=SDC= Q20: Question Without Names

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Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 19, 2011, 6:41:24 AM8/19/11
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A's mistress is B. B's mistress is C. B expects C to become A's
mistress and commits suicide. If C is an eponym and a toponym closely
associated with a Floridian known to us all, what lexical category is B?
Please explain.

--
VB

Jerry Friedman

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Aug 20, 2011, 10:42:09 AM8/20/11
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This involves a pseudonym that's not "Blood".

--
Jerry Friedman, T. O. Panelist

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 22, 2011, 7:50:51 AM8/22/11
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A male alias used by a female writer.

--
VB
T. O. Panellist

James Hogg

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Aug 22, 2011, 8:19:10 AM8/22/11
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I've been puzzling over this one for ages, wondering how Orlando fits in
(neither Furioso nor Woolf got me anywhere). This latest clue makes me
think of George Sand (not Sang), if that is of any help to anyone.

--
James

CDB

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Aug 22, 2011, 12:58:37 PM8/22/11
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James Hogg wrote:
> Vinny Burgoo wrote:

>> Jerry Friedman wrote:
>>> Vinny Burgoo <hlu...@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>>> A's mistress is B. B's mistress is C. B expects C to become A's
>>>> mistress and commits suicide. If C is an eponym and a toponym
>>>> closely associated with a Floridian known to us all, what
>>>> lexical category is B? Please explain.
>>>
>>> This involves a pseudonym that's not "Blood".
>>
>> A male alias used by a female writer.
>
> I've been puzzling over this one for ages, wondering how Orlando
> fits in (neither Furioso nor Woolf got me anywhere). This latest
> clue makes me think of George Sand (not Sang), if that is of any
> help to anyone.
>>
"Eponym and toponym", with a link to Orlando, made me think of Eve
Arden (_As You Like It_), but gosh knows if that sad story happened in
any of her movies. She was more of a best friend, usually.


Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 22, 2011, 1:40:14 PM8/22/11
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Who's here?

Alan Curry

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Aug 22, 2011, 4:43:13 PM8/22/11
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In article <gcbfuyr+...@shropshire.plus.com>,

That's one of the hypothetical etymologies of "Hoosier"; a competing theory
is that it's an eponym. The word alone isn't a toponym though.

--
Alan Curry

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 23, 2011, 4:14:38 PM8/23/11
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But Hoosiers do live in toponyms.

(Or so I've heard. Me, I prefer a house.)

CDB

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Aug 24, 2011, 12:31:07 AM8/24/11
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B is a Noun.


Jerry Friedman

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Aug 24, 2011, 12:37:29 AM8/24/11
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On Aug 23, 10:31 pm, "CDB" <bellema...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
> Vinny Burgoo wrote:
> > In alt.usage.english, Alan Curry wrote:
> >> In article <gcbfuyr+RpUOF...@shropshire.plus.com>,

Thank you!

Snidely

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Aug 24, 2011, 4:18:43 AM8/24/11
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Jerry Friedman <je...@totally-official.com> scribbled something like ...

Ummm, didn't we know that even before Topo came to play? The grains of
Miami and Daytona didn't change that, did they? Or was the punch Spiked?

/dps

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 24, 2011, 10:09:22 AM8/24/11
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I can't remember.

Explanation: A, B, C and D are characters from George Sand's novel
_Indiana_. A is Raymond de Ramiere, B is the maid Noun, and C is her
mistress, Indiana (Tony Cooper's home state).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_%28novel%29

While passing by a movie theater, McNally saw the title of the
film Blood and Sand on the marquee. He turned to his friend and
said, 'That's it. You be Sand. I'll be Blood.'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Blood

CDB

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Aug 24, 2011, 10:12:21 AM8/24/11
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A proper noun, then. Yes, we sort of knew it all, especially after
James mentioned George Sand. Can't think why he didn't take the last
step-- busy, I guess.
>>
Wp on _Indiana_, by GS:
>>
In the story an attractive, young Creole from Réunion named Indiana is
married to an older ex-army officer named Colonel Delmare. Indiana
does not love him, and searches for someone who will love her
passionately. She overlooks her cousin Ralph, who lives with her and
the colonel and who has loved her steadfastly from a young age. When
their young, handsome, and well-spoken neighbor, Raymon de Ramiere
declares his interest to Indiana, she falls in love with him. Raymon
has already seduced Indiana's maid, Noun, who is pregnant with his
child. When Noun finds out what is going on, she drowns herself.
>>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_(novel)


James Hogg

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Aug 24, 2011, 10:14:42 AM8/24/11
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CDB wrote:
> A proper noun, then. Yes, we sort of knew it all, especially after
> James mentioned George Sand. Can't think why he didn't take the last
> step-- busy, I guess.

Yes, I wonder about the word "doldrums" in the title of this contest.
Summer is almost over too...

--
James

Snidely

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Aug 24, 2011, 1:21:32 PM8/24/11
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Vinny Burgoo <hlu...@yahoo.co.uk> scribbled something like ...

> In alt.usage.english, Snidely wrote:
[...]


