=SDC= Q50: Froglorn Leghorn

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Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 23, 2011, 6:01:49 AM8/23/11
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===
It was a dark and stormy night and low clouds, roiling overhead like a
drab rug gyrated by a hidden horde of frenzied Diabolonians, hurled down
rain by the gallon to obliterate Professor Doktor Xenophrasticus van
Leghorn's little party as it emerged at last from the forest of giant
asparagus ("Ah! Cleidaceae!" the big Boer gasped, flushing with
childlike pleasure, when he first saw the plant: "The asparagine
bracteate equivalence is wholly specious!") and squinted, blinking, from
the rim of the crater at a spectacle vested with such horror that none
could later say how they had remained steadfast, ambulant and continent,
though love of the Vulcan Diamond (or Patina) Frog and fear of the tall,
indomitable colonial scholar's scorn certainly played their parts: at
the centre of a heathen necropolis a bonfire defied the downpour and
illuminated a wheeled pagan temple - a barbarian version of those little
shacks from which the fairer sex bathes at Brighton - before which
thousands of orange frogs with amber limbs and a curious greenish
lozenge on their backs were being subjected to acts of an unspeakably
evil nature by ninety-nine ape-like creatures wearing chainmail and
macabre masks with big rubber noses while the hundredth, the simians'
evil leader, prepared himself for the sombre slaughter of the gaudy,
chirruping innocents by tightening his belt-buckle, effortlessly moving
the heavy oaken temple back ten yards and, after wiping his hands with a
damp rag, lighting the fuse of a grenade.

"Those misobatrachian vandals down there," said the prof, gesturing
dismissively at the crater. "I find them uniquely creepy. But behave
nicely, as gentle as you can be, eh? Aim to kill them quickly - thoracic
or in the throat. And don't step on any frogs or I'll dock your pay."

Next week: Who won and how.
===

How many exonyms of European cities can you find in the above? All
exonyms must use the unaccented 26-letter Latin alphabet. Endonyms can
be in any alphabet. Cities can't be used twice. Cities can overlap.
Archaic exonyms (e.g. Leghorn, Cleves) aren't allowed. In each case,
provide the exonym, a language that uses it, and the endonym or its
usual English version.

A Cormo for the first to list all exonyms that the Panel knows of in the
text above. A Touabaire for whoever has listed the greatest number of
exonyms when the question is closed.

Special bonus: a Cormo for the exonym of a small North American
community.

--
VB
T. O. Panellist

James Hogg

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Aug 23, 2011, 9:07:52 AM8/23/11
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Here's what I've found so far:

Bruggy, Czech for Bruges
Bolonia, Spanish for Bologna
Flushing, English for Vlissingen (or is that archaic?)
Ginebra, Catalan for Geneva
Stambul, Polish for Istanbul
Candia, Italian for Iraklio
Tallin, Spanish for Tallinn
Lisabon, Slovak for Lisbon
Gant, Catalan for Ghent
Anvers, French for Antwerp
Berlim, Portuguese for Berlin
Vilna, Slovenian for Vilnius
Neapel, Swedish for Naples
Mailand, German for Milan
Berno, Polish for Bern
Seville, English for Sevilla
Breslau, German for Wroclaw
Kleef, Dutch for Cleves
Prag, German for Prague
Munique, Portuguese for Munich


--
James

CDB

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Aug 23, 2011, 10:49:27 AM8/23/11
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Couple more near the end:
>>
Venice, English for Venezia;
Corinth, English for Korinthos.


musika

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Aug 23, 2011, 3:01:10 PM8/23/11
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Then there's
Ragusa, Italian for Dubrovnik.
--
Ray
UK

musika

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Aug 23, 2011, 3:13:12 PM8/23/11
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Dorpat, German for Tartu.
--
Ray
UK

musika

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Aug 23, 2011, 3:20:06 PM8/23/11
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Athen, German et al for Athens
--
Ray
UK

musika

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Aug 23, 2011, 3:31:28 PM8/23/11
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Brema, Italian for Bremen.
--
Ray
UK

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 23, 2011, 6:44:22 PM8/23/11
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In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:

>Flushing, English for Vlissingen (or is that archaic?)

Only if I am. That's what we called it in when my family went there in
the '60s.

(I didn't think anyone calls Kleve Cleves. Most of us talk about
Anneofcleves without really associating her name with a real place. The
exceptions probably call her Anne of Kleve.)

