Another letter to Sis

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Tony Cooper

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Oct 10, 2001, 12:13:25 AM10/10/01
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Dear Sis...

I think I'm in trouble in this new newsgroup. I've been
notified by one of the nabobs that I'm on trial for
something. I must be being tried in absentia since I've not
been subpoenaed, sworn in, or given a chance to testify.
It's too late now, because he says "the jury is still out".
I was never given opportunity to plead my own case or mount
any kind of defense. I would have used the "Twinkie
defense", too, since it is quite topical at the moment.

It smacks of a Kangaroo Court to me. If so, the jury may be
out for months. First, they will have to decide if a
kangaroo is edible, if the meat can be made into sausage,
what presentation is proper for kangaroo meat, and what
sauces are appropriate with kangaroo. This, in turn, will
lead to sub-threads nattering on about the sauce in question
really being a sauce or not having the consistency and
texture of an acceptable sauce.

You think this is a small issue? The nattering will extend
backwards to the nature of the container the sauce comes in,
the phonetic intonations of "bottle", and the geographic
placement of the manufacturer of the label. It is old
ground, but well trodden.

Geography discussions about the United States continue to be
strange here. Someone recently placed Connecticut in the
Midwest. It's rather like Mr. Rand and Mr. McNalley on
LSD. The Brits seem more secure. You don't see them
placing Torquay in the Lake District or Moreton-in-the-Marsh
in East Anglia.

My accuser - the one that placed me on trial - had the
audacity to say that I am "no dummy". Talk about a
left-handed compliment, or damned by faint praise. No
dummy, indeed. You and I both know, Sis, that I am sharp as
a tack. Of course, we both know that a tack has two ends:
the sharp one and the flat and dull one. But, we won't
tell them that.

Evidently, AUE is an onion with layers within layers. He
alluded to some position he holds within the group. I don't
know him that well (but I have asked him to send me his CV
so I don't make any more faux pas about his background), but
in certain posts he sounds as if his position is
semi-upright with knuckles dragging. We won't tell him
that, though, since he's a delicate flower and bruises
easily.

One of the layers of the onion is that one is evidently not
supposed to twist words. Can you imagine? Life without
puns? Life without wordplay? Bleak indeed. I cannot
believe he meant it. Either that, or it was a challenge.

Even though I'm in disrepute in some circles, I've managed
to avoid some of the traps. There's a thread running on
"dental" pronunciation. I thought it was going to be one of
those routines on how dentists start asking you questions
right after they've shoved the metal clamp in your mouth
that spreads the jaws and holds the tongue down. I had some
snappy lines ready, but caught (never mind why, but I hate
that word now) on just time. It has something to do with
pronunciation. I don't know what, though. I do know that
if I start thinking about my tongue touching my teeth during
certain sounds that my system resources meter will peg out.

Basically, my new playmates are erudite enough and work well
with words. Some have not yet grasped the wonder of
paragraphing or the beauty of snippage. One of the most
interesting aspects of the group is that few - very few -
references escape any of them. That makes other things very
worthwhile indeed.


--
Tony Cooper aka: tony_co...@yahoo.com
Provider of Jots and Tittles

Matthew M. Huntbach

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Oct 10, 2001, 6:01:55 AM10/10/01
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Tony Cooper <tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Geography discussions about the United States continue to be
> strange here. Someone recently placed Connecticut in the
> Midwest. It's rather like Mr. Rand and Mr. McNalley on
> LSD. The Brits seem more secure. You don't see them
> placing Torquay in the Lake District or Moreton-in-the-Marsh
> in East Anglia.

It's "Moreton-in-Marsh". Locals to the place insist on that, though
they seem to be fighting a losing battle against your form, judging
from Google.

Matthew Huntbach

Mike Lyle

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Oct 10, 2001, 8:09:42 AM10/10/01
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On 10 Oct 2001 10:01:55 GMT, in <9q16aj$n1v$2...@beta.qmw.ac.uk>, Matthew M.


Well, is Cheltenham in the West Country? Is Pembroke in South Wales?

Mike.


Frances Kemmish

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Oct 10, 2001, 8:34:48 AM10/10/01
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No

>Is Pembroke in South Wales?
>

I don't know.

Ask me another.

Fran

felix

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Oct 10, 2001, 9:12:24 AM10/10/01
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"Matthew M. Huntbach" <m...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk> wrote in message news:<9q16aj$n1v$2...@beta.qmw.ac.uk>...


> It's "Moreton-in-Marsh". Locals to the place insist on that, though
> they seem to be fighting a losing battle against your form, judging
> from Google.

And what an enormous car park!

But the pubs aren't as good as the one in Bourton-on-the-Hill.

felix

R H Draney

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Oct 10, 2001, 12:00:38 PM10/10/01
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On Wed, 10 Oct 2001 00:13:25 -0400, Tony Cooper
<tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Dear Sis...


>
>Geography discussions about the United States continue to be
>strange here. Someone recently placed Connecticut in the
>Midwest. It's rather like Mr. Rand and Mr. McNalley on
>LSD.

McNalley doesn't make maps, he makes beer...ignore the spelling of the
tag name (which mirrors the *correct* spelling of Mr Rand's partner);
it seems to be one of those eight-letter-limit things:

http://www.bigrockbeer.com/03brands/03beers.html#mcnallys

>Evidently, AUE is an onion with layers within layers.

Unstated: that there's nothing in the center....r

--
"Aaaahhhh!!!! Sugarplums!!!! Get 'em offa me!!!! AAAAAHHHH!!!!"

R H Draney

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Oct 10, 2001, 12:21:59 PM10/10/01
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On Wed, 10 Oct 2001 16:00:38 GMT, dado...@earthlink.net (R H Draney)
wrote:

>McNalley doesn't make maps, he makes beer...ignore the spelling of the
>tag name (which mirrors the *correct* spelling of Mr Rand's partner);
>it seems to be one of those eight-letter-limit things:
>
> http://www.bigrockbeer.com/03brands/03beers.html#mcnallys

Damn....

Once the graphic of the label finished loading, I see that Big Rock
Beer doesn't have a consistent spelling for the product...the index
page says McNalley's, the label itself says McNally's....

They've also got a flavor called "Köld"...am I supposed to pronounce
this (non-rhotically) "curled"?...(I never *did* manage to deal with
umlauted N a la "Spinal Tap")....r
--
"Those cracks in the sidewalk, they look like an outline of the west coast of Mexico. Those cracks in the sidewalk, they are the west coast of Mexico.
Those ants in the middle, they are eating the Yucatan. Someone has stepped in Panama. They have left smudges in the Pacific."
--ly...@pharmdec.wustl.edu

Skitt

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Oct 10, 2001, 4:53:12 PM10/10/01
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"Frances Kemmish" <fkem...@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:3BC44068...@optonline.net...

You must answer the next question correctly to remain in the game.
--
Skitt (in SF Bay Area) http://www.geocities.com/opus731/
I speak English well -- I learn it from a book!
-- Manuel of "Fawlty Towers" (he's from Barcelona).


Tony Cooper

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Oct 10, 2001, 6:48:12 PM10/10/01
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The Frommer guide books include the "in". They also have
Bourton-on-the-water, Stow-on-the-Wold. but
Stratford-on-Avon and Henley-on-Thames. I will defer to the
locals if it becomes an issue with them.

Charles Riggs

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Oct 11, 2001, 2:51:05 AM10/11/01
to
On Wed, 10 Oct 2001 13:53:12 -0700, "Skitt" <sk...@earthlink.net>
wrote:

>
>"Frances Kemmish" <fkem...@optonline.net> wrote in message

>> Ask me another.


>
>You must answer the next question correctly to remain in the game.

Are you implying that Fran is The Weakest Link?

Charles Riggs

Skitt

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Oct 11, 2001, 12:08:39 PM10/11/01
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"Charles Riggs" <chr...@gofree.indigo.ie> wrote in message
news:lmeast8v4mqqa79t6...@4ax.com...

I would never do that.

M. Price

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Oct 11, 2001, 6:27:15 PM10/11/01
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In article <aUWw7.22890$ev2....@www.newsranger.com>,

Of course not. Wales stops at Whitland. And anything north of the
Cleddau is "over the water," or even "abroad." As in "Local boy? No,
he's from abroad. Over by Neyland."

--
Merrall Llewelyn Price Department of English
University of Rochester mp...@troi.cc.rochester.edu

Charles Riggs

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Oct 12, 2001, 1:07:11 AM10/12/01
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On Thu, 11 Oct 2001 09:08:39 -0700, "Skitt" <sk...@earthlink.net>
wrote:

>
>"Charles Riggs" <chr...@gofree.indigo.ie> wrote in message
>news:lmeast8v4mqqa79t6...@4ax.com...
>> On Wed, 10 Oct 2001 13:53:12 -0700, "Skitt" <sk...@earthlink.net>
>> wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >"Frances Kemmish" <fkem...@optonline.net> wrote in message
>>
>> >> Ask me another.
>> >
>> >You must answer the next question correctly to remain in the game.
>>
>> Are you implying that Fran is The Weakest Link?
>
>I would never do that.

But what if three people remained and she was the weakest link in the
preceding round? Would you vote off the strongest contestant so you'd
have an advantage in the playoff? Anne would most definitely and
vocally object.

Charles Riggs

Frances Kemmish

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Oct 12, 2001, 4:46:50 AM10/12/01
to

The question wouldn't arise because I wouldn't be involved in the
competition in the first place. I was making a reference to a much
older quiz-style contest which was on the radio when I was a slip of a
girl. I can't remember what it was called.

Fran

Skitt

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Oct 12, 2001, 1:51:12 PM10/12/01
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"Charles Riggs" <chr...@gofree.indigo.ie> wrote in message
news:b4ucstcepovjihloh...@4ax.com...

Ask me again if and when that actually happens. (It won't.)

Gene Wirchenko

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Oct 13, 2001, 12:32:43 AM10/13/01
to
Tony Cooper <tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Dear Sis...
>
>I think I'm in trouble in this new newsgroup. I've been

[snip]

>Even though I'm in disrepute in some circles, I've managed
>to avoid some of the traps. There's a thread running on
>"dental" pronunciation. I thought it was going to be one of
>those routines on how dentists start asking you questions
>right after they've shoved the metal clamp in your mouth
>that spreads the jaws and holds the tongue down. I had some
>snappy lines ready, but caught (never mind why, but I hate
>that word now) on just time. It has something to do with
>pronunciation. I don't know what, though. I do know that
>if I start thinking about my tongue touching my teeth during
>certain sounds that my system resources meter will peg out.

Oh, yes, and there's a thread about what to call a dentist. I
don't know if it has anything to do with the kangaroo meat.

[snip]

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko

Computerese Irregular Verb Conjugation:
I have preferences.
You have biases.
He/She has prejudices.

Skitt

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Oct 13, 2001, 12:58:09 AM10/13/01
to

"Gene Wirchenko" <ge...@mail.ocis.net> wrote in message
news:3bc7b51e...@news.ocis.net...

> Tony Cooper <tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> >Dear Sis...
> >
> >I think I'm in trouble in this new newsgroup. I've been
>
> [snip]
>
> >Even though I'm in disrepute in some circles, I've managed
> >to avoid some of the traps. There's a thread running on
> >"dental" pronunciation. I thought it was going to be one of
> >those routines on how dentists start asking you questions
> >right after they've shoved the metal clamp in your mouth
> >that spreads the jaws and holds the tongue down. I had some
> >snappy lines ready, but caught (never mind why, but I hate
> >that word now) on just time. It has something to do with
> >pronunciation. I don't know what, though. I do know that
> >if I start thinking about my tongue touching my teeth during
> >certain sounds that my system resources meter will peg out.
>
> Oh, yes, and there's a thread about what to call a dentist. I
> don't know if it has anything to do with the kangaroo meat.
>
> [snip]

Aha! "Braking News" --

Just a few hours ago, at the southern end of Hayward, yours truly was caused
to submit to a dentist's (of a mere three months experience) poking his
tools under the gums, scraping, dislodging, drawing blood, and generally
annoying this reporter with such terrorism. While it was suggested that an
anesthetic might be of assistance to bear the pain of such intrusion, I, in
true patriotic fashion, bearing true allegiance to my teeth, refused any
such drugging to make me insensitive to the goings-on. Hey, I can stick up
for my teeth without requesting to go numb.

It didn't hurt much, but let's say, it wasn't enjoyable. Same with other
happenings around me today.

Charles Riggs

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Oct 13, 2001, 4:07:22 AM10/13/01
to
On Fri, 12 Oct 2001 04:46:50 -0400, Frances Kemmish
<fkem...@optonline.net> wrote:

>Charles Riggs wrote:
>>
>> On Thu, 11 Oct 2001 09:08:39 -0700, "Skitt" <sk...@earthlink.net>
>> wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >"Charles Riggs" <chr...@gofree.indigo.ie> wrote in message
>> >news:lmeast8v4mqqa79t6...@4ax.com...
>> >> On Wed, 10 Oct 2001 13:53:12 -0700, "Skitt" <sk...@earthlink.net>
>> >> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> >
>> >> >"Frances Kemmish" <fkem...@optonline.net> wrote in message
>> >>
>> >> >> Ask me another.
>> >> >
>> >> >You must answer the next question correctly to remain in the game.
>> >>
>> >> Are you implying that Fran is The Weakest Link?
>> >
>> >I would never do that.
>>
>> But what if three people remained and she was the weakest link in the
>> preceding round? Would you vote off the strongest contestant so you'd
>> have an advantage in the playoff? Anne would most definitely and
>> vocally object.
>>
>
>The question wouldn't arise because I wouldn't be involved in the
>competition in the first place.

I don't know if they accept Americans on the English show, but I'd
love to be on it, and I could use the money for a new computer.

> I was making a reference to a much
>older quiz-style contest which was on the radio when I was a slip of a
>girl. I can't remember what it was called.

I think I would have said, "when I was just a slip of a girl". Isn't
that the way the idiom goes?

Charlene Riggs

R H Draney

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Oct 13, 2001, 10:17:30 AM10/13/01
to

I'm pretty sure the idiom requires a "*mere* slip"....

When referring to the long-past era when music was on *both* sides of
the disc, and "dialling" a telephone actually described the action
involved, I've lately taken to prefacing observations with "back in
the late Pleistocene"....r

Frances Kemmish

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Oct 13, 2001, 10:27:52 AM10/13/01
to
R H Draney wrote:
>
> On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 09:07:22 +0100, Charles Riggs
> <chr...@gofree.indigo.ie> wrote:
>
> >On Fri, 12 Oct 2001 04:46:50 -0400, Frances Kemmish
> ><fkem...@optonline.net> wrote:
> >
> >> I was making a reference to a much
> >>older quiz-style contest which was on the radio when I was a slip of a
> >>girl. I can't remember what it was called.
> >
> >I think I would have said, "when I was just a slip of a girl". Isn't
> >that the way the idiom goes?
>
> I'm pretty sure the idiom requires a "*mere* slip"....
>

The idiom doesn't require either "just" or "mere", although you can
add those words if you like.

> When referring to the long-past era when music was on *both* sides of
> the disc, and "dialling" a telephone actually described the action
> involved, I've lately taken to prefacing observations with "back in
> the late Pleistocene"....r

At our house, reference is made to "...when dinosaurs roamed the
earth..."

Fran

R H Draney

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Oct 13, 2001, 12:26:10 PM10/13/01
to
On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 10:27:52 -0400, Frances Kemmish
<fkem...@optonline.net> wrote:

>R H Draney wrote:
>>
>> On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 09:07:22 +0100, Charles Riggs
>> <chr...@gofree.indigo.ie> wrote:
>>
>> >I think I would have said, "when I was just a slip of a girl". Isn't
>> >that the way the idiom goes?
>>
>> I'm pretty sure the idiom requires a "*mere* slip"....
>
>The idiom doesn't require either "just" or "mere", although you can
>add those words if you like.

Oh, I like all right...using the canned phrase is the only way to
ensure that "slip of a girl" isn't interpreted as "a girl's slip"....

>> When referring to the long-past era when music was on *both* sides of
>> the disc, and "dialling" a telephone actually described the action
>> involved, I've lately taken to prefacing observations with "back in
>> the late Pleistocene"....r
>
>At our house, reference is made to "...when dinosaurs roamed the
>earth..."

Again, custom rears its head...we always say (a la Paul Frees
narrating the Disney train ride) "when fearsome lizards roamed the
earth"....

Another phrase that's found its way into our family's lexicon, much to
the bewilderment of casual observers, is Baldrick's "I have a cunning
plan" from the Blackadder series...it comes in handy e.g. just before
executing a non-intuitive parking maneuver....r

a1a5...@sprint.ca

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Oct 13, 2001, 5:04:05 PM10/13/01
to
On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 14:17:30 GMT, dado...@earthlink.net (R H Draney)
wrote:

>On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 09:07:22 +0100, Charles Riggs


><chr...@gofree.indigo.ie> wrote:
>
>>On Fri, 12 Oct 2001 04:46:50 -0400, Frances Kemmish
>><fkem...@optonline.net> wrote:
>>
>>> I was making a reference to a much
>>>older quiz-style contest which was on the radio when I was a slip of a
>>>girl. I can't remember what it was called.
>>
>>I think I would have said, "when I was just a slip of a girl". Isn't
>>that the way the idiom goes?
>
>I'm pretty sure the idiom requires a "*mere* slip"....
>

Right. Unqualified it is even more disrespectful of one's parents.

>When referring to the long-past era when music was on *both* sides of
>the disc, and "dialling" a telephone actually described the action
>involved, I've lately taken to prefacing observations with "back in
>the late Pleistocene"....r

You'll have the lads asking how you pronounce that, and we'll have
another hilarious session with the NG's norn iron expert on RP.

Linz

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Oct 13, 2001, 7:52:17 PM10/13/01
to
On Wed, 10 Oct 2001 18:48:12 -0400, Tony Cooper wrote:

> "Matthew M. Huntbach" wrote:
> >
> > Tony Cooper <tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:

(snip)

> > > You don't see them
> > > placing Torquay in the Lake District or Moreton-in-the-Marsh
> > > in East Anglia.
> >
> > It's "Moreton-in-Marsh". Locals to the place insist on that, though
> > they seem to be fighting a losing battle against your form, judging
> > from Google.
>
> The Frommer guide books include the "in". They also have
> Bourton-on-the-water, Stow-on-the-Wold. but
> Stratford-on-Avon and Henley-on-Thames. I will defer to the
> locals if it becomes an issue with them.

Everyone includes the 'in'. It's the 'the' that's in question.
--
I'm all heart, me.
This makes tying shoelaces more than a little tricky.
(Ancipital, urs)

Frances Kemmish

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Oct 14, 2001, 12:43:44 AM10/14/01
to
R H Draney wrote:
>
> On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 10:27:52 -0400, Frances Kemmish
> <fkem...@optonline.net> wrote:
>
> >R H Draney wrote:
> >>
> >> On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 09:07:22 +0100, Charles Riggs
> >> <chr...@gofree.indigo.ie> wrote:
> >>
> >> >I think I would have said, "when I was just a slip of a girl". Isn't
> >> >that the way the idiom goes?
> >>
> >> I'm pretty