>>>> >>>>>>> Vinny Burgoo <hlu...@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> >>>>>>>> A's mistress is B.  B's mistress is C.  B expects C to
>>>> >>>>>>>> become A's mistress and commits suicide.  If C is an eponym
>>>> >>>>>>>> and a toponym closely associated with a Floridian known to
>>>> >>>>>>>> us all, what lexical category is B? Please explain.

[...]


>>>> B is a Noun.
>>>
>>> Thank you!
>>
>>Ummm, didn't we know that even before Topo came to play? The grains of
>>Miami and Daytona didn't change that, did they? Or was the punch
Spiked?

"Spike" for "Mulligan", which is a misformed Hitchcock reference. Sorry.

>
> I can't remember.
>
> Explanation: A, B, C and D are characters from George Sand's novel
> _Indiana_. A is Raymond de Ramiere, B is the maid Noun, and C is her
> mistress, Indiana (Tony Cooper's home state).

Ah, cute. The noun yclept Noun.

One of these days I may return to the world of printed and bound pages,
to see what all the fuss is about.

/dps

Jerry Friedman

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Aug 29, 2011, 12:02:02 AM8/29/11
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On Aug 23, 10:37 pm, Jerry Friedman <je...@totally-official.com>
wrote:

> On Aug 23, 10:31 pm, "CDB" <bellema...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
>
>
>
> > Vinny Burgoo wrote:
> > > In alt.usage.english, Alan Curry wrote:
> > >> In article <gcbfuyr+RpUOF...@shropshire.plus.com>,
> > >> Vinny Burgoo  <hlu...@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
> > >>> In alt.usage.english, CDB wrote:
> > >>>> James Hogg wrote:
> > >>>>> Vinny Burgoo wrote:
> > >>>>>> Jerry Friedman wrote:
> > >>>>>>> Vinny Burgoo <hlu...@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
>
> > >>>>>>>> A'smistressis B.  B'smistressis C.  B expects C to
> > >>>>>>>> become A'smistressand commitssuicide.  If C is an eponym
> > >>>>>>>> and a toponym closely associated with aFloridianknown to

> > >>>>>>>> us all, what lexical category is B? Please explain.
>
> > >>>>>>> This involves a pseudonym that's not "Blood".
>
> > >>>>>> A male alias used by a female writer.
>
> > >>>>> I've been puzzling over this one for ages, wondering how Orlando
> > >>>>> fits in (neither Furioso nor Woolf got me anywhere). This latest
> > >>>>> clue makes me think of George Sand (not Sang), if that is of any
> > >>>>> help to anyone.
>
> > >>>> "Eponym and toponym", with a link to Orlando, made me think of
> > >>>> Eve Arden (_As You Like It_), but gosh knows if that sad story
> > >>>> happened in any of her movies.  She was more of a best friend,
> > >>>> usually.
>
> > >>> Who's here?
>
> > >> That's one of the hypothetical etymologies of "Hoosier"; a
> > >> competing theory is that it's an eponym. The word alone isn't a
> > >> toponym though.
>
> > > But Hoosiers do live in toponyms.
>
> > > (Or so I've heard. Me, I prefer a house.)
>
> > B is a Noun.
>
> Thank you!

Your Cormo, which though a noun is quite satisfied with life, is
arriving from the Hoosier state.

By the way, how would "Noun" be pronounced in French? Like English
"noon"? With nasalization instead of a final /n/? Something like
"Nohant"?

--
Jerry Friedman, T. O. Sheepmaster

Isabelle Cecchini

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Aug 29, 2011, 4:21:07 AM8/29/11
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Le 29/08/2011 06:02, Jerry Friedman a �crit :
[...]

>
> By the way, how would "Noun" be pronounced in French? Like English
> "noon"?

Something like "noon", yes. It would rhyme with "simoun".

> With nasalization instead of a final /n/? Something like
> "Nohant"?
>
> --
> Jerry Friedman, T. O. Sheepmaster


--
Isabelle Cecchini T. O. sheepless

CDB

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Aug 29, 2011, 4:29:57 PM8/29/11
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Jerry Friedman wrote:

> Jerry Friedman <je...@totally-official.com> wrote:
>> "CDB" <bellema...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
>>> Vinny Burgoo wrote:
I would have pronounced it as Isabelle has recommended, but I would
have been guessing. I did wonder if it was the accusative of
Greek/BrE "nous", good sense, but the poor girl doesn't seem to have
had much of that.


Jerry Friedman

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Aug 29, 2011, 4:34:14 PM8/29/11
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On Aug 29, 2:21 am, Isabelle Cecchini

<isabelle.cecch...@wanadooo.invalid.fr> wrote:
> Le 29/08/2011 06:02, Jerry Friedman a crit :
> [...]
>
> > By the way, how would "Noun" be pronounced in French?  Like English
> > "noon"?
>
> Something like "noon", yes. It would rhyme with "simoun".
...

Thanks. Now I know how to pronounce "simoun" (which I see means
"simoon"), too.

--
Jerry Friedman

Mike Lyle

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Aug 29, 2011, 6:22:10 PM8/29/11
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It even means "simoom" and "samoom" (which, for my money, is nearer to
the Arabic).

--
Mike.

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