The Polish 'Stambul', however, is dodgy. The L has a bar through it.

Try the Latvian, Stambula.

LFS

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Aug 24, 2011, 1:53:34 AM8/24/11
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In 1962 my parents sent me on an organised holiday to Blankenberg. I
remember very little about it, apart from delicious icecream and at some
point visiting both Flushing and Sluis, which I found rather funny.

--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)


James Hogg

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Aug 24, 2011, 3:04:48 AM8/24/11
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OK then:

Stambula, Latvian for Istanbul

plus

Gand, French for Ghent
Turin, English for Torino
Atina, Bosnian for Athens
Wasa, a spelling you sometimes see in English and Swedish for Vaasa in
Finland
I suppose Grena could be called an exonym for Grenå in Denmark

In an ideal world, Lozen would be Lausanne in some language, but I can
only find Lozan, e.g. in Turkish

Linkin, illiterate for Lincoln

--
James

James Hogg

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Aug 24, 2011, 3:07:54 AM8/24/11
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James Hogg wrote:
> Vinny Burgoo wrote:
>> In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:
>>
>>> Flushing, English for Vlissingen (or is that archaic?)
>> Only if I am. That's what we called it in when my family went there in
>> the '60s.
>>
>> (I didn't think anyone calls Kleve Cleves. Most of us talk about
>> Anneofcleves without really associating her name with a real place. The
>> exceptions probably call her Anne of Kleve.)
>>
>> The Polish 'Stambul', however, is dodgy. The L has a bar through it.
>>
>> Try the Latvian, Stambula.
>
> OK then:
>
> Stambula, Latvian for Istanbul
>
> plus
>
> Gand, French for Ghent
> Turin, English for Torino
> Atina, Bosnian for Athens
> Wasa, a spelling you sometimes see in English and Swedish for Vaasa in
> Finland
> I suppose Grena could be called an exonym for Grenĺ in Denmark

>
> In an ideal world, Lozen would be Lausanne in some language, but I can
> only find Lozan, e.g. in Turkish
>
> Linkin, illiterate for Lincoln

And how could I forget this?

Colonia, Italian for Köln

--
James

Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Aug 24, 2011, 8:14:14 AM8/24/11
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Is it really possible that I've found one that James missed? Or is it
just that I've missed it in his list?

Boergas, Dutch for Burgas


--
athel

James Hogg

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Aug 24, 2011, 9:17:47 AM8/24/11
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Athel Cornish-Bowden wrote:
> On 2011-08-24 09:07:54 +0200, James Hogg <Jas....@gOUTmail.com> said:
>
>> James Hogg wrote:
>>> Vinny Burgoo wrote:
>>>> In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Flushing, English for Vlissingen (or is that archaic?)
>>>> Only if I am. That's what we called it in when my family went there in
>>>> the '60s.
>>>>
>>>> (I didn't think anyone calls Kleve Cleves. Most of us talk about
>>>> Anneofcleves without really associating her name with a real place. The
>>>> exceptions probably call her Anne of Kleve.)
>>>>
>>>> The Polish 'Stambul', however, is dodgy. The L has a bar through it.
>>>>
>>>> Try the Latvian, Stambula.
>>>
>>> OK then:
>>>
>>> Stambula, Latvian for Istanbul
>>>
>>> plus
>>>
>>> Gand, French for Ghent
>>> Turin, English for Torino
>>> Atina, Bosnian for Athens
>>> Wasa, a spelling you sometimes see in English and Swedish for Vaasa in
>>> Finland
>>> I suppose Grena could be called an exonym for Grenå in Denmark

>>>
>>> In an ideal world, Lozen would be Lausanne in some language, but I can
>>> only find Lozan, e.g. in Turkish
>>>
>>> Linkin, illiterate for Lincoln
>>
>> And how could I forget this?
>>
>> Colonia, Italian for Köln
>
> Is it really possible that I've found one that James missed? Or is it
> just that I've missed it in his list?
>
> Boergas, Dutch for Burgas

It's perfectly possible to find ones that I missed. In the words "behave
nicely" I was so desperately trying to think of a place-name Haven that
I missed Venice.

Leida, Portuguese for Leiden
Valence, French for Valencia
Lontoo, Finnish for London
Rim, Croatian for Rome
Rom, Danish for Rome

--
James

musika

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Aug 24, 2011, 9:45:29 AM8/24/11
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Damn, I just got Leida and Valence. According to the rules I don't think you
can use Rome twice.
--
Ray
UK

James Hogg

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Aug 24, 2011, 10:00:36 AM8/24/11
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James Hogg wrote:
> Athel Cornish-Bowden wrote:
>> On 2011-08-24 09:07:54 +0200, James Hogg <Jas....@gOUTmail.com> said:
>>
>>> James Hogg wrote:
>>>> Vinny Burgoo wrote:
>>>>> In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Flushing, English for Vlissingen (or is that archaic?)
>>>>> Only if I am. That's what we called it in when my family went there in
>>>>> the '60s.
>>>>>
>>>>> (I didn't think anyone calls Kleve Cleves. Most of us talk about
>>>>> Anneofcleves without really associating her name with a real place. The
>>>>> exceptions probably call her Anne of Kleve.)
>>>>>
>>>>> The Polish 'Stambul', however, is dodgy. The L has a bar through it.
>>>>>
>>>>> Try the Latvian, Stambula.
>>>> OK then:
>>>>
>>>> Stambula, Latvian for Istanbul
>>>>
>>>> plus
>>>>
>>>> Gand, French for Ghent
>>>> Turin, English for Torino
>>>> Atina, Bosnian for Athens
>>>> Wasa, a spelling you sometimes see in English and Swedish for Vaasa in
>>>> Finland
>>>> I suppose Grena could be called an exonym for Grenĺ in Denmark

>>>>
>>>> In an ideal world, Lozen would be Lausanne in some language, but I can
>>>> only find Lozan, e.g. in Turkish
>>>>
>>>> Linkin, illiterate for Lincoln
>>> And how could I forget this?
>>>
>>> Colonia, Italian for Köln
>> Is it really possible that I've found one that James missed? Or is it
>> just that I've missed it in his list?
>>
>> Boergas, Dutch for Burgas
>
> It's perfectly possible to find ones that I missed. In the words "behave
> nicely" I was so desperately trying to think of a place-name Haven that
> I missed Venice.
>
> Leida, Portuguese for Leiden
> Valence, French for Valencia
> Lontoo, Finnish for London
> Rim, Croatian for Rome
> Rom, Danish for Rome

Aken, Dutch for Aachen

--
James

James Hogg

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Aug 24, 2011, 10:03:32 AM8/24/11
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>>>>> I suppose Grena could be called an exonym for Grenĺ in Denmark

>>>>>
>>>>> In an ideal world, Lozen would be Lausanne in some language, but I
>>>>> can only find Lozan, e.g. in Turkish
>>>>>
>>>>> Linkin, illiterate for Lincoln
>>>>
>>>> And how could I forget this?
>>>>
>>>> Colonia, Italian for Köln
>>>
>>> Is it really possible that I've found one that James missed? Or is it
>>> just that I've missed it in his list?
>>>
>>> Boergas, Dutch for Burgas
>>
>> It's perfectly possible to find ones that I missed. In the words
>> "behave nicely" I was so desperately trying to think of a place-name
>> Haven that I missed Venice.
>>
>> Leida, Portuguese for Leiden
>> Valence, French for Valencia
>> Lontoo, Finnish for London
>> Rim, Croatian for Rome
>> Rom, Danish for Rome
>
> Damn, I just got Leida and Valence. According to the rules I don't think
> you can use Rome twice.

You're right. I got carried away. I've broken the rules twice. I have
two Ghents as well.

--
James

Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Aug 24, 2011, 10:16:52 AM8/24/11
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On 2011-08-24 15:17:47 +0200, James Hogg <Jas....@gOUTmail.com> said:

> Athel Cornish-Bowden wrote:
>> On 2011-08-24 09:07:54 +0200, James Hogg <Jas....@gOUTmail.com> said:
>>
>>> James Hogg wrote:
>>>> Vinny Burgoo wrote:
>>>>> In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Flushing, English for Vlissingen (or is that archaic?)
>>>>> Only if I am. That's what we called it in when my family went there in
>>>>> the '60s.
>>>>>
>>>>> (I didn't think anyone calls Kleve Cleves. Most of us talk about
>>>>> Anneofcleves without really associating her name with a real place. The
>>>>> exceptions probably call her Anne of Kleve.)
>>>>>
>>>>> The Polish 'Stambul', however, is dodgy. The L has a bar through it.
>>>>>
>>>>> Try the Latvian, Stambula.
>>>>
>>>> OK then:
>>>>
>>>> Stambula, Latvian for Istanbul
>>>>
>>>> plus
>>>>
>>>> Gand, French for Ghent
>>>> Turin, English for Torino
>>>> Atina, Bosnian for Athens
>>>> Wasa, a spelling you sometimes see in English and Swedish for Vaasa in
>>>> Finland

>>>> I suppose Grena could be called an exonym for Grenĺ in Denmark


>>>>
>>>> In an ideal world, Lozen would be Lausanne in some language, but I can
>>>> only find Lozan, e.g. in Turkish
>>>>
>>>> Linkin, illiterate for Lincoln
>>>
>>> And how could I forget this?
>>>
>>> Colonia, Italian for Köln
>>
>> Is it really possible that I've found one that James missed? Or is it
>> just that I've missed it in his list?
>>
>> Boergas, Dutch for Burgas
>
> It's perfectly possible to find ones that I missed. In the words "behave
> nicely" I was so desperately trying to think of a place-name Haven that
> I missed Venice.
>
> Leida, Portuguese for Leiden
> Valence, French for Valencia
> Lontoo, Finnish for London
> Rim, Croatian for Rome
> Rom, Danish for Rome

OK. You're certainly a lot better at it than I am, nonetheless. I felt
sure there had to be a reason for writing "Boer" rather than "Dutchman".


--
athel

Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Aug 24, 2011, 10:36:47 AM8/24/11
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>>>>> I suppose Grena could be called an exonym for Gren� in Denmark


>>>>>
>>>>> In an ideal world, Lozen would be Lausanne in some language, but I
>>>>> can only find Lozan, e.g. in Turkish
>>>>>
>>>>> Linkin, illiterate for Lincoln
>>>>
>>>> And how could I forget this?
>>>>

>>>> Colonia, Italian for K�ln


>>>
>>> Is it really possible that I've found one that James missed? Or is it
>>> just that I've missed it in his list?
>>>
>>> Boergas, Dutch for Burgas
>>
>> It's perfectly possible to find ones that I missed. In the words
>> "behave nicely" I was so desperately trying to think of a place-name
>> Haven that I missed Venice.
>>
>> Leida, Portuguese for Leiden
>> Valence, French for Valencia
>> Lontoo, Finnish for London
>> Rim, Croatian for Rome
>> Rom, Danish for Rome
>
> Damn, I just got Leida and Valence. According to the rules I don't
> think you can use Rome twice.

On the other hand I feel sure some language must call Lleida Leida.
Catalan has an enthusiasm for starting words with Ll that even the
Welsh must envy, but it's not shared by most other languages (even
Castilian, which uses ll much less than Catalan does). However, the
only page that I can find that uses Leida for Lleida makes it look more
like a misspelling than an exonym.

Got it! Aragonese spells it Leida (and as it's pretty darn close to
Aragon their opinion should carry some weight!).


--
athel

Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Aug 24, 2011, 10:51:47 AM8/24/11
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On 2011-08-23 12:01:49 +0200, Vinny Burgoo <hlu...@yahoo.co.uk> said:

> ===
> It was a dark and stormy night...

Lanta (French, and I suppose English) for Occitan Lantar


--
athel

Lars Enderin

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Aug 24, 2011, 12:49:59 PM8/24/11
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2011-08-24 09:04, James Hogg skrev:

> Wasa, a spelling you sometimes see in English and Swedish for Vaasa in
> Finland

The current Swedish name is Vasa, though. Note that the Swedish names of
places in Finland are often the original names, since Finland was a
Swedish province for hundreds of years. For example, Helsingfors is at
least as valid a name as Helsinki, and I think Åbo predated Turku.

James Hogg

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Aug 24, 2011, 1:08:13 PM8/24/11
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How does the panel define exonym? Vasa is an endonym for the
Swedish-speaking minority in Finland (as it was for the Swedish-speaking
majority that used to exist in that city). Can Anvers be called an
exonym in Belgium when French is one of the official languages in
Belgium? There must be native French speakers even in Antwerp.

--
James

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 24, 2011, 2:36:12 PM8/24/11
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In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:

For this question, if a city is in a generally X-speaking area then the
name in X is an endonym. If people who speak Y have a name for it that
is different (incl. mere spelling) to the name in X then the name in Y
is an exonym. It doesn't matter who founded the city or whether the
country is officially multilingual.

'City' might also need a definition. The Panel has yet to discuss this
properly. It had an informal rule that, to count as a city, a settlement
had to have a population larger than 100,000. That doesn't tally with
real-world English usage so might be relaxed.

(Vaasa has a population of about 60,000.)

--
VB
T. O. Arbitrary

Joe Fineman

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Aug 24, 2011, 5:27:22 PM8/24/11
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"musika" <mUs...@SPAMNOTexcite.com> writes:

> Ragusa, Italian for Dubrovnik.

Even more wonderful, Tsarephat, Hebrew for France.
--
--- Joe Fineman jo...@verizon.net

||: Who would not rather read a story about people catching fish :||
||: than a story about people eating fish? :||

msh210

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Aug 24, 2011, 5:37:59 PM8/24/11
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On Aug 24, Joe Fineman abed:

> Even more wonderful, Tsarephat, Hebrew for France.

Sorry, the rules say:
# All exonyms must use the unaccented 26-letter Latin alphabet.

Michael Hamm
TO Panelist

musika

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Aug 24, 2011, 5:40:21 PM8/24/11
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Joe Fineman wrote:
> "musika" <mUs...@SPAMNOTexcite.com> writes:
>
>> Ragusa, Italian for Dubrovnik.
>
> Even more wonderful, Tsarephat, Hebrew for France.
>
?

--
Ray
UK

Peter Moylan

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Aug 24, 2011, 9:01:26 PM8/24/11
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There are; I used to be married to one. The francophone Anversois call
the place Anvers at home, although they generally call it Antwerpen when
they're out in public. (In some quarters, there is hostility towards
speaking French in public.) We should consider, though, that those
people are outnumbered by far by the people in France who call it Anvers.

Likewise, there must be more Swedish speakers outside Finland than inside.

--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 2:32:04 PM8/25/11
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This one collides with the Panel's definition of 'exonym' (Lanta is in a
generally French-speaking area) and bumps gently but fatally against its
undefined definition of 'city'.

Which is a shame. There must be some T. O. exonyms in the text that the
Panel didn't spot.

--
VB
T. O. European

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 2:29:47 PM8/25/11
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In alt.usage.english, Athel Cornish-Bowden wrote:

>Is it really possible that I've found one that James missed? Or is it
>just that I've missed it in his list?
>
>Boergas, Dutch for Burgas

Accepted (and spotted) by the Panel.

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 2:29:29 PM8/25/11
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In alt.usage.english, musika wrote:
>musika wrote:
>> musika wrote:

>>> Then there's
>>> Ragusa, Italian for Dubrovnik.
>> Dorpat, German for Tartu.
>Athen, German et al for Athens

Accepted (and spotted) by the Panel.

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 2:31:49 PM8/25/11
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In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:
>James Hogg wrote:

>> Leida, Portuguese for Leiden
>> Valence, French for Valencia
>> Lontoo, Finnish for London
>> Rim, Croatian for Rome
>> Rom, Danish for Rome
>
>Aken, Dutch for Aachen

Four accepted (and spotted) by the Panel. 'Rom' is a self-duplicate.

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 2:30:11 PM8/25/11
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In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:

>And how could I forget this?
>
>Colonia, Italian for Köln

Accepted (and spotted) by the Panel.

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 2:30:32 PM8/25/11
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In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:

>Here's what I've found so far:
>
>Bruggy, Czech for Bruges
>Bolonia, Spanish for Bologna

>Flushing, English for Vlissingen (or is that archaic?)

>Ginebra, Catalan for Geneva
>Stambul, Polish for Istanbul
>Candia, Italian for Iraklio
>Tallin, Spanish for Tallinn
>Lisabon, Slovak for Lisbon
>Gant, Catalan for Ghent
>Anvers, French for Antwerp
>Berlim, Portuguese for Berlin
>Vilna, Slovenian for Vilnius
>Neapel, Swedish for Naples
>Mailand, German for Milan
>Berno, Polish for Bern
>Seville, English for Sevilla
>Breslau, German for Wroclaw
>Kleef, Dutch for Cleves
>Prag, German for Prague
>Munique, Portuguese for Munich

Accepted (and spotted) by the Panel.

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 2:33:30 PM8/25/11
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In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:

[...]

>Gand, French for Ghent
>Turin, English for Torino
>Atina, Bosnian for Athens
>Wasa, a spelling you sometimes see in English and Swedish for Vaasa in
>Finland
>I suppose Grena could be called an exonym for Grenå in Denmark
>
>In an ideal world, Lozen would be Lausanne in some language, but I can
>only find Lozan, e.g. in Turkish
>
>Linkin, illiterate for Lincoln

Turin is accepted (and was spotted) by the Panel.

It didn't spot Wasa or Grena. It would need proof that Wasa is a current
exonym (as defined above somewhere) of Vaasa. Grena? No. It's too small
and its exonymity is too fragile.

Ghent is one kind of duplicate, Athens another.

--
VB
T. O. Arbitrary European

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 2:34:07 PM8/25/11
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In alt.usage.english, Athel Cornish-Bowden wrote:

>On the other hand I feel sure some language must call Lleida Leida.
>Catalan has an enthusiasm for starting words with Ll that even the
>Welsh must envy, but it's not shared by most other languages (even
>Castilian, which uses ll much less than Catalan does). However, the
>only page that I can find that uses Leida for Lleida makes it look more
>like a misspelling than an exonym.
>
>Got it! Aragonese spells it Leida (and as it's pretty darn close to
>Aragon their opinion should carry some weight!).

Aragonese? The Panel has rooms full of humble, dedicated and skilled
Googlers (on at least the minimum wage, honest) but I doubt that even
they can find 'Leida' meaning 'Lleida' in Aragonese.

Proof, please.

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 2:32:30 PM8/25/11
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In alt.usage.english, CDB wrote:

>Couple more near the end:
>
>Venice, English for Venezia;
>Corinth, English for Korinthos.

Accepted (and spotted) by the Panel.

--
VB
T. O. European

James Hogg

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Aug 25, 2011, 2:56:01 PM8/25/11
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Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 3:24:57 PM8/25/11
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In alt.usage.english, James Hogg wrote:

That was quick. (A dozen flunkies have just been fired.)

This, too, could collide with the question's definition of 'exonym' (is
Catalonia a generally Catalan-speaking area?) but it might get through.
The Panel is nothing if not democratic.

--
VB
T. O. Panellist

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 3:28:01 PM8/25/11
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musika wrote:
> musika wrote:
>> musika wrote:
>>> musika wrote:
>>>> Ragusa, Italian for Dubrovnik.
>>> Dorpat, German for Tartu.
>> Athen, German et al for Athens
> Brema, Italian for Bremen.
Bon, Albanian for Bonn
--
Ray
UK

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 25, 2011, 3:33:48 PM8/25/11
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'Bon' accepted (and spotted) by the Panel.

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 3:38:12 PM8/25/11
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Bolonia, Basque for Bologna
--
Ray
UK

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 3:51:37 PM8/25/11
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Turin, Czech for Torino
--
Ray
UK

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 3:56:33 PM8/25/11
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Prag, Danish for Praha
--
Ray
UK

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 4:04:24 PM8/25/11
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musika wrote:
>Ragusa, Italian for Dubrovnik.
> Dorpat, German for Tartu.
> Athen, German et al for Athens
> Brema, Italian for Bremen.
> Bon, Albanian for Bonn
> Bolonia, Basque for Bologna
> Turin, Czech for Torino
> Prag, Danish for Praha
Aken, Dutch for Aachen
--
Ray
UK

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 4:23:01 PM8/25/11
to
Vilna, Finnish for Vilnius
--
Ray
UK

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 4:28:39 PM8/25/11
to
Gand, French for Gent
--
Ray
UK

Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Aug 25, 2011, 4:45:19 PM8/25/11
to

Most definitely, especially in a smaller city like Lleida.

> but it might get through. The Panel is nothing if not democratic.


--
athel

Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Aug 25, 2011, 4:47:22 PM8/25/11
to
On 2011-08-25 20:32:04 +0200, Vinny Burgoo said:

> In alt.usage.english, Athel Cornish-Bowden wrote:
>> On 2011-08-23 12:01:49 +0200, Vinny Burgoo <hlu...@yahoo.co.uk> said:
>>
>>> ===
>>> It was a dark and stormy night...
>>
>> Lanta (French, and I suppose English) for Occitan Lantar
>
> This one collides with the Panel's definition of 'exonym' (Lanta is in
> a generally French-speaking area)

True. Not much Occitan spoken in France.

> and bumps gently but fatally against its undefined definition of 'city'.

Definitely. I forgot that requirement.

>
> Which is a shame. There must be some T. O. exonyms in the text that the
> Panel didn't spot.


--
athel

Joe Fineman

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Aug 25, 2011, 5:08:15 PM8/25/11
to
msh210 <msh...@gmail.com> writes:

> On Aug 24, Joe Fineman abed:
>> Even more wonderful, Tsarephat, Hebrew for France.
>
> Sorry, the rules say:
> # All exonyms must use the unaccented 26-letter Latin alphabet.

I apologize. I did not read the beginning of this thread, and did not
realize that it was a contest. I will eschew =SDC= threads in
future.


--
--- Joe Fineman jo...@verizon.net

||: Beware of single-issue people and multiple-issue :||
||: organizations. :||

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 5:12:22 PM8/25/11
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Efrog, Welsh for York
--
Ray
UK

James Hogg

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Aug 25, 2011, 5:19:12 PM8/25/11
to

Well spotted!

--
James

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 5:32:24 PM8/25/11
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Thanks. I knew frogs were there for a reason.
--
Ray
UK

James Hogg

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Aug 25, 2011, 6:04:53 PM8/25/11
to

And here's a blindingly obvious one that we have all missed:

Grenade, French for Granada

--
James

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 6:13:38 PM8/25/11
to

Ha! I looked up Grenade but didn't find the association. Bugger!
--
Ray
UK

James Hogg

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Aug 25, 2011, 6:24:39 PM8/25/11
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Then there is Nis, which could be Turkish for Nice or English for Ni�.

--
James

musika

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Aug 25, 2011, 6:27:43 PM8/25/11
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> Then there is Nis, which could be Turkish for Nice or English for Niš.

Well done. I've given up now.
--
Ray
UK

Peter Moylan

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Aug 25, 2011, 8:29:13 PM8/25/11
to

As it happens, it's also English for Torino.

--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.

Jeffrey Turner

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Aug 25, 2011, 8:48:39 PM8/25/11
to

A little Grenadine with one's sheep isn't a bad idea.

Jeffrey Turner

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Aug 25, 2011, 8:49:50 PM8/25/11
to
On 8/25/2011 5:08 PM, Joe Fineman wrote:
> msh210<msh...@gmail.com> writes:
>
>> On Aug 24, Joe Fineman abed:
>>> Even more wonderful, Tsarephat, Hebrew for France.
>>
>> Sorry, the rules say:
>> # All exonyms must use the unaccented 26-letter Latin alphabet.
>
> I apologize. I did not read the beginning of this thread, and did not
> realize that it was a contest. I will eschew =SDC= threads in
> future.

Eschew 50 times before swallowing.

R H Draney

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Aug 25, 2011, 10:56:45 PM8/25/11
to
Jeffrey Turner filted:

To put it in the mood?...r


--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.

R H Draney

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Aug 25, 2011, 11:00:08 PM8/25/11
to
Jeffrey Turner filted:

Not unless you're an alligator:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletcherize

....r

LFS

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Aug 26, 2011, 4:56:52 AM8/26/11
to

That would be for cows, shirley.

--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)


Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Aug 26, 2011, 7:55:08 AM8/26/11
to

English and French too, for that matter. I was there a few weeks ago.
"Turin" is still alive and well in French, but giving way to "Torino"
in English. (Apart from anything else English speakers don't know how
to pronounce "Turin" -- imitation French, like "Turing" without the g,
or stress on the "in".)

--
athel

Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Aug 26, 2011, 7:57:03 AM8/26/11
to
On 2011-08-26 02:29:13 +0200, Peter Moylan
<inv...@peter.pmoylan.org.invalid> said:

> musika wrote:
>> musika wrote:
>>> musika wrote:
>>>> musika wrote:
>>>>> musika wrote:
>>>>>> musika wrote:
>>>>>>> musika wrote:
>>>>>>>> Ragusa, Italian for Dubrovnik.
>>>>>>> Dorpat, German for Tartu.
>>>>>> Athen, German et al for Athens
>>>>> Brema, Italian for Bremen.
>>>> Bon, Albanian for Bonn
>>> Bolonia, Basque for Bologna
>> Turin, Czech for Torino
>
> As it happens, it's also English for Torino.

You were there before me! I didn't see this when I posted a few minutes ago.


--
athel

Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Aug 26, 2011, 8:00:55 AM8/26/11