcta por favor?
>>

Hola

Sabes Dov, lo que dices está bien, pero está mal.
Lo que te falta decir es que la V de Victory y la B de Bárbara, una prima
mía, se pronuncian igual.

Estoy totalmente de acuerdo con un mensaje de 4of5, no hay diferencias entre
ambos fonemas, la diferenciación se produce por pura afectación,
primeramente de los profesores de castellano y también por algunos locutores
que seguramente creen que así se habla correctamente (ultracorrección le
llaman a eso).

Te puedo citar fuentes:
Primero, Tomás Navarro Tomás en su manual de pronunciación indica la no
diferenciación de pronunciación de ambas letras.
Segundo, Amado Alonso (De la pronunciación medieval a la Española) acredita
que esa diferenciación jamás se produjo en castellano.

Por último, piensa en la multitud de faltas de ortografía que dan cuenta de
que la pronunciación de V y B coinciden.

chao

Ignacio

Ray S. Elizondo

unread,
Nov 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/30/99
to

Vernon tiene toda la razón, en todos los Colegios en México y aún escuelas
públicas, se le llama "uve" a la "V"
y como dice Vernon, la gente educada que ha tenido Escuala, le llaman a la
"W" igual que en España doble "uvé"


Vernon C Hammond <ver...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:19991130173529...@ngol07.aol.com...

Dkcsac

unread,
Dec 1, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/1/99
to
>No tienes ninguna razón a saber esto (estoy tratando de decir, "There
>was no reason for you to know this"), pero en el norte de Nuevo México y
>Colorado se pronuncia la v con los dientes superiores tocando el labio
>inferior, como en inglés. Nuestro instructor nos dijo que es la única
>región hispanoblante donde se ocurre este sonido, y yo creo que tal vez
>será la influencia del inglés.

He leído que esta pronunciación labiodental [v] también existe en California, y
también puede ser por la influencia del inglés.

4of5

unread,
Dec 1, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/1/99
to
... pero en el norte de Nuevo México y
=Colorado se pronuncia la v con los dientes superiores tocando el labio
=inferior, como en inglés. Nuestro instructor nos dijo que es la única
=región hispanoblante donde se ocurre este sonido, y yo creo que tal vez
=será la influencia del inglés. Él pronuncia "invierno" con una n y una
=v como las del inglés "invade". Y él y muchos otros aquí pronuncian la
=v y la b diferentemente una de otra ("differently from each other"?),
=pero hay mucha variación.
=
=Aquí los que pronuncian la v como en inglés no tienen nada de cursi.
=Sin duda incluyen más leñadores a quienes les gusta la "lucha
=profesional" que instructores de español y música folklorica. Hablan
=mero como habla la gente.

Es posible que en esas dos zonas particulares la diferenciación de la v y
de la b fuese producto de la influencia, no del inglés, sino del
castellano pre-reforma, que al igual del gallego, catalán, portugués y
otros idiomas ibéricos se pronuncia la diferencia. Por el aislamiento
(como el valle Sangre de Cristo, etc.) en que quedaron los españoles
inmigrantes esos sonidos pudieran haberse conservado.

Otra excepción fuera de la cursilería, es Chile, donde de forma
espontánea, algunas palabras principalmente la sílaba bi se pronuncia con
uve labiodental, es decir, los chilenos tienden a decir vicicleta, bevida,
etc. Eso es un desarrollo fonético espontáneo y natural, no forzado como
los locutores antes mencionados que sí lo hacen por pura ignorancia, a
propósito y por cursis.

4of5

unread,
Dec 1, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/1/99
to
Un ejemplo curioso y cómico. Hay algunos locutores de Miami, por ejemplo,
como Leticia Callava que cuando tiene los "idiot's cards" delante
pronuncias las uves tan exageradamente que a veces suenan como efes. Pero
cuando no tiene esas tarjetas con lo que tiene que decir se cuida mucho de
no hacerlo, porque si lo hace por no tener una ortografía perfecta tiende
a decir disparates como havía, etc.

In article <Xl014.2990$sS5.20091@maule>, "ignacio"
<sole...@ctcinternet.cl> wrote:

=dov escribió en mensaje <821ah7$r1o$1...@news2.inter.net.il>...
=>
=>Sophie:
=> La correcta pronunciación de la letra ve, es
=>la de la V de Victory.
=> La correcta pronunciación de la letra be, es la de la
=>B de Bárbara, esposa de Bach.
=>chau { ;-)
=>dov
=>
=>
=>sophie <cr_bryan...@stratec.ca.invalid> wrote in message
=>news:1710ec64...@usw-ex0109-069.remarq.com...
=>> What is the correct pronunciation of v in Spanish. Is it b.
=>> or v. I am currently taking a Spanish class and the teacher
=>> says it is absolutely incorrect to pronounce v as a b.
=>> But all of my former teachers told me to say b for v. Cual
=>> es la pronunciation correcta por favor?
=>>
=
=Hola
=
=Sabes Dov, lo que dices está bien, pero está mal.
=Lo que te falta decir es que la V de Victory y la B de Bárbara, una prima
=mía, se pronuncian igual.
=
=Estoy totalmente de acuerdo con un mensaje de 4of5, no hay diferencias entre
=ambos fonemas, la diferenciación se produce por pura afectación,
=primeramente de los profesores de castellano y también por algunos locutores
=que seguramente creen que así se habla correctamente (ultracorrección le
=llaman a eso).
=
=Te puedo citar fuentes:
=Primero, Tomás Navarro Tomás en su manual de pronunciación indica la no
=diferenciación de pronunciación de ambas letras.
=Segundo, Amado Alonso (De la pronunciación medieval a la Española) acredita
=que esa diferenciación jamás se produjo en castellano.
=
=Por último, piensa en la multitud de faltas de ortografía que dan cuenta de
=que la pronunciación de V y B coinciden.
=
=chao
=
= Ignacio

Jerry Friedman

unread,
Dec 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/3/99
to
In article <see-011299...@ip47.tallahasse7.fl.pub-ip.psi.net>,

s...@nospam.com (4of5) wrote:
> ... pero en el norte de Nuevo México y
> =Colorado se pronuncia la v con los dientes superiores tocando el
labio
> =inferior, como en inglés. Nuestro instructor nos dijo que es la
única
> =región hispanoblante donde se ocurre este sonido, y yo creo que tal
vez
> =será la influencia del inglés. Él pronuncia "invierno" con una n y
una
> =v como las del inglés "invade". Y él y muchos otros aquí pronuncian
la
> =v y la b diferentemente una de otra ("differently from each other"?),
> =pero hay mucha variación.
...

> Es posible que en esas dos zonas particulares la diferenciación de la
v y
> de la b fuese producto de la influencia, no del inglés, sino del
> castellano pre-reforma, que al igual del gallego, catalán, portugués y
> otros idiomas ibéricos se pronuncia la diferencia. Por el aislamiento
> (como el valle Sangre de Cristo, etc.) en que quedaron los españoles
> inmigrantes esos sonidos pudieran haberse conservado.

Es muy interesante. Conozco (¿sé? "I know of") un ejemplo de
conservación de prononciación arcaico aquí: la h que se pronuncia como j
(jallar, jumear, jediondo). Pero hay muchas pronunciaciones que son
modernos, como creo: el yeísmo, el seseo, la desaparición de las eses.

¿La v fue labiodental en el siglo 17?

No he oído hablar del "valle Sangre de Cristo". Si se mira desde aquí
hacia el este ver, se ve una sierra que se llama el Sangre de Cristo,
pero este valle se llama el valle del Río Grande (o Bravo). ¿Es lo que
quieres decir? Si alguién no lo sabe y se interesa, la sierra sigue una
línea desde el norte hacia el sur, y su nombre se refiere al color rojo
de las cimas que se ve desde el oeste (el lado primero poblado por los
españoles) a la puesta del sol. O así se dice... siendo medio daltónico
(¿daltoniquito?), no lo he visto nunca, aun cuando hay nieve.

