Stashing through the snow?

266 views
Skip to first unread message

hhgygy

unread,
Dec 25, 2012, 6:09:30 AM12/25/12
to
Hi native speakers.
First of all, merry Christmas to you out there.

Secondly, I found this pun "stashing through the snow" and I see that it has something to do with moustache. Can you enlighten me upon this, please?

Thank you in advance.

Harrison Hill

unread,
Dec 25, 2012, 6:28:10 AM12/25/12
to
Assuming this not a wind-up, I think you mean "dashing through the
show". "Dash" means "go fast" - with a generous hint of "splashing" in
the way that waves "dash" against a shore, and "bashing" in the way
that way that objects can be "dashed" onto the floor.

Don Phillipson

unread,
Dec 25, 2012, 8:49:53 AM12/25/12
to
"hhgygy" <hhg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:d88c8279-d35b-47e4...@googlegroups.com...

> . . . I found this pun "stashing through the snow" and I see that it has
> something to do with moustache. Can you enlighten me upon this, please?

This pun succeeds only in N.America, where the abbreviation stash for
moustache was recently adopted by print media. (I think it had something
to do with charitable fund-raising for prostate cancer research.) The pun
would not work in Britain, where the 19th century abbreviation tash for
moustache is still current.

(But it is extremely feeble wordplay, which most language mavens would
disdain.)

--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)



CDB

unread,
Dec 25, 2012, 11:32:25 AM12/25/12
to
On 25/12/2012 6:09 AM, hhgygy wrote:

> First of all, merry Christmas to you out there.

And a happy New Year to you, and to all.

> Secondly, I found this pun "stashing through the snow" and I see that
> it has something to do with moustache. Can you enlighten me upon
> this, please?

Supposing the spelling is accurate, and not a mistake for "dashing", I
can see two possibilities: moving through snow so deep that it is at
moustache level (not easy), or moving swiftly through the snow, so that
the displaced snow makes a kind of wake to each side of you, like a
moustache. The second choice seems more likely to me, but neither of
them would be instantly clear to this native speaker.


Peter Brooks

unread,
Dec 25, 2012, 3:07:40 PM12/25/12
to
It's make more sense to me as a reflection of the advice not to eat
the yellow snow.

Helen Chadwick (nominative determinism?) made a name for herself by
slashing through the snow:

http://www.sculpture.uk.com/artists/helen_chadwick/

Tony Cooper

unread,
Dec 25, 2012, 3:33:59 PM12/25/12
to
On Tue, 25 Dec 2012 03:09:30 -0800 (PST), hhgygy <hhg...@gmail.com>
wrote:
The word "moustache" is sometimes represented with "'stache" or
"'stash" as an informal shortening of the word. The humor of the pun
escapes me, though.


--
Tony Cooper, Orlando FL

Peter Duncanson [BrE]

unread,
Dec 26, 2012, 5:53:35 AM12/26/12
to
On Tue, 25 Dec 2012 08:49:53 -0500, "Don Phillipson"
<e9...@SPAMBLOCK.ncf.ca> wrote:

>"hhgygy" <hhg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>news:d88c8279-d35b-47e4...@googlegroups.com...
>
>> . . . I found this pun "stashing through the snow" and I see that it has
>> something to do with moustache. Can you enlighten me upon this, please?
>
>This pun succeeds only in N.America, where the abbreviation stash for
>moustache was recently adopted by print media. (I think it had something
>to do with charitable fund-raising for prostate cancer research.)

Ah. So it has nothing to do with inhaling cocains, "snow", with the
moustache getting in the way?

> The pun
>would not work in Britain, where the 19th century abbreviation tash for
>moustache is still current.
>
>(But it is extremely feeble wordplay, which most language mavens would
>disdain.)

--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)

Peter Brooks

unread,
Dec 26, 2012, 6:10:38 AM12/26/12
to
On Dec 26, 12:53 pm, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]" <m...@peterduncanson.net>
wrote:
> On Tue, 25 Dec 2012 08:49:53 -0500, "Don Phillipson"
>
> <e...@SPAMBLOCK.ncf.ca> wrote:
> >"hhgygy" <hhg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
> >news:d88c8279-d35b-47e4...@googlegroups.com...
>
> >>  . . . I found this pun "stashing through the snow" and I see that it has
> >>  something to do with moustache. Can you enlighten me upon this, please?
>
> >This pun succeeds only in N.America, where the abbreviation stash for
> >moustache was recently adopted by print media.   (I think it had something
> >to do with charitable fund-raising for prostate cancer research.)
>
> Ah. So it has nothing to do with inhaling cocains, "snow", with the
> moustache getting in the way?
>
No, I don't think so. That's more obvious in Mr. Zappa's song:

"
You sniffed the reeking buns of angels (The story of a demented bread-
boffer) and acted like it was cocaine
"

That took me a little while to decode. He means 'they were cocaine',
'buns' being plural.

I suppose that the mention of angels makes this a Christmas song too.

Steve Hayes

unread,
Dec 26, 2012, 1:05:45 PM12/26/12
to
On Wed, 26 Dec 2012 10:53:35 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
<ma...@peterduncanson.net> wrote:

>On Tue, 25 Dec 2012 08:49:53 -0500, "Don Phillipson"
><e9...@SPAMBLOCK.ncf.ca> wrote:
>
>>"hhgygy" <hhg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>>news:d88c8279-d35b-47e4...@googlegroups.com...
>>
>>> . . . I found this pun "stashing through the snow" and I see that it has
>>> something to do with moustache. Can you enlighten me upon this, please?
>>
>>This pun succeeds only in N.America, where the abbreviation stash for
>>moustache was recently adopted by print media. (I think it had something
>>to do with charitable fund-raising for prostate cancer research.)
>
>Ah. So it has nothing to do with inhaling cocains, "snow", with the
>moustache getting in the way?

But a dealer might have a stash of snow.


--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk

R H Draney

unread,
Dec 26, 2012, 3:23:42 PM12/26/12
to
Peter Brooks filted:
>
>"
>You sniffed the reeking buns of angels (The story of a demented bread-
>boffer) and acted like it was cocaine
>"
>
>That took me a little while to decode. He means 'they were cocaine',
>'buns' being plural.
>
>I suppose that the mention of angels makes this a Christmas song too.

Only if one of them was Harold....r


--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.

Peter Brooks

unread,
Dec 26, 2012, 11:38:27 PM12/26/12
to
That'd make sense. Harold from Chelsea, where the buns come from.

I think that 'Harold' is an angel surname - you have 'Gabriel Harold',
'Michael Harold' and, probably, 'Lucifer Harold'. Not that L. Harold
would have been joining the new-born king reception choir.

Peter Moylan

unread,
Dec 27, 2012, 6:17:00 AM12/27/12
to
Is this because they are children of The Father, of whom it is said
"Harold be thy name"?

--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.

Peter Brooks

unread,
Dec 27, 2012, 6:34:36 AM12/27/12
to
On Dec 27, 1:17 pm, Peter Moylan <pe...@pmoylan.org.invalid> wrote:
> On 27/12/12 15:38, Peter Brooks wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Dec 26, 10:23 pm, R H Draney <dadoc...@spamcop.net> wrote:
> >> Peter Brooks filted:
> >>> "
> >>> You sniffed the reeking buns of angels (The story of a demented bread-
> >>> boffer) and acted like it was cocaine
> >>> "
>
> >>> That took me a little while to decode. He means 'they were cocaine',
> >>> 'buns' being plural.
>
> >>> I suppose that the mention of angels makes this a Christmas song too.
>
> >> Only if one of them was Harold....r
>
> > That'd make sense. Harold from Chelsea, where the buns come from.
>
> > I think that 'Harold' is an angel surname - you have 'Gabriel Harold',
> > 'Michael Harold' and, probably, 'Lucifer Harold'. Not that L. Harold
> > would have been joining the new-born king reception choir.
>
> Is this because they are children of The Father, of whom it is said
> "Harold be thy name"?
>
That's additional evidence, but I was actually thinking of the direct
evidence found in 'Hark, the Harold angels sing'.

If there are Harold angels, it does suggest that there are also some
non-Harold angels. When Harold is busy, these other angels might be
manufactured by Jesus, Jehovah, Jaweh, Jar or produced by the Holy
Spirit (intended to be mixed with flat Holy Water, but can be taken on
the rocks).

Jah Angel Yu will be from one of these other angelic families, located
on Jamakyah for obvious reasons.
Message has been deleted

panz...@gmail.com

unread,
Nov 27, 2016, 12:22:23 PM11/27/16
to
Especially because when pronounced Staching sounds like the word Stashing which means to store something. It only works when written down and then people are more likely to think you can't spell and are only capable of conjugating nonsensical phrases.
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages