"Fart..."

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Tim Fulmer

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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Jimmy Lio wrote:
>
> Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
> the word?
>
> Jimmy


There are hundreds of substitutes:
e.g.:

toot your horn

pass gas

cut the cheese


I wouldn't consider it obscene. I classify it with words like "crap"
and "piss." Sort of intermediate on the obscene word hierarchy--a
little stronger than, say, "darn" but much weaker than, say,
"cocksucking motherfucker."

Hope that helps.

T. Fulmer

Jimmy Lio

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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Dr. Richard Kimble

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com> wrote:
: Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
: the word?

Not obscene, perhaps impolite. Some variations are: "break wind,"
"pass wind," "pass gas," "let off."

Larry Sherman

Padraig Breathnach

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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Jimmy Lio asked:

> Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
> the word?
>

I think that it is not normally considered to be obscene -- but perhaps not
quite appropriate for the most polite society (or so I gather, not being a
member).

For those of somewhat delicate sensibilities, the euphemism "break wind" is
quite acceptable.

For those of very delicate sensibilities, such things just do not happen!

PB

Justme®

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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On Wed, 19 Nov 1997 09:34:02 -0700, Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com>
shared:

>Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
>the word?
>

>Jimmy


-pass wind
-pass gas
-break wind
-toot
-experiment with methane
-"quick! grab the jar and the matches!"
-boof (children's gas)
-"you--pull my finger"
-"WOOOOO! That wuz a BIG`UN!" (said while waving your hand behind
your bottom)
-If you're on America Online: "Welcome! You've got....GAS!"
-(alternate for AOL "cannot break wind currently. please try again in

10 minutes.")
-If you're Captain James T. Kirk, Starship Enterprise: "Dammit
Bones, I've got GAS! I -- must--break--WIND!"


--Ginny
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"The original point and click interface."

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Stan Brown

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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In article <347314FA...@geocities.com>, gl...@geocities.com (Jimmy
Lio) wrote:
>Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
>the word?

Vulgar but not obscene, I believe. "Break wind" is the customary
euphemism.

But etiquette has a better solution: it is at least as rude to notice or
comment as it is to commit the act -- more so, actually, since the act
was presumably not a matter of choice and making comment assuredly is.

--

Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
http://www.concentric.net/%7eBrownsta/


Paul Juhl

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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Stan Brown wrote:

> Vulgar but not obscene, I believe. "Break wind" is the customary
> euphemism.

Or as my daughter said when she was about 3: "Oops! My bum burped."
--
Cheers, Paul Juhl, Montreal
ju...@jbsyndicate.com

J. F. Emery

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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In article <347314FA...@geocities.com>, Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com>
wrote:

>Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
>the word?

"Fart" is a word with an ancient and noble pedigree, going back to
Proto-Indo-European at least! There are cognates throughout the
superfamily. In fact, IIRC, there were two IE roots meaning "to fart", one
meaning "to fart loudly" and the other "to fart softly". In light of its
long and glorious history, I, for one, believe "fart" should be used with
pride, no substitute required!

Truly Donovan

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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Stan Brown wrote:
>
> In article <347314FA...@geocities.com>, gl...@geocities.com (Jimmy
> Lio) wrote:
> >Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
> >the word?
>
> Vulgar but not obscene, I believe. "Break wind" is the customary
> euphemism.

And of course there is "experiencing some flatulence."


>
> But etiquette has a better solution: it is at least as rude to notice or
> comment as it is to commit the act -- more so, actually, since the act
> was presumably not a matter of choice and making comment assuredly is.

The critical etiquette rule that applies here is "Never
apologize louder than you farted."

--
Truly Donovan
reply to truly at lunemere dot com

Larry Phillips

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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J. F. Emery wrote:
> In fact, IIRC, there were two IE roots meaning "to fart", one
> meaning "to fart loudly" and the other "to fart softly". In light of
> its long and glorious history, I, for one, believe "fart" should be
> used with pride, no substitute required!

I wholeheartedly agree, and further, I believe that farts should be
accorded the recognition they deserve. As george Carlin used to say,
"Kids know that farts are funny."

Joseph C Fineman

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Nov 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/19/97
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Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com> writes:

>Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute
>for the word?

Back in the days when some of the four-letter words were legally
obscene, I believe that it was not an offense (at least in the U.S.)
to print "fart". I suspect you will find it in unabridged
dictionaries of (say) the 1930s.

However, it was surely considered indelicate & avoided in respectable
company. "Break(ing) wind" (literary) & "eruct(ation)" (technical)
are possible substitutes.

--- Joe Fineman j...@world.std.com

||: The dirt in the cracks is where life goes on. :||

Simon R. Hughes

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com> scribbled:

> Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
> the word?

I remember seeing the definition of FART in a dictionary (I forget which),
when I was about 13, and finding it most amusing.

fart: n. A small explosion between one's legs.

...
Simon R. Hughes

"Be a philosopher; but, amidst all your philosophy, be still a man." -- David Hume

Bob Cunningham

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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On Wed, 19 Nov 1997 21:50:47 GMT, j...@world.std.com (Joseph C Fineman)
said:

[ . . . ]

>Back in the days when some of the four-letter words were legally
>obscene, I believe that it was not an offense (at least in the U.S.)
>to print "fart". I suspect you will find it in unabridged
>dictionaries of (say) the 1930s.

One unabridged dictionary of the 1930s, _Webster's New International
Dictionary Second Edition_ (1934), does not have it.

It's in the old OED, but so is 'shit'.


Daniel P. B. Smith

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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In article <347314FA...@geocities.com>,
Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com> wrote:
>Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
>the word?

In the United States, in the 1990's, in my milieu:

AHD3 classifies it as "vulgar slang," in contrast to s--- and f---, which
are "obscene." (Personally, I always thought s--- was a vulgarity, not an
obscenity... but in any case, the word "s---" is taboo and the word "fart"
is not).

There are no really polite substitutes because if you are being formal and
polite you don't talk about farting at all. The "official" polite phrase
is "to break wind." However, it sounds unnaturally formal. If you are in a
situation where it is OK to talk about farting at all, it is probably OK
to use the word "fart."

You could use the word "fart" among family and friends. In a formal
situation it would not be acceptable.

In polite company you _could_ say "I had terrible gas pains last night,"
but you would not actually talk about farting OR _passing_ gas OR breaking
wind.

If you needed to fart, you would say "excuse me," leave, and go to the
bathroom without describing exactly what you planned to do. If you
accidentally farted, again you would say "excuse me" but you would not
actually say what you had done or explain what you were apologizing for.

If you were in a social situation with a mother who was not a close
friend, and she was holding a baby, and the _baby_ farted, nobody would
use the word "fart." _You_ would say nothing. The _mother_ would
probably something like "Oh, my _goodness_," or might look at the baby and
say "Do we have gas?"

The medical term is "flatus" but nobody uses it in ordinary conversation.
(There is a joke in medical circles that "fart" is an acronym for "Flatus
Advanced by Rectal Transport." It is just a joke, though--it's not true.)

In talking to a doctor it is OK to use the word "fart."

Someone who farts a lot is "flatulent." But that is not a common word,
either.

--
Daniel P. B. Smith
dpbs...@world.std.com

Mark Odegard

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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**Note Spam Trap below** On Wed, 19 Nov 1997 18:53:29 -0800,
njk...@mindspringerspaniel.com (Mimi Kahn) in
<3474a608...@news.mindspring.com> wrote

|My Concise Oxford has "fart" and refers to the word as "coarse."

The word has become somewhat less coarse (or less vulgar), ever
since Ted Koppel publically referred to himself as an old fart
on his TV show.

For words such as these, dealing with bodily functions and
substances, we need another word to describe the class.
"Indelicate" comes near.
--
Mark Odegard.
My real address doesn't include a Christian name.
Emailed copies of responses are very much appreciated.

Reinhold Aman

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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Daniel P. B. Smith wrote:

(snip)

> The medical term is "flatus" but nobody uses it in ordinary conversation.

As in various other cultures, the Romans had words for the two basic
types of farts:
_flatus_ for the silent one, and
_crepitus_ for the loud, crackling one.

--
Reinhold Aman, Editor
MALEDICTA: The International Journal of Verbal Aggression
P.O. Box 14123
Santa Rosa, CA 95402-6123, USA
------------------------------------
http://www.sonic.net/maledicta/
Mirror site in Dublin, Ireland, at:
http://www.ucd.ie/~artspgs/mal/

Mike Barnes

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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In alt.usage.english, Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com> spake thuswise:

>Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
>the word?

An "SBD", which is actually the name of a particular *type* of fart.

Silent But Deadly.

--
-- Mike Barnes, Stockport, England.
-- If you post a response to Usenet, please *don't* send me a copy by e-mail.

Gary Lum

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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Mike Barnes wrote:

> In alt.usage.english, Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com> spake thuswise:
> >Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
> >the word?

> An "SBD", which is actually the name of a particular *type* of fart.
> Silent But Deadly.

What's wrong with just saying, "...passing flatus."

Alternatives include "...passing gas." or "...passing wind."

I much prefer flatus. I suppose for the pedantic you could say,
"...passing the endstage gaseous metabolic products resulting food
digestion."

Regards

Gary

PS The best thing about a good fart is lighting up a blue flame!!!

--
********************************************************
Dr Gary Lum
Director of Microbiology and Pathology
Royal Darwin Hospital

Microbiologists do it with culture and sensitivity
Meet me at http://www.ozemail.com.au/~glum/
Come and visit http://www.ozemail.com.au/~agar
E-mail me at mailto:gl...@ozemail.com.au
********************************************************

Gary Lum

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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Reinhold Aman wrote:

> > The medical term is "flatus" but nobody uses it in ordinary conversation.

Who says? I use the word flatus all the time. In fact I'm teaching my
children to say flatus, passing/voiding urine and defaecate rather than
the childish alternatives.

Mind you what do you expect from someone who spends all day running a
laboratory that analyses faeces, urine, pus and other bodily secretions?

Regards

Gary

Daniel P. B. Smith

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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In article <347433...@ozemail.com.au>,

Gary Lum <gl...@ozemail.com.au> wrote:
>Reinhold Aman wrote:
>
>> > The medical term is "flatus" but nobody uses it in ordinary conversation.
>
>Who says? I use the word flatus all the time. In fact I'm teaching my
>children to say flatus, passing/voiding urine and defaecate rather than
>the childish alternatives.
>
>Mind you what do you expect from someone who spends all day running a
>laboratory that analyses faeces, urine, pus and other bodily secretions?

You're setting your kids up for some awkward experiences, I think.
Nevertheless, they'll adapt. I thoroughly expect that someday you
will overhear them insulting their playmates by calling them
"faeces-heads."

Echo S

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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Reinhold Aman wrote:
>
> Daniel P. B. Smith wrote:
>
> (snip)
>
> > The medical term is "flatus" but nobody uses it in ordinary conversation.
>
> As in various other cultures, the Romans had words for the two basic
> types of farts:
> _flatus_ for the silent one, and
> _crepitus_ for the loud, crackling one.

Ahhh, and I'm sure you've all heard of the Roman god Flatulus whose
pranks were silent but deadly....

Mark Schaefer

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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In article <3474a608...@news.mindspring.com>,
njk...@mindspringerspaniel.com wrote:

> On Wed, 19 Nov 1997 21:50:47 GMT, j...@world.std.com (Joseph C Fineman)

> wrote:


>
> >Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com> writes:
> >
> >>Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute
> >>for the word?
> >

> >Back in the days when some of the four-letter words were legally
> >obscene, I believe that it was not an offense (at least in the U.S.)
> >to print "fart". I suspect you will find it in unabridged
> >dictionaries of (say) the 1930s.
>

> My Concise Oxford has "fart" and refers to the word as "coarse."

Which is too bad really, because the word is *ancient* and some cognate of
it was probably used by the Indo-Europeans. (According to my MW Coll.
10th: < ME 'ferten, farten'; akin to OHG 'ferzan' to break wind, ON
'freta', Gk 'perdesthai', Skt 'pardate' he breaks wind)

-- Mark A. Schaefer

"Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind." -- A. Einstein.

Bun Mui

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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"Fart" is the opposite of belching.

Bun Mui

Lee Jones

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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In article <MPG.edd44d2d...@news.concentric.net>,

Stan Brown <brow...@concentric.net> wrote:
>In article <347314FA...@geocities.com>, gl...@geocities.com (Jimmy
>Lio) wrote:
>>Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
>>the word?

>Vulgar but not obscene, I believe. "Break wind" is the customary
>euphemism.

I've often wondered how many people got the joke in the title of Spinal
Tap's "album" "Break Like The Wind".

Regards, Lee
"Our amplifiers go to 11."
--
Lee Jones | "Oh I can close my eyes and remember
le...@sgi.com | Her singing 'Precious Memories' sweet and low."
650-933-3356 | -Dry Branch Fire Squad ("Dust on the Bible")

Mark Schaefer

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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In article <347b66a0...@nntp.ix.netcom.com>, s.m...@ix.netcom.com wrote:

> On 20 Nov 1997 15:25:59 GMT, Mark_S...@notpartofmyaddress.csgi.com


> (Mark Schaefer) wrote:
>
> >In article <3474a608...@news.mindspring.com>,
> >njk...@mindspringerspaniel.com wrote:
> >
> >> On Wed, 19 Nov 1997 21:50:47 GMT, j...@world.std.com (Joseph C Fineman)
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> >Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com> writes:
> >> >

> >> >>Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute
> >> >>for the word?
> >> >

> >> >Back in the days when some of the four-letter words were legally
> >> >obscene, I believe that it was not an offense (at least in the U.S.)
> >> >to print "fart". I suspect you will find it in unabridged
> >> >dictionaries of (say) the 1930s.
> >>
> >> My Concise Oxford has "fart" and refers to the word as "coarse."
> >
> >Which is too bad really, because the word is *ancient* and some cognate of
> >it was probably used by the Indo-Europeans. (According to my MW Coll.
> >10th: < ME 'ferten, farten'; akin to OHG 'ferzan' to break wind, ON
> >'freta', Gk 'perdesthai', Skt 'pardate' he breaks wind)
>

> Wasn't the first line of Aristophanes' "The Birds" something like:
> "There he lies, farting in his sheets." ?
>
> Don't have a copy handy. Correction appreciated.
>
Not sure about that. But I remember in middle school we sang a song in
music class that was Old English and went something like

Sumer is a-cumen in (Summer is a-comin' in)
Lude sing cucku (Loudly sing cuckoo)
Bloweth sed and groweth med (Seed blows and mead (food) grows)
and springeth wude new (And springs the woods anew)
...
We never made it to the second verse which I learned in a college history
of English class contained the following line:

Bucke sterteth lombe ferteth... (The buck starts, the lamb farts...)

In all honesty, a music class of seventh graders would have descended into
irrecoverable anarchy had we actually included that particular verse.

Truly Donovan

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Nov 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/20/97
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Craig Welch wrote:

>
> Gary Lum <gl...@ozemail.com.au> wrote:
>
> >Who says? I use the word flatus all the time. In fact I'm teaching my
> >children to say flatus, passing/voiding urine and defaecate rather than
> >the childish alternatives.
>
> Does it not concern you that this will put them at odds with all of
> their friends/peers?

Gee, I thought that was one of its chief virtues. Maybe
they can even raise the lowest common denominator among
themselves.

Stevicus63

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Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

>Subject: Re: "Fart..."
>From: Tim Fulmer <ful...@bioc.rice.edu>
>Date: Wed, Nov 19, 1997 12:33 EST

>Jimmy Lio wrote:
>>
>> Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
>> the word?
>>

>> Jimmy
>
>
>There are hundreds of substitutes:
>e.g.:
>
>toot your horn
>
>pass gas
>
>cut the cheese
>
>
>I wouldn't consider it obscene. I classify it with words like "crap"
>and "piss." Sort of intermediate on the obscene word hierarchy--a
>little stronger than, say, "darn" but much weaker than, say,
>"cocksucking motherfucker."

IMHO, "crap" and "fart" are probably at the same level of offensiveness, but
neither is obscene. I would say that "piss" is a little bit stronger. I would
say that "piss" crosses the line, though. "Pee" is at the same level as "crap"
and "fart", in my opinion. Around my grandmother, I could say "darn", but I
would dare not say "pee", "crap", or "fart" at all, lest she hit me with her
knitting needles. If I said "piss", she would go into vapor lock. I wouldn't
even THINK the words "cocksucking motherfucker" around her. That would mean the
end of the world.


Steve

lanza

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Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

> Which is too bad really, because the word is *ancient* and some cognate of
> it was probably used by the Indo-Europeans.

Well, for the record, I know of NO word currently considered obscene or
coarse or vulgar to frowned up that was not, at its origins, quite
acceptable and commonly used. Vulgarity, like beauty itself, is in the
I of the beholder (make that the "ego" of the beholder).

********************************************
"Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand."
--LUCAS JACKSON
********************************************

David C. Larkin

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Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

Craig Welch wrote:
>
> Gary Lum <gl...@ozemail.com.au> wrote:
>
> >In fact I'm teaching my
> >children to say flatus, passing/voiding urine and defaecate rather than
> >the childish alternatives.
>
> Does it not concern you that this will put them at odds with all of
> their friends/peers?

Isn't that spelled "peeers"?

Dave Larkin

Donna Richoux

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Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

Mark Schaefer <Mark_S...@notpartofmyaddress.csgi.com> wrote:


> Not sure about that. But I remember in middle school we sang a
> song in music class that was Old English and went something like
>
> Sumer is a-cumen in (Summer is a-comin' in)
> Lude sing cucku (Loudly sing cuckoo)
> Bloweth sed and groweth med (Seed blows and mead
> (food) grows)
> and springeth wude new (And springs the woods anew) ...

>We never made it to the second verse which I learned in a college
history of English class contained the following line:
>
> Bucke sterteth lombe ferteth... (The buck starts, the lamb farts...)

Cute story, but I'm skeptical. "ferteth" sounds very much like the
family of words meaning "to go forth." Lambs are much more famous for
scampering about than for farting.

"The Viking Book of Poetry of the English-Speaking World" has that verse
differently, anyhow:

Awe bleteth after lomb
Lhouth after calve cu;
Bulluc sterteth, bucke verteth;
Msrie sing cuccu.

The footnote translates "verteth" as "hides in the green wood."

This is a large anthology for general audiences, not children, so I have
no reason to accuse the editor of Bowdlerism.

Best wishes --- Donna Richoux


Brian J Goggin

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Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

On 21 Nov 1997 12:55:56 GMT, tr...@euronet.nl (Donna Richoux) wrote:

[...]

>"The Viking Book of Poetry of the English-Speaking World" has that verse
>differently, anyhow:
>
> Awe bleteth after lomb
> Lhouth after calve cu;
> Bulluc sterteth, bucke verteth;
> Msrie sing cuccu.
>
>The footnote translates "verteth" as "hides in the green wood."

I wonder where they got that notion? The OED gives

===begins=====

verte, southern ME. var. fart v.

===ends=====

On turning to "fart", we (noting with interest the first citation)
find

===begins=====

fart (____), v. Not now in decent use. Also 3 verte-n, 4 farten, 5
farton, 6 farte.
[Common Teut. and Indo-germanic: OE. *feortan = OHG. ferzan (MHG.
verzen, and with ablaut variants vurzen, varzen, mod.G. farzen), ON.
freta:---OTeut. *fertan:---OAryan *perd- (Skr. pard. prd, Gr. _______,
Lith. pérdzu, Russ. perdet_; the L. pedere is unconnected).]
1. intr. To break wind (see break v. 47).
_1250 Cuckoo Song, Bulluc sterteŽ, bucke uerteŽ.
_1386 Chaucer Miller's T. 152 He was somdel squaymous Of fartyng.
_1440 Promp. Parv. 150 Farton, pedo.
_1532 G. Du Wes Introd. Fr. in Palsgr. 941/1 To farte or to burste,
crepiter.
1610 B. Jonson Alch. i. i, I fart at thee.
1740 Gray Lett. Wks. 1884 II. 59 Now they are always in a sweat, and
never speak, but they f---t.
fig.
[after L. oppedere.]
1580 Baret Alv. F 149 To fart against one: and Metaphoricč, To denie
with a lowd voice, oppedere.
1671 H. M. tr. Erasm. Colloq. 503, I cannot sufficiently admire, that
there are not some men who fart against those men.

[...]

===ends=====

For "vert /v/" the OED gives

===begins=====

vert, v.1
[ad. L. vertere to turn, overturn, etc.]
_ 1. trans. To turn up, root up (the ground).

[...]

2. To turn in a particular direction; to turn or twist out of the
normal position. Now spec. in Path. or Anat. Hence
_verting ppl. a.

[...]

3. intr. To change direction; to dart about.

[...]

===ends=====

And for "vert, v.2"

===begins=====

vert, v.2 Also 'vert.
[f. vert n.2]
intr. To become a convert from one religion to another, esp. to Roman
Catholicism.
1888 Echo 17 Mar. (Cassell's), As a man he is welcome to vert and
re-vert as often as he pleases.
1891 Hist. Sk. Par. St. Martin, Colchester 7 William Murray_'verted to
the Roman Church after J. H. Newman.

===ends=====

bjg


Mark Schaefer

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Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
to

> Craig Welch wrote:
> >
> > Gary Lum <gl...@ozemail.com.au> wrote:
> >

> > >Who says? I use the word flatus all the time. In fact I'm teaching my


> > >children to say flatus, passing/voiding urine and defaecate rather than
> > >the childish alternatives.
> >
> > Does it not concern you that this will put them at odds with all of
> > their friends/peers?
>

> Gee, I thought that was one of its chief virtues. Maybe
> they can even raise the lowest common denominator among
> themselves.

People who attempt to raise the lowest common denominator on the school
playground wind up with their glasses broken and their lunch money taken.

Mark Schaefer

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Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
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In article <19971121043...@ladder01.news.aol.com>,
stevi...@aol.com (Stevicus63) wrote:

> >From: brow...@concentric.net (Stan Brown)
> >Date: Wed, Nov 19, 1997 18:48 EST
> >Message-id: <MPG.edd44d2d...@news.concentric.net>
> >
> >In article <347314FA...@geocities.com>, gl...@geocities.com (Jimmy

> >Lio) wrote:
> >>Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
> >>the word?
> >

> >Vulgar but not obscene, I believe. "Break wind" is the customary
> >euphemism.
> >

> >But etiquette has a better solution: it is at least as rude to notice or
> >comment as it is to commit the act -- more so, actually, since the act
> >was presumably not a matter of choice and making comment assuredly is.
>

> Sometimes, when someone farts, the farter might say something like: "Oh, there
> must be some geese flying overhead." But that's only among friends. In polite
> company, best not say anything at all.

I heard a classic one on TV once: "Did one o' you boys bring a tree frog
to work today?"

Evan Kirshenbaum

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Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
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Truly Donovan <tr...@lunemere.com> writes:

> Craig Welch wrote:
> >
> > Gary Lum <gl...@ozemail.com.au> wrote:
> >
> > >Who says? I use the word flatus all the time. In fact I'm teaching my
> > >children to say flatus, passing/voiding urine and defaecate rather than
> > >the childish alternatives.
> >
> > Does it not concern you that this will put them at odds with all of
> > their friends/peers?
>
> Gee, I thought that was one of its chief virtues. Maybe
> they can even raise the lowest common denominator among
> themselves.

If by some chance they are successful, I would expect that these words
would quickly become exactly as stigmatized as the words they are
being taught to avoid, and people will invent a new set of euphemisms.

--
Evan Kirshenbaum +------------------------------------
HP Laboratories |The mystery of government is not how
1501 Page Mill Road, Building 1U |Washington works, but how to make it
Palo Alto, CA 94304 |stop.
| P.J. O'Rourke
kirsh...@hpl.hp.com
(650)857-7572

http://www.hpl.hp.com/personal/Evan_Kirshenbaum/

RON BANISTER

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Nov 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/21/97
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njk...@mindspringerspaniel.com (Mimi Kahn) wrote:-

MK>My Concise Oxford has "fart" and refers to the word as "coarse."

The Fowler brothers' 1911 edition of that work pronounces
the word to be "indecent" and points to its "Aryan"
ancestry. They recognised obscene as one of the meanings
of "coarse" but chose a less equivocal definition. So, I
believe, did the Law -- at one time.
---
* SLMR 2.1 *


lanza

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Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

This song (SUMER IS ICUMEN IN/c. 1310), performed by St. George's
Canzona/John Sothcott, is included, modernized, on the Summer album of
the ASV CD series devoted to the seasons (Academy Sound and Vision
LTD/CD QS 6114):

Summer has come in
Loudly sing, cuckoo!
The seeds grow and the meadow blossoms
And the wood now puts forth shoots.
Sing, cuckoo!
The ew bleats for the lamb
The cow lows for the calf;
The Bullock leaps
The buck farts.
Merrily sing, cuckoo!
Cuckoo, cuckoo!
Well do yuou sing, cuckoo!
Do not ever cease now.

>
>

--

Shakib Otaqui

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Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

On 20 Nov, in article <651sol$49...@fido.asd.sgi.com>
le...@diver.engr.sgi.com "Lee Jones" wrote:

LJ> I've often wondered how many people got the joke in the title of Spinal
LJ> Tap's "album" "Break Like The Wind".

Generations of English schoolboys have bee inordinately
amused by King Lear's heartfelt cry "Blow, winds, and crack
your cheeks!".

--

A poet is someone who likes to smell his own farts. (W H Auden)
_____________________________________________________________________
Shakib Otaqui Al-Quds Consult


Justme®

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Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

On Sat, 22 Nov 1997 21:33:47 +0930, Gary Lum <gl...@ozemail.com.au>
shared:

>Craig Welch wrote:
>
>> >Who says? I use the word flatus all the time. In fact I'm teaching my
>> >children to say flatus, passing/voiding urine and defaecate rather than
>> >the childish alternatives.
>
>> Does it not concern you that this will put them at odds with all of
>> their friends/peers?
>
>No, my folks taught me the same words and I used them. My friends (and
>enemies for that matter) just figured it was the way children of medical
>practitioners spoke. I was never made fun of. Perhaps I'm fortunate.

I am reminded of a relative of mine, who taught her children to use
the word 'defecate' instead of 'poop'. One day in preschool, her son
told the teacher that he needed to defecate.

The teacher had to grab her dictionary to see what the poor child was
talking about.

--Ginny
alt.aol-sucks Troll Patrol
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This post brought to you by Smith & Wesson:
"The original point and click interface."

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Gary Lum

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Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
to

Craig Welch wrote:

> >Who says? I use the word flatus all the time. In fact I'm teaching my
> >children to say flatus, passing/voiding urine and defaecate rather than
> >the childish alternatives.

> Does it not concern you that this will put them at odds with all of
> their friends/peers?

No, my folks taught me the same words and I used them. My friends (and
enemies for that matter) just figured it was the way children of medical
practitioners spoke. I was never made fun of. Perhaps I'm fortunate.

Regards

A M Roxwell

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Nov 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/26/97
to


Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com> wrote in article
<347314FA...@geocities.com>...


> Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
> the word?
>

It's not obscene, but it is highly questionable, probably impolite and care
should be taken to avoid giving accidental offence (and if giving offence
is likely, it is probably better to avoid the subject altogether).

Substitutes exist - following a selection from British English:

(verb) to trump, blow off, let Jimmy out of jail, parp, break wind, suffer
flatulence, guff, let rip, let off

(noun) silent waft, silent but deadly, silent but violent (SBV),
disemboguement, flatulence, flatus

(idiom) old fart = old man, geezer.
Jonny Fartpants = character from comic 'Viz'

AMRO

PS: I' ve heard Swedish has different verbs for a wet fart and a dry fart.
Is this true, and what are they?


Kay Freeman

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Nov 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/26/97
to

A M Roxwell wrote:
>
> Jimmy Lio <gl...@geocities.com> wrote in article
> <347314FA...@geocities.com>...
> > Is the word "fart" considered as an obscence word? Any substitute for
> > the word?
> >
>
> It's not obscene, but it is highly questionable, probably impolite and care
> should be taken to avoid giving accidental offence (and if giving offence
> is likely, it is probably better to avoid the subject altogether).
>
> Substitutes exist - following a selection from British English:
>
> (verb) to trump, blow off, let Jimmy out of jail, parp, break wind, suffer
> flatulence, guff, let rip, let off
>
> (noun) silent waft, silent but deadly, silent but violent (SBV),
> disemboguement, flatulence, flatus
>
> (idiom) old fart = old man, geezer.
> Jonny Fartpants = character from comic 'Viz'
>
> AMRO
>
And then there's the onomatopoeiac "borborygmus," a serendipitous
dictionary find of mine when I was about 13 and of an age to delight in
it.

Kay Freeman

Tom

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Nov 28, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/28/97
to

Kay Freeman (kj-fr...@worldnet.att.net) wrote:
:
: And then there's the onomatopoeiac "borborygmus," a serendipitous

: dictionary find of mine when I was about 13 and of an age to delight in
: it.

It is a truly lovely word...but OED says it's rumbling *within* the gut,
not from it.

Tom Parsons
--
--
t...@panix.com | Whenever you find yourself on the side
| of the majority, it is time to reform.
http://www.panix.com/~twp | --Mark Twain

JesiAna

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Nov 29, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/29/97
to

I believe the scientific word is "flatulate," which is the verb. Flatulence
would be the noun, i.e., the state of flatulating, and flatulent would describe
the person who is flatulating.

I tell my second graders they may only refer to it as "flatulated," thus
heading off those loud comments of "ewww, somebody farted!" However, one day
during a fit of nose-holding and giggles, a little boy couldn't think of the
word, and remarked, "She blew up!" Needless to say, the teacher cracked up!

Gary Lum

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Nov 30, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/30/97
to JesiAna

JesiAna wrote:

> I believe the scientific word is "flatulate," which is the verb. Flatulence
> would be the noun, i.e., the state of flatulating, and flatulent would describe
> the person who is flatulating.

I understood it was flatus (noun) and there is no such word as
flatulate. Just like urinate is not a real word. Better to say
micturate as that is the action. Passing flatus is the term we use or
just good old fart! It's not the gas that causes the passage, it's the
combination of pressure build up and the reaction of the large bowel to
pressure.

H Gilmer

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Nov 30, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/30/97
to

Gary Lum (gl...@ozemail.com.au) wrote:

: Just like urinate is not a real word.

It is now. And has been for decades. It might not be an acceptable
bit of medical terminology, but it's in the language (and the
dictionaries), like it or not.


: ********************************************************

: Dr Gary Lum
: Director of Microbiology and Pathology
: Royal Darwin Hospital


Hg


Markus Laker

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Nov 30, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/30/97
to

gil...@uts.cc.utexas.edu (H Gilmer):

> Gary Lum (gl...@ozemail.com.au) wrote:
>
> : Just like urinate is not a real word.
>
> It is now. And has been for decades.

Yes. About forty decades, according to the OED.

Just how old does a word have to be before you welcome it into the
language, Gary?

Markus Laker

--
My real address doesn't include a Christian name.
Emailed copies of responses are very much appreciated.

Simon Hosie

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Dec 1, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/1/97
to

Gary Lum:

> I understood it was flatus (noun) and there is no such word as
> flatulate. Just like urinate is not a real word.

Surely if "urine" is a noun then one could "urinate" the ground?


--
# Gumboot, at an ISP named Clear.Net, in New Zealand.
#
# Please try to quote only the text you need to show the context of your
# response.

Max Crittenden

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Dec 2, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/2/97
to

Gary Lum wrote:

> I understood it was flatus (noun) and there is no such word as
> flatulate. Just like urinate is not a real word.

Huh? Sorry, I haven't been following this thread closely so
I may have missed something, but "urinate" is certainly a word.
It's in my dictionary anyway.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Max Crittenden Menlo Park, California
For e-mail, replace "lanka" with the other part
of the name of that island nation south of India.

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