<cortada una observación interestante sobre Chile>

--
Jerry Friedman
jfrE...@nnm.cc.nm.us
i before e
and all the disclaimers

ignacio

unread,
Dec 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/3/99
to

Jerry Friedman escribió en mensaje <8293dm$i5e$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>...

>In article <see-011299...@ip47.tallahasse7.fl.pub-ip.psi.net>,
> s...@nospam.com (4of5) wrote:
>> ... pero en el norte de Nuevo México y
>> =Colorado se pronuncia la v con los dientes superiores tocando el
>labio
>> =inferior, como en inglés. Nuestro instructor nos dijo que es la
>única
>> =región hispanoblante donde se ocurre este sonido, y yo creo que tal
>vez
>> =será la influencia del inglés. Él pronuncia "invierno" con una n y
>una
>> =v como las del inglés "invade". Y él y muchos otros aquí pronuncian
>la
>> =v y la b diferentemente una de otra ("differently from each other"?),
>> =pero hay mucha variación.
>...
>
>> Es posible que en esas dos zonas particulares la diferenciación de la
>v y
>> de la b fuese producto de la influencia, no del inglés, sino del
>> castellano pre-reforma, que al igual del gallego, catalán, portugués y
>> otros idiomas ibéricos se pronuncia la diferencia. Por el aislamiento
>> (como el valle Sangre de Cristo, etc.) en que quedaron los españoles
>> inmigrantes esos sonidos pudieran haberse conservado.
>
>¿La v fue labiodental en el siglo 17?
>
---------------------------------
Hola

Según Amado Alonso, hacia 1550 se confundían b y v en el Norte de España,
Hacia el 1600, la confusión entre ambas letras era general a toda la
península.
Todo esto según escritos que él ha recogido.

Ignacio

dov

unread,
Dec 4, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/4/99
to
Estoy totalmente confundido.
Siempre supe que la letra V, llamada *ve* o *ve corta*, se pronuncia
tocando con el labio superior el filo de los dientes inferiores;
la letra B, llamada *be* o *be larga*, se pronuncia con los labios cerrados,
y así nos enseñaron en el Buenos Aires, allí por los 50', sin ninguna
afectación, y lo puedes escuchar en los tangos de entonces.
Consulté el DRAE y el VOX (of-line) y de ahí mi sorpresa: nunca escuché
el nombre UVE, y para colmo de males, dicen que no hay diferencia en la
pronunciación, ni en España ni en Latinoamérica; que desgracia, parece
que soy marciano, nomás.
Si alguien tiene idea cuando y como se han producido estos cambios
que me han convertido en marciano, le escucharé con toda mi atención.
chau
dov


Jerry Friedman <jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:820uuf$lne$1...@nnrp1.deja.com...
> In article <see-291199...@ip74.tallahasse7.fl.pub-ip.psi.net>,
> s...@nospam.com (4of5) wrote:
> ...
>


> > Pronunciar la diferencia entre uve y be, como si fuera en inglés u
> otro
> > idioma que las diferencia es pura afectación ridícula, porque nadie
> habla
> > así salvo algunos locutores cursis de las cadenas televisivas
> euamericanas
> > en español, además de ser ignorancia, es pretencioso por ignorar como
> > habla el pueblo.
>
> ¡Gracias por la importantísima palabra "cursi"!
>

> No tienes ninguna razón a saber esto (estoy tratando de decir, "There

> was no reason for you to know this"), pero en el norte de Nuevo México y


> Colorado se pronuncia la v con los dientes superiores tocando el labio

> inferior, como en inglés. Nuestro instructor nos dijo que es la única

> región hispanoblante donde se ocurre este sonido, y yo creo que tal vez

> será la influencia del inglés. Él pronuncia "invierno" con una n y una

> v como las del inglés "invade". Y él y muchos otros aquí pronuncian la

> v y la b diferentemente una de otra ("differently from each other"?),

> pero hay mucha variación.
>


> Aquí los que pronuncian la v como en inglés no tienen nada de cursi.

> Sin duda incluyen más leñadores a quienes les gusta la "lucha

> profesional" que instructores de español y música folklorica. Hablan

> mero como habla la gente.
>

Carlos Th

unread,
Dec 4, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/4/99
to
In article <829jbr$ql8$1...@news2.inter.net.il>,

"dov" <ru...@kibutzdan.co.il> wrote:
> Estoy totalmente confundido.
> Siempre supe que la letra V, llamada *ve* o *ve corta*, se pronuncia
> tocando con el labio superior el filo de los dientes inferiores;
> la letra B, llamada *be* o *be larga*, se pronuncia con los labios
> cerrados, y así nos enseñaron en el Buenos Aires, allí por los 50',
> sin ninguna afectación, y lo puedes escuchar en los tangos de
> entonces.
> Consulté el DRAE y el VOX (of-line) y de ahí mi sorpresa: nunca
> escuché el nombre UVE, y para colmo de males, dicen que no hay
> diferencia en la pronunciación, ni en España ni en Latinoamérica; que
> desgracia, parece que soy marciano, nomás.
> Si alguien tiene idea cuando y como se han producido estos cambios
> que me han convertido en marciano, le escucharé con toda mi atención.
> chau
> dov

Creo que el problema es lo que se conoce como hipercorrección (corregir
algo que no está mal por evitar un error común). Que en este caso ha
sido perpetuado, y no sólo en Argentina, por la escuela.

Sí, yo también creo acordarme de profesores de español en mi colegio
enseñando la {v} como labidental. Pero el grueso de la población no lo
hace y no es un fenómeno reciente... la fusión de la {b} y la {v} se
produjo hace ya varios siglos, e incluso creo que antes de la conquista
de América ya los castellanos no la distinguían.

Simplemente que las personas de letras, y posiblemente aún más los que
aprendían francés e inglés, han insistido en diferenciarlas, pero es
una diferencia artificial. Los mismos profesores que la enseñan no la
usan fuera de las aulas o cuando hablan sin leer y usualmente aquellas
personas que insisten en pronunciarlas diferente suenan afectados.
(Cursis dicen algunos en el grupo.)

Estoy seguro que cuando a Dov le enseñaron la diferencia entre la {v}
como /v/ y la {b} como /b/, los cantantes de tango y los profesores de
castellano las distinguían ("es la forma culta") pero el grueso de la
población no ("es la pronunciación vulgar"). Pero por mucho tiempo
existió también en Argentina libros que prescribían en contra del uso
de "vos" y apostaría que Dov también se habrá topado con algún profesor
que inisitía en que sus alumnos hablaran de "tú".

--


================================O=O=====
Chlewey Thompin
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/9028
----------------------------------------

Jerry Friedman

unread,
Dec 4, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/4/99
to
In article <82bbd9$13n$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

Carlos Th <chl...@my-deja.com> wrote:
> In article <829jbr$ql8$1...@news2.inter.net.il>,
> "dov" <ru...@kibutzdan.co.il> wrote:
...

> > Consulté el DRAE y el VOX (of-line) y de ahí mi sorpresa: nunca
> > escuché el nombre UVE, y para colmo de males, dicen que no hay
> > diferencia en la pronunciación, ni en España ni en Latinoamérica;
que
> > desgracia, parece que soy marciano, nomás.
> > Si alguien tiene idea cuando y como se han producido estos cambios
> > que me han convertido en marciano, le escucharé con toda mi
atención.

¿No te fijaste en que te trajeron a un mundo sin agua ni Navidad ni
carne de puerco, donde se habla una lengua absolutamente extranjera?
...

> Simplemente que las personas de letras, y posiblemente aún más los que
> aprendían francés e inglés, han insistido en diferenciarlas, pero es

> una diferencia artificial.¿En la Argentina sería posible que el

¿En la Argentina sería posible que el italiano también tuviera una
influencia?

--
Jerry Friedman
jfrE...@nnm.cc.nm.us
i before e
and all the disclaimers

Les agradeceré a los que me corrijan las equivocaciones.

Angelico

unread,
Dec 4, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/4/99
to
On Fri, 3 Dec 1999 03:25:08 -0200, "ignacio" <sole...@ctcinternet.cl>
wrote:

=
=Jerry Friedman escribió en mensaje <8293dm$i5e$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>...
=>In article <see-011299...@ip47.tallahasse7.fl.pub-ip.psi.net>,
=> s...@nospam.com (4of5) wrote:
=>> ... pero en el norte de Nuevo México y
=>> =Colorado se pronuncia la v con los dientes superiores tocando el
=>labio
=>> =inferior, como en inglés. Nuestro instructor nos dijo que es la
=>única
=>> =región hispanoblante donde se ocurre este sonido, y yo creo que tal
=>vez
=>> =será la influencia del inglés. Él pronuncia "invierno" con una n y
=>una
=>> =v como las del inglés "invade". Y él y muchos otros aquí pronuncian
=>la
=>> =v y la b diferentemente una de otra ("differently from each other"?),
=>> =pero hay mucha variación.
=>...
=>
=>> Es posible que en esas dos zonas particulares la diferenciación de la
=>v y
=>> de la b fuese producto de la influencia, no del inglés, sino del
=>> castellano pre-reforma, que al igual del gallego, catalán, portugués y
=>> otros idiomas ibéricos se pronuncia la diferencia. Por el aislamiento
=>> (como el valle Sangre de Cristo, etc.) en que quedaron los españoles
=>> inmigrantes esos sonidos pudieran haberse conservado.
=>
=>¿La v fue labiodental en el siglo 17?
=>
=---------------------------------
=Hola
=
=Según Amado Alonso, hacia 1550 se confundían b y v en el Norte de España,
=Hacia el 1600, la confusión entre ambas letras era general a toda la
=península.
=Todo esto según escritos que él ha recogido.
=
=Ignacio
=
Según tengo entendido, en la península Ibérica la confusión de b y v
es general desde que los romanos llegaron por aquí. Había un refrán
latino que decía algo como "Beati hispani [para quienes] bibere vivere
est". La parte entre corchetes está en castellano porque no recuerdo
cómo era ni sé latín suficiente para reconstruirlo. Viene a decir que
"felices los hispanos para quienes beber es vivir", haciendo
referencia a la incapacidad de diferenciar tales sonidos para los
habitantes de las Hispania romana. Según parece, las lenguas
prerromanas no incluían el fonema 'v', por ejemplo el vasco sigue sin
usarlo, ni se considera en los estudios del dialecto central del
ibero. El que se distinga en algunas zonas de la península como
Portugal o ciertas comarcas valencianas (no sé de otros lugares) puede
ser un desarrollo posterior, una mayor romanización o la influencia de
otras lenguas, como el francés o las lenguas de las tribus germánicas
que llegaron con la desintegración del imperio romano. Estas dos
últimas posibilidades podrían servir para el portugués, que el siglo
pasado tomó del francés la pronunciación de la 'r'.
--
Angel Arnal
Valencia, España
ICQ# 49213241
Remove my opinion on spam to e-mail me.

4of5

unread,
Dec 5, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/5/99
to
In article <8293dm$i5e$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, Jerry Friedman
<jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote:

=> Es posible que en esas dos zonas particulares la diferenciación de la

=v y


=> de la b fuese producto de la influencia, no del inglés, sino del
=> castellano pre-reforma, que al igual del gallego, catalán, portugués y
=> otros idiomas ibéricos se pronuncia la diferencia. Por el aislamiento
=> (como el valle Sangre de Cristo, etc.) en que quedaron los españoles
=> inmigrantes esos sonidos pudieran haberse conservado.
=

=Es muy interesante. Conozco (¿sé? "I know of") un ejemplo de
=conservación de prononciación arcaico [pronunciación arcaica] aquí: la h


que se pronuncia como j

=(jallar, jumear, jediondo).

Ésa es una influencia andaluza.

=Pero hay muchas pronunciaciones que son
=modernos, [modernas] como creo: el yeísmo, [influencia andaluza]

La ese andaluza cuando va al final de una palabra o delante de consonante
se pronuncia comoun h aspirada: las casas: lah casah. Algunos poetas
andaluces la escriben con j, como laj casaj, ya que en Andalucía, como en
gran parte de América la j es muy suave.


el seseo, la desaparición de las eses.

la z como th fue introducida después de la reforma, nunca antes existió
ese sonido en castellano.
Las informaciones sobre esta reforma son extremadamente difíciles de
buscar porque se trató de ocultar por razones políticas. Éstas tenía una
intención oculta, además de facilitar a los indios el aprendizaje del
castellano: la de distinguir esta lengua de otras lenguas como el gallego
o catalán, ya que al desaparecer los sonidos de zh, z, sh, e incluir uno
tan extraño como th, la diferencia al oído entre los que hablaban
castellano reformado o una lengua prohibida era notable y punible.

Una buena fuente para entender la pronunciación del castellano del tiempo
del descubrimiento es el ladino (de latino) o paquetilla que hablaban los
judíos que salieron de España en aquella época y que, por un milagro
lingüístico todavía hablan sus descendientes en Turquía, Israel y otras
partes. En Jerusalén se publica un periódico en paquetilla (también
conocido con españolit), la Luz, que usa la fonética turca, que es la que
saben lo jóvenes. Yo publiqué aquí un fragmento. La pronunciación del
españolit es más parecida al castellano original que el castellano actual.

=
=¿La v fue labiodental en el siglo 17?

Parece que nunca hubo una diferenciación clara en castellano, la
ortografía era muy errática, lo mismo escribían huvo que hubo. Los
escribas parecen que no lograban captar la b intervocálica del castellano.

=
=No he oído hablar del "valle Sangre de Cristo". Si se mira desde aquí
=hacia el este ver, se ve una sierra que se llama el Sangre de Cristo,
=pero este valle se llama el valle del Río Grande (o Bravo). ¿Es lo que
=quieres decir?

Posiblemente, esta información la saqué de la memoria que no siempre es
confiable.

Cualquier respuesta a este mensaje por favor, hacerla a rolf...@yahoo.com

Si alguién no lo sabe y se interesa, la sierra sigue una

=línea desde el norte hacia el sur, y su nombre se refiere al color rojo
=de las cimas que se ve desde el oeste (el lado primero poblado por los
=españoles) a la puesta del sol. O así se dice... siendo medio daltónico
=(¿daltoniquito?), no lo he visto nunca, aun cuando hay nieve.
=
=<cortada una observación interestante sobre Chile>
=
=--
=Jerry Friedman
=jfrE...@nnm.cc.nm.us
=i before e
=and all the disclaimers
=
=
=Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
=Before you buy.

dov

unread,
Dec 5, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/5/99
to
De una cosa puedes estar seguro, el tango, en el 99,99% de los casos
no usa una palabra que no es usada por el vulgo, y, aunque aprendimos
el español *fino* no lo usabamos, y nadie mas lejos de mí, que tengo que
hacer esfuerzos permanentes para decir *puedes* y no *podés*, y lo hago
porque
considero que para comunicarme por este medio, debo tratar de usar un
*castellano* que sea lo más universal posible.
´Por el otro lado, yo escribía en este idioma en la misma forma que lo
hablaba, y sin errores de ortografía, aún hoy, después de no haber usado
el español durante unos 20 años, puedo volver a él con relativa facilidad,
y no creo que encuentres errores entre b y v , por la simple razón, que
contra la resolución de la RAE, parece que si existen comunidades que
en tiempos determinados, aunque no diferenciaran la ese de la zeta,
si mantuvieron esta diferencia como la diferencia entre la elle y la ye.
Lo que en tu pueblo se considera cursi, en el día de hoy, fué, y que no te
quepa duda, la forma de hablar de los guapos de Buenos Aires, y me
gustaría ver quién se atreve a tratarlos de cursis cara acara.
chau
dov
{ ;-() > preguntate porqué uso el chau y mi nombre con minúscula.
Carlos Th <chl...@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:82bbd9$13n$1...@nnrp1.deja.com...

> In article <829jbr$ql8$1...@news2.inter.net.il>,
> "dov" <ru...@kibutzdan.co.il> wrote:
> > Estoy totalmente confundido.
> > Siempre supe que la letra V, llamada *ve* o *ve corta*, se pronuncia
> > tocando con el labio superior el filo de los dientes inferiores;
> > la letra B, llamada *be* o *be larga*, se pronuncia con los labios
> > cerrados, y así nos enseñaron en el Buenos Aires, allí por los 50',
> > sin ninguna afectación, y lo puedes escuchar en los tangos de
> > entonces.
> > Consulté el DRAE y el VOX (of-line) y de ahí mi sorpresa: nunca
> > escuché el nombre UVE, y para colmo de males, dicen que no hay
> > diferencia en la pronunciación, ni en España ni en Latinoamérica; que
> > desgracia, parece que soy marciano, nomás.
> > Si alguien tiene idea cuando y como se han producido estos cambios
> > que me han convertido en marciano, le escucharé con toda mi atención.
> > chau
> > dov
>
> Creo que el problema es lo que se conoce como hipercorrección (corregir
> algo que no está mal por evitar un error común). Que en este caso ha
> sido perpetuado, y no sólo en Argentina, por la escuela.
>
> Sí, yo también creo acordarme de profesores de español en mi colegio
> enseñando la {v} como labidental. Pero el grueso de la población no lo
> hace y no es un fenómeno reciente... la fusión de la {b} y la {v} se
> produjo hace ya varios siglos, e incluso creo que antes de la conquista
> de América ya los castellanos no la distinguían.
>
> Simplemente que las personas de letras, y posiblemente aún más los que
> aprendían francés e inglés, han insistido en diferenciarlas, pero es
> una diferencia artificial. Los mismos profesores que la enseñan no la
> usan fuera de las aulas o cuando hablan sin leer y usualmente aquellas
> personas que insisten en pronunciarlas diferente suenan afectados.
> (Cursis dicen algunos en el grupo.)
>
> Estoy seguro que cuando a Dov le enseñaron la diferencia entre la {v}
> como /v/ y la {b} como /b/, los cantantes de tango y los profesores de
> castellano las distinguían ("es la forma culta") pero el grueso de la
> población no ("es la pronunciación vulgar"). Pero por mucho tiempo
> existió también en Argentina libros que prescribían en contra del uso
> de "vos" y apostaría que Dov también se habrá topado con algún profesor
> que inisitía en que sus alumnos hablaran de "tú".
>
> --
> ================================O=O=====
> Chlewey Thompin
> http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/9028
> ----------------------------------------
>
>

dov

unread,
Dec 5, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/5/99
to
Jerry: Te equivocas, entre los 33 *olim* que viajaron junto conmigo a
Israel, mis
dos hijos y yo fuimos los únicos que no hicieron la *cola* (de 5 en fondo)
para conseguir los pasaportes, legales *ojo*, y un oficial de la policía me
lo trajo a la oficina para que no me molestara en ir a retirarlos, todo
gracias a un almirante
que era uno de los directores de la empresa internacional en la que
trabajaba.
Yo sabía muy bien donde iba, (o creía saberlo), llegue en plena noche, y a
la
mañana temprano, en Beer Sheva, en el desierto del Neguev, salí al balcón
del 2º piso para ver el panorama y lo que ví era sí, un desierto, pero un
desierto
sembrado de filas, y mas filas de cruces blancas...

Jerry Friedman <jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote in message

news:82bm78$7rq$1...@nnrp1.deja.com...


> In article <82bbd9$13n$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
> Carlos Th <chl...@my-deja.com> wrote:

> > In article <829jbr$ql8$1...@news2.inter.net.il>,
> > "dov" <ru...@kibutzdan.co.il> wrote:

> ...


> > > Consulté el DRAE y el VOX (of-line) y de ahí mi sorpresa: nunca
> > > escuché el nombre UVE, y para colmo de males, dicen que no hay
> > > diferencia en la pronunciación, ni en España ni en Latinoamérica;
> que
> > > desgracia, parece que soy marciano, nomás.
> > > Si alguien tiene idea cuando y como se han producido estos cambios
> > > que me han convertido en marciano, le escucharé con toda mi
> atención.
>

> ¿No te fijaste en que te trajeron a un mundo sin agua ni Navidad ni
> carne de puerco, donde se habla una lengua absolutamente extranjera?
> ...
>

> > Simplemente que las personas de letras, y posiblemente aún más los que
> > aprendían francés e inglés, han insistido en diferenciarlas, pero es

> > una diferencia artificial.¿En la Argentina sería posible que el
>
> ¿En la Argentina sería posible que el italiano también tuviera una
> influencia?

No tengo la menor idea como se usa la ve y la be en italiano, en general
las palabras del italiano las tomabamos completas, un poco las
arruínabamos,pero nada mas.
La influencia del francés y del inglés era casi nula en aquella época,
después
de estudiar mucho, y tambien hacer el ejercito, me dí cuenta que estábamos
muy influenciados por el alemán, no en forma directa, pero si a traves de
traducciones,
casi toda la técnica provenía de traducciones del aleman.
chau
dov

> --
> Jerry Friedman
> jfrE...@nnm.cc.nm.us
> i before e
> and all the disclaimers
> Les agradeceré a los que me corrijan las equivocaciones.
>
>

ignacio

unread,
Dec 5, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/5/99
to

4of5 escribió en mensaje ...

>In article <8293dm$i5e$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, Jerry Friedman
><jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>
>
>la z como th fue introducida después de la reforma, nunca antes existió
>ese sonido en castellano.
>Las informaciones sobre esta reforma son extremadamente difíciles de
>buscar porque se trató de ocultar por razones políticas. Éstas tenía una
>intención oculta, además de facilitar a los indios el aprendizaje del
>castellano: la de distinguir esta lengua de otras lenguas como el gallego
>o catalán, ya que al desaparecer los sonidos de zh, z, sh, e incluir uno
>tan extraño como th, la diferencia al oído entre los que hablaban
>castellano reformado o una lengua prohibida era notable y punible.
>


Hola

Me llama la atención tu observacion


"la z como th fue introducida después de la reforma, nunca antes existió
>ese sonido en castellano"

¿Es posible que un fonema sea introducido en una lengua?
El pueblo chileno conoce una frase:
"la historia es nuestra y la hacen los pueblos".

Según te entiendo la pronunciación z como th inglesa más bien parece debida
a un complot.
Pero, ¿es posible hacer esto?
¿acaso las lenguas no tienen una evolución incontrolable por los grupos de
poder, especialmente en la época de la famosa Reforma, en que nadie sabía
mucho de fonética, ni de fonología?
Piensa todo el tiempo que nos vienen machacando con la diferencia entre V y
B, sin embargo no hacemos esa distinción por más que lo quieran los
profesores y los preocupados por el bien-hablar.
"la lengua es nuestra y la hacen los pueblos"

La descripción de z con sonido "ciceante" recién aparece en gramáticas del
siglo XIX y se piensa que se estableció plenamente a mediados del siglo
XVIII, después de una evolución que se cree iniciada en el siglo XVI.

Chao


Ignacio

4of5

unread,
Dec 5, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/5/99
to
In article <jVB24.139$yD5.3315@maule>, "ignacio" <sole...@ctcinternet.cl>
wrote:

=4of5 escribió en mensaje ...
=>In article <8293dm$i5e$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, Jerry Friedman
=><jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote:
=>
=>
=>la z como th fue introducida después de la reforma, nunca antes existió
=>ese sonido en castellano.
=>Las informaciones sobre esta reforma son extremadamente difíciles de
=>buscar porque se trató de ocultar por razones políticas. Éstas tenía una
=>intención oculta, además de facilitar a los indios el aprendizaje del
=>castellano: la de distinguir esta lengua de otras lenguas como el gallego
=>o catalán, ya que al desaparecer los sonidos de zh, z, sh, e incluir uno
=>tan extraño como th, la diferencia al oído entre los que hablaban
=>castellano reformado o una lengua prohibida era notable y punible.
=>
=
=
=Hola
=
=Me llama la atención tu observacion
="la z como th fue introducida después de la reforma, nunca antes existió
=>ese sonido en castellano"
=
=¿Es posible que un fonema sea introducido en una lengua?
=El pueblo chileno conoce una frase:
="la historia es nuestra y la hacen los pueblos".
=
=Según te entiendo la pronunciación z como th inglesa más bien parece debida
=a un complot.
=Pero, ¿es posible hacer esto?
=¿acaso las lenguas no tienen una evolución incontrolable por los grupos de
=poder, especialmente en la época de la famosa Reforma, en que nadie sabía
=mucho de fonética, ni de fonología?
=Piensa todo el tiempo que nos vienen machacando con la diferencia entre V y
=B, sin embargo no hacemos esa distinción por más que lo quieran los
=profesores y los preocupados por el bien-hablar.
="la lengua es nuestra y la hacen los pueblos"
=
=La descripción de z con sonido "ciceante" recién aparece en gramáticas del
=siglo XIX y se piensa que se estableció plenamente a mediados del siglo
=XVIII, después de una evolución que se cree iniciada en el siglo XVI.
=
=Chao
=
=
=Ignacio

Todo esto parece muy bien, Ignacio, pero NO EXISTE fácil información sobre
este «problema» YO hace tiempo leí un libro muy bien documentado sobre
este problema. Estaba en una biblioteca privada y como pasaron muchas
cosas después de eso, lo tomé como una sencilla información y no le di la
relevancia que de verdad tiene. Tal información tiene enemigos en los
castellanos, por ejemplo, para no admitir que fue algo contra los gallegos
y catalanes y en los catalanes, porque tendría que dejar de hacerse las
víctimas lingüísticas, ya que las verdaderas víctimas lingüísticas fueron
los castellanos.

Dkcsac

unread,
Dec 6, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/6/99
to
>la z como th fue introducida después de la reforma, nunca antes existió
ese sonido en castellano.

Hace cinco siglos o más, la z se pronunciaba como ts, o sea como la z italiana
o alemana. Poco a poco, la lengua salía cada vez más, hasta que el sonido th
resultó. Quizás esto fue para distinguir mejor la z de la s. En algunos
dialectos, mucha gente no quería distinguir la z de la s, o tenía dificultad en
distinguirlas, y el seseo resultó.

Jerry Friedman

unread,
Dec 6, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/6/99
to
In article <lt024.73$_I3.1868@maule>,

"ignacio" <sole...@ctcinternet.cl> wrote:
>
> Jerry Friedman escribió en mensaje <8293dm$i5e$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>...
> >> ... pero en el norte de Nuevo México y
> >> =Colorado se pronuncia la v con los dientes superiores tocando el
> >labio

> >> =inferior, como en inglés. Nuestro instructor nos dijo que es la
> >única

> >> =región hispanoblante donde se ocurre este sonido, y yo creo que
tal
> >vez

> >> =será la influencia del inglés. Él pronuncia "invierno" con una n
y
> >una

> >> =v como las del inglés "invade". Y él y muchos otros aquí
pronuncian
> >la

> >> =v y la b diferentemente una de otra ("differently from each
other"?),
> >> =pero hay mucha variación.
> >...
> >
> >> Es posible que en esas dos zonas particulares la diferenciación de
la
> >v y

> >> de la b fuese producto de la influencia, no del inglés, sino del
> >> castellano pre-reforma, que al igual del gallego, catalán,
portugués y
> >> otros idiomas ibéricos se pronuncia la diferencia. Por el
aislamiento
> >> (como el valle Sangre de Cristo, etc.) en que quedaron los
españoles
> >> inmigrantes esos sonidos pudieran haberse conservado.
> >
> >¿La v fue labiodental en el siglo 17?
> >
> ---------------------------------
> Hola

>
> Según Amado Alonso, hacia 1550 se confundían b y v en el Norte de
España,
> Hacia el 1600, la confusión entre ambas letras era general a toda la
> península.

> Todo esto según escritos que él ha recogido.

Es la fecha crítica, porque los primeros pobladores españoles llegaron
aquí en 1598 (dirigido por el asesino y mutilador don Juan de Oñate).
Pero ya que llegaron de México, el dialecto de México seria el
importante, si era diferente.

Los indígenas aquí currieron a los españoles en 1680, y éstos no
regresaron hasta 1692, pues tal vez 1692 es la fecha crítica. Pero de
lo que dijo Angelico, tal vez no importa.


--
Jerry Friedman
jfrE...@nnm.cc.nm.us
i before e
and all the disclaimers

dov

unread,
Dec 6, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/6/99
to
Ignacio:
Sí, las lenguas pertenecen a los pueblos, pero es norma que los
pueblos no siempre son libres, y aunque los ejemplos de prohibiciones
y obligaciones no parezca real, es un hecho, que grupos mayoritarios
hicieron desaparecer idiomas completos de grupos minoritarios, y
viceversa, más de una vez, la intención es loable, por ejemplo, intentar
la integración de distintos grupos en un pueblo unido, aunque, en general
el grupo que pierde su idioma, pierde también su idiosincracia, y se
convierte en un subgrupo marginal del nuevo pueblo integrado.
chau
dov
ignacio <sole...@ctcinternet.cl> wrote in message
news:jVB24.139$yD5.3315@maule...

>
> 4of5 escribió en mensaje ...
> >In article <8293dm$i5e$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, Jerry Friedman
> ><jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote:
> >
> >
> >la z como th fue introducida después de la reforma, nunca antes existió
> >ese sonido en castellano.
> >Las informaciones sobre esta reforma son extremadamente difíciles de
> >buscar porque se trató de ocultar por razones políticas. Éstas tenía una
> >intención oculta, además de facilitar a los indios el aprendizaje del
> >castellano: la de distinguir esta lengua de otras lenguas como el gallego
> >o catalán, ya que al desaparecer los sonidos de zh, z, sh, e incluir uno
> >tan extraño como th, la diferencia al oído entre los que hablaban
> >castellano reformado o una lengua prohibida era notable y punible.
> >
>
>
> Hola

>
> Me llama la atención tu observacion
> "la z como th fue introducida después de la reforma, nunca antes existió
> >ese sonido en castellano"
>
> ¿Es posible que un fonema sea introducido en una lengua?
> El pueblo chileno conoce una frase:
> "la historia es nuestra y la hacen los pueblos".
>
> Según te entiendo la pronunciación z como th inglesa más bien parece
debida
> a un complot.
> Pero, ¿es posible hacer esto?
> ¿acaso las lenguas no tienen una evolución incontrolable por los grupos de
> poder, especialmente en la época de la famosa Reforma, en que nadie sabía
> mucho de fonética, ni de fonología?
> Piensa todo el tiempo que nos vienen machacando con la diferencia entre V
y
> B, sin embargo no hacemos esa distinción por más que lo quieran los
> profesores y los preocupados por el bien-hablar.
> "la lengua es nuestra y la hacen los pueblos"
>
> La descripción de z con sonido "ciceante" recién aparece en gramáticas del
> siglo XIX y se piensa que se estableció plenamente a mediados del siglo
> XVIII, después de una evolución que se cree iniciada en el siglo XVI.
>
> Chao
>
>
> Ignacio
>
>
>
>

Leonard Kelly

unread,
Dec 6, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/6/99
to
The correct pronounciation really depends upon the region. Same thing
happens in any language. According to the Spanish Royal Academy(La Real
Academia Española) the right way would be "V" as in Victoria and not
"B" as in Bob. In Spain you will hear it pronounced like that. But if
you visit certain Latin-American and Central-American countries, you'll
hear it either way,("B" or "V"), and yet though it is incorrect, it is
accepted as correct.

Have a G-R-R-R-E-A-T day!!!

LEON


ignacio

unread,
Dec 6, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/6/99
to

dov escribió en mensaje <82h8kp$d8o$1...@news2.inter.net.il>...

>Ignacio:
> Sí, las lenguas pertenecen a los pueblos, pero es norma que
los
>pueblos no siempre son libres, y aunque los ejemplos de prohibiciones
>y obligaciones no parezca real, es un hecho, que grupos mayoritarios
>hicieron desaparecer idiomas completos de grupos minoritarios, y
>viceversa, más de una vez, la intención es loable, por ejemplo, intentar
>la integración de distintos grupos en un pueblo unido, aunque, en general
>el grupo que pierde su idioma, pierde también su idiosincracia, y se
>convierte en un subgrupo marginal del nuevo pueblo integrado.
> chau
>dov


Hola

No niego nada de eso, es cuestión de tomar cualquier libro de historia y
verificar.
No dudo que a algunos pueblos se les prohibió, se les prohíbe y,
seguramente, se les seguirá prohibiendo hablar su lengua nativa.
Pero dudo que intencionalmente, como se ha dicho, se introduzca
artificialmente un fonema en una lengua con la intención de diferenciarla de
otras, eso atenta contra las leyes de la fonética y la evolución natural de
las lenguas.
Tendrían que demostrármelo citando fuentes fidedignas
La reconstitución de la evolución de la pronunciación a través del tiempo es
imposible, sólo se logra una aproximación a través de los escritos que gente
con y sin experiencia lingüística nos legó. Los estudiosos analizan
escritos, descripciones, poesías (buscando rimas para captar la semejanza en
el sonido de distintas letras), etc. Y en ningún lado, que yo sepa, se habla
de introducción de fonemas de manera forzada. Porque en las invasiones y
conquistas es toda un idioma el que se puede pretender imponer, pero no un
fonema.

Chao

Ignacio

ignacio

unread,
Dec 6, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/6/99
to

Angelico escribió en mensaje <384b402d...@news.bcn.ttd.net>...

>On Fri, 3 Dec 1999 03:25:08 -0200, "ignacio" <sole...@ctcinternet.cl>
>wrote:

-----------------------------------------
Hola

Pues, te repito que Amado Alonso dice que esa confusión entre V y B no
siempre existió y cita varios ejemplos de gramáticas y descripciones de V y
B que dan fe de lo que dice.
Tendrías que leer el libro (De la pronunciación medieval a la española).

Ignacio

Jerry Friedman

unread,
Dec 7, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/7/99
to
In article <82emau$crr$1...@news2.inter.net.il>,
"dov" <ru...@kibutzdan.co.il> wrote:
> Jerry: Te equivocas,

Es el resulto de leer mucha ciencia ficción.

> entre los 33 *olim* que viajaron junto conmigo a
> Israel, mis
> dos hijos y yo fuimos los únicos que no hicieron la *cola* (de 5 en
fondo)
> para conseguir los pasaportes, legales *ojo*, y un oficial de la
policía me
> lo trajo a la oficina para que no me molestara en ir a retirarlos,
todo
> gracias a un almirante
> que era uno de los directores de la empresa internacional en la que
> trabajaba.
> Yo sabía muy bien donde iba, (o creía saberlo), llegue en plena noche,
y a
> la
> mañana temprano, en Beer Sheva, en el desierto del Neguev, salí al
balcón
> del 2º piso para ver el panorama y lo que ví era sí, un desierto, pero
un
> desierto
> sembrado de filas, y mas filas de cruces blancas...

Filas... filas... ahora me acuerdo, es una palabra de jerga que quiere
decir "cuchillos"! :-)

¿Qué quiere decir "legales *ojo*? Y ¿porqué hubo tantas cruces en
Israel?

> > --
> > Jerry Friedman
> > jfrE...@nnm.cc.nm.us
> > i before e
> > and all the disclaimers

> > Les agradeceré a los que me corrijan las equivocaciones.
> >
> >

sophie

unread,
Dec 7, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/7/99
to
Leon:


thank you for your insight on pronunciation of v and b in
Spanish. I think my Spanish prof would be very pleased with
your reply since she believe that the ONLY correct
pronunciation of V is V and B is B. But as you say in some
places it is pronounced differently and this should be
recognized also...


* Sent from AltaVista http://www.altavista.com Where you can also find related Web Pages, Images, Audios, Videos, News, and Shopping. Smart is Beautiful

Angelico

unread,
Dec 8, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/8/99
to
On Mon, 6 Dec 1999 20:16:06 -0200, "ignacio" <sole...@ctcinternet.cl>
wrote:

=Hola
=
=Pues, te repito que Amado Alonso dice que esa confusión entre V y B no
=siempre existió y cita varios ejemplos de gramáticas y descripciones de V y
=B que dan fe de lo que dice.
=Tendrías que leer el libro (De la pronunciación medieval a la española).
=
=Ignacio
=
Me gustaría. ¿Puedes darme más referencias? (Editorial, ISBN si lo
tiene...)


--
Angel Arnal
Valencia, España
ICQ# 49213241

dov

unread,
Dec 8, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/8/99
to
Intercalo

Jerry Friedman <jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:82jfg5$hti$1...@nnrp1.deja.com...
Filas= Rows=Líneas

>
> ¿Qué quiere decir "legales *ojo*?

legales: algunos de los emigrantes tenían pasaportes con nombres falsos,
por el peligro de ser detenidos y¨"desaparecidos", por la junta militar.
ojo= presta atención= toma en cuenta


Y ¿porqué hubo tantas cruces en
> Israel?

En lo que eran las afueras de Beer Sheva, hay un cementerio militar
británico,
de la primera guerra mundial, y era lo único que se veía desde el balcón que
ponía para el lado del desierto.
chau
dov


Dkcsac

unread,
Dec 8, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/8/99
to
>Pues, te repito que Amado Alonso dice que esa confusión entre V y B no
siempre existió y cita varios ejemplos de gramáticas y descripciones de V y
B que dan fe de lo que dice.

He leído que algunas inscripciones romanas tienen confusión entre V y B.
También, muchas palabras que se escriben con V en el portugués, el francés, y
el italiano vienen de palabras latinas que se escriben con B. Y muchos niñitos
por todo el mundo usan [b] en vez de [v] si sus idiomas tienen los dos sonidos.
Quizás esto viene de la falta de dientes anteriores, lo cual hace más difícil
pronunciar bien la V labiodental.

ignacio

unread,
Dec 8, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/8/99
to

Angelico escribió en mensaje <3851878b...@news.bcn.ttd.net>...

>On Mon, 6 Dec 1999 20:16:06 -0200, "ignacio" <sole...@ctcinternet.cl>
>wrote:
>
>=Hola
>=
>=Pues, te repito que Amado Alonso dice que esa confusión entre V y B no
>=siempre existió y cita varios ejemplos de gramáticas y descripciones de V
y

>=B que dan fe de lo que dice.
>=Tendrías que leer el libro (De la pronunciación medieval a la española).
>=
>=Ignacio
>=
>Me gustaría. ¿Puedes darme más referencias? (Editorial, ISBN si lo
>tiene...)
>--
>Angel Arnal
>Valencia, España
>ICQ# 49213241

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------

Amado Alonso
"De la pronunciación medieval a la moderna en Español"
Biblioteca Románica Hispánica
Editorial Gredos
Madrid 1955

Parece que en esos años no existía el ISBN

Es de esos famosos libros de la Editorial Gredos, de tapa color crema-

Hay una paginilla (en inglés) que habla acerca del español en los tiempos de
Cervantes, algo menciona por ahí
http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~cervantes/csa/articf90/consonan.htm

Ignacio


Angelico

unread,
Dec 9, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/9/99
to
On Wed, 8 Dec 1999 13:50:29 -0200, "ignacio" <sole...@ctcinternet.cl>
wrote:

=
=Angelico escribió en mensaje <3851878b...@news.bcn.ttd.net>...
=>On Mon, 6 Dec 1999 20:16:06 -0200, "ignacio" <sole...@ctcinternet.cl>
=>wrote:
=>
=>=Hola
=>=


=>=Pues, te repito que Amado Alonso dice que esa confusión entre V y B no

=>=siempre existió y cita varios ejemplos de gramáticas y descripciones de V
=y
=>=B que dan fe de lo que dice.
=>=Tendrías que leer el libro (De la pronunciación medieval a la española).
=>=
=>=Ignacio
=>=


=>Me gustaría. ¿Puedes darme más referencias? (Editorial, ISBN si lo

=>tiene...)
=>--
=>Angel Arnal
=>Valencia, España
=>ICQ# 49213241
=
=----------------------------------------------------------------------------
=-------------
=
=Amado Alonso
="De la pronunciación medieval a la moderna en Español"
=Biblioteca Románica Hispánica
=Editorial Gredos
=Madrid 1955
=
=Parece que en esos años no existía el ISBN
=
=Es de esos famosos libros de la Editorial Gredos, de tapa color crema-
=
=Hay una paginilla (en inglés) que habla acerca del español en los tiempos de
=Cervantes, algo menciona por ahí
=http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~cervantes/csa/articf90/consonan.htm
=
=Ignacio
=
=
Gracias. Lo buscaré en una biblioteca o en las librerías de usado.


--
Angel Arnal
Valencia, España
ICQ# 49213241

Carlos Th

unread,
Dec 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/10/99
to
Leonard Kelly escribió:

Let me disagree with you Leonard. According to the Spanish Royal
Academy, and as stated in the DRAE (Spanish Royal Academy Dictionary),
{v} is pronounced just like {b}: a biliabial voiced stop at the
begining of a phrase or after a nasal, softened as a bilabial voiced
fricative in other positions.

So pronouncing {v} abd {b} both as /b/ IS NOT incorrect.

But there are many people who pronounce {v} as labiodental (as {v} in
English or French) and my experience is that for some people it is a
forced distinction. While it seams to be a natural distinction in some
dialects of Spanish.

After a discution with dov (note the lowercase), it seams Argentina to
be one of those places distinction is made, as in New Mexico or
Californian Spanish (Chicano or Inmigrant?).

Well, there is a source on Rioplatence Spanish at
http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Shire/1021/arsp.html where such a
distinction is not mensioned. It even says:
<< Both b and v are read as /b/. There's no difference between the
sounds. Note that nv is actually read /mb/! >>

This evening I was looking at an Argentinan soap opera and try to
listening carfully at the dialogs and the conclusion:
Most people pronounce {v} as /b/.
Some people pronounce some {v}s as /v/ and some others as /b/ (there
was even a guy who say "vivir" as /bivir/ or something like that)
And old lady usually pronounced {v} as /v/, and sounded natural.

My conclusion, which also applies to other dialects and accents:
1) There are people for whom {v} and {b} has a natural phonemic
distiction. Our fellow lister dov seams to be one of them.
2) There are people whose distinction is artificial. It
sounds "cursi" and affected. Those people probably exagerate the sound
of /v/, usually lengthening it and devoicing it a little.
3) There are people whose fricative /b/ (either {b} or {v}) could be
labiodental in certain situations. (was it Ignacio who said that in
Chile 'bebida' usually sounds like /bevida/?)
4) Most people just pronounce both {b} and {v} as /b/, with two
alophonic variants: an oclusive [b] and a fricative [B], distinction
made by position, not by orthography.

There are a lot of people that wrongly believe that {v} should be
labiodental. Those people are good candidates for case 2). (Well, in
order to be fair, many of these people are in case 1) and even in case
4).)

I also have a theory of what had historically happened: people who
lived in Iberia before Roman rule had no /v/ sound. (Probably neither
an /f/ sound.) When Romans came and imposed their language, many
Iberians pronounced both {B} and consonantic {V} as the same sound.
This probably became a cult/vulgar distinction or something like that.
For centuries (...milenia?) different authors have made diffetent
lectures about what is correct and what is accepted. The controversy
is on even today when the official position (RAE) says that the sound
is the same, while many teachers for both native and second language
students tell otherways... and there are people who make no distinction
(like me), who make a natural distinction (like dov?), and who make an
artificial distinction (like some teachers / locutors / politicians /
scientists...)

--
================================O=O=====
Chlewey Thompin
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/9028
----------------------------------------

Greybeard

unread,
Dec 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/10/99
to
On Fri, 10 Dec 1999 04:02:18 GMT, Carlos Th <chl...@my-deja.com>
wrote:

Very clearly put, Chlewey -- thanks for taking the time to put this
together.

Saludos,
Greybeard

Dreamglint

unread,
Dec 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/11/99
to
There is a distinct difference between the Spanish B and the V. But
gringitos won't notice the difference until they've been around the language
long enough, and can make the distinction from simply hearing it spoken so
often. By the time that happens, you'll be pronouncing it correctly sin
pensar dos veces.

You're not going to learn it's distinction from a book. Also, depending on
the word, the differences between the b and v may change. There's no rule
that the native pronunciation sticks to. You just simply have to hear it
used so often that you speak it correctly because it sounds correct to your
ears and emerges correctly from your lips.

That's just my tid-bit of advice from experience. Not to discredit the
afore-posted response to your question, and no offense intended toward
Carlos. This is just my personal viewpoint on the matter.

Nos hablamos.
Dreamglint

Jerry Friedman

unread,
Dec 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/13/99
to
In article <82pu08$55v$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
Carlos Th <chl...@my-deja.com> wrote:
...

> But there are many people who pronounce {v} as labiodental (as {v} in
> English or French) and my experience is that for some people it is a
> forced distinction. While it seams to be a natural distinction in
some
> dialects of Spanish.
>
> After a discution with dov (note the lowercase), it seams Argentina to
> be one of those places distinction is made, as in New Mexico or
> Californian Spanish (Chicano or Inmigrant?).

I think the answer to your question for New Mexico is: There are two
main Spanish-speaking populations here, immigrant (mostly from Mexico
within the past few decades), and "native" (before the Mexican-American
War of 1846). My comments about a distinction between v (labiodental)
and b apply to the descendants of the pre-1846 population. I don't know
much about the speech of recent Mexican immigrants, partly because I
don't know many, and partly because they talk too fast!
...

> 4) Most people just pronounce both {b} and {v} as /b/, with two
> alophonic variants: an oclusive [b] and a fricative [B], distinction
> made by position, not by orthography.

Hijo la, phonemes and allophones! But it really is the only right way
to talk about this stuff. Too bad I don't understand it better.

¿Ahora puedes explicarnos la distinción entre "Chlewey" y "Carlos"?

--
Jerry Friedman
jfrE...@nnm.cc.nm.us
i before e
and all the disclaimers

Greybeard

unread,
Dec 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/14/99
to
On Mon, 13 Dec 1999 22:12:33 GMT, Jerry Friedman
<jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote:

>In article <82pu08$55v$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
> Carlos Th <chl...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>...
>> But there are many people who pronounce {v} as labiodental (as {v} in
>> English or French) and my experience is that for some people it is a
>> forced distinction. While it seams to be a natural distinction in
>some
>> dialects of Spanish.
>>
>> After a discution with dov (note the lowercase), it seams Argentina to
>> be one of those places distinction is made, as in New Mexico or
>> Californian Spanish (Chicano or Inmigrant?).
>
>I think the answer to your question for New Mexico is: There are two
>main Spanish-speaking populations here, immigrant (mostly from Mexico
>within the past few decades), and "native" (before the Mexican-American
>War of 1846). My comments about a distinction between v (labiodental)
>and b apply to the descendants of the pre-1846 population. I don't know
>much about the speech of recent Mexican immigrants, partly because I
>don't know many, and partly because they talk too fast!

I've been told -- you would know better than I -- that the pre-1846
group like to distinguish themselves from the later arrivals,
considering themselves "Spanish" rather than "Mexican". If so, might
they also assume the different pronunciation as a way of further
distinguishing themselves?

>...
>
>> 4) Most people just pronounce both {b} and {v} as /b/, with two
>> alophonic variants: an oclusive [b] and a fricative [B], distinction
>> made by position, not by orthography.
>
>Hijo la, phonemes and allophones! But it really is the only right way
>to talk about this stuff. Too bad I don't understand it better.
>
>¿Ahora puedes explicarnos la distinción entre "Chlewey" y "Carlos"?

Yo también estoy confuso sobre este punto.

Saludos,
Greybeard

Jerry Friedman

unread,
Dec 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/14/99
to
In article <j7rc5s8a8r9f7apo8...@4ax.com>,

Greybeard <jmes...@newsguy.com> wrote:
> On Mon, 13 Dec 1999 22:12:33 GMT, Jerry Friedman
> <jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote:
...

> >I think the answer to your question for New Mexico is: There are two
> >main Spanish-speaking populations here, immigrant (mostly from Mexico
> >within the past few decades), and "native" (before the
Mexican-American
> >War of 1846). My comments about a distinction between v
(labiodental)
> >and b apply to the descendants of the pre-1846 population. I don't
know
> >much about the speech of recent Mexican immigrants, partly because I
> >don't know many, and partly because they talk too fast!
>
> I've been told -- you would know better than I -- that the pre-1846
> group like to distinguish themselves from the later arrivals,
> considering themselves "Spanish" rather than "Mexican". If so, might
> they also assume the different pronunciation as a way of further
> distinguishing themselves?
...

Hmm, could be.

You're right, some people in the pre-1846 group, maybe the majority, do
indeed like to be called "Spanish", and more or less the same people
don't like to be called "Mexican". Some day in some newsgroup I may
elaborate on my total confusion about how to refer to ethnic groups here
in any language. (But there are some things I'm sure of, such as that I
need to have a talk with a certain young acquaintance about his use of
"moj---".)

Dkcsac

unread,
Dec 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/14/99
to
>>¿Ahora puedes explicarnos la distinción entre "Chlewey" y "Carlos"?
>
>Yo también estoy confuso sobre este punto.

If by "Chlewey" you mean "Chuy", it's a nickname for "Jesús". In nicknames, the
letter S often becomes CH.

Greybeard

unread,
Dec 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/14/99
to

No, it's that his e-mail name shows as "Carlos Th", and he often (bot
not always) signs himself "Carlos", but his sig line has "Chlewey
Thompin".

Maybe if we talk about him loud enough, he'll clear up the confusion
:-)

Regards,
Greybeard

Carlos Th

unread,
Dec 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/15/99
to
In article <ho8d5sgd5hlahg5vq...@4ax.com>,

Well. Here listening.

My name is Carlos, or as my _cédula_ and passport tell: Carlos Eugenio
Thompson Pinzón. It is just my name; my real name; the name my parents
gave me.

For short you can say Carlos Thompson (drop second/middle name Eugenio
and second/mother lastname Pinzón). Or even shorter just my first
given name: Carlos.

I usually sign emails and news postings as "Carlos Th", focusing on the
given name but making it clear enough is not any carlos.

But, while my name is Carlos, I am Chlewey. Chlewey is a pseudonym,
unique and short enough. There are lots of Carlos in the world. There
are plenty of Carlos Thompson just in the USA (I've check online
telephone books), and Carlos Eugenio Thompson Pinzón are there luckly
just one... but the whole name is too long for a short sig.
So "Chlewey" is short and unique enough.

-- Carlos Eugenio Thompson Pinzón
aka Carlos Th
aka Chlewey


================================O=O=====
Chlewey Thompin
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/9028
----------------------------------------

Greybeard

unread,
Dec 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/15/99
to
On Wed, 15 Dec 1999 00:14:57 GMT, Carlos Th <chl...@my-deja.com>
wrote:

>In article <ho8d5sgd5hlahg5vq...@4ax.com>,

Gracias, Carlos.

Saludos,
Greybeard

Karl Reinhardt

unread,
Dec 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/15/99
to
On Mon, 13 Dec 1999 22:12:33 GMT, Jerry Friedman
<jfried...@my-deja.com> wrote:

>In article <82pu08$55v$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
> Carlos Th <chl...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>...
>

>> 4) Most people just pronounce both {b} and {v} as /b/, with two
>> alophonic variants: an oclusive [b] and a fricative [B], distinction
>> made by position, not by orthography.
>

To reinforce this: the sound [v] does indeed appear in New Mexico, and
very frequently. However it has nothing to do with the spelling
letter 'v', and is just as likely to be pronounced with a word
traditionally spelled with a 'b'. In the introduction to a fairy
tale, "había una vez" has two [v]s.
Thus: [b], [(fricative b)], and [v] are all variants of one phoneme,
which is traditionally indicated by /b/, although phonemes are not
*phonetic* material. It could be just as easily indicated by /v/ or
/&/, but the tradition is to spell phonemes with the handiest letter
that seems to make sense.
Karl

Jerry Friedman

unread,
Dec 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/16/99
to
In article <3857a6d8...@news.hal-pc.org>,

Hm. I think there are native speakers here who pronounce the letters
"b" and "v" differently in some situations, but I'm not sure. I may get
back to you after I listen some more and ask some more questions.

In the mean time, if you're getting this information from
references, could you share one or two? Books would be a lot easier for
me than journal articles. Or is this from your experience?

--
Jerry Friedman
jfrE...@nnm.cc.nm.us
i before e
and all the disclaimers

LePages

unread,
Dec 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/21/99
to
Well, its rather hard to actually describe how they say their v's, but my
experience with mexican speakers is that they sort of mix the "v" and "b"
together. So to non-natives it sounds like a b. You obviously know they don't
say "v" like we would.


> All I know is that when I watch Mexican novelas, they always say "mi vida"
> as "mi bida."

lepage.vcf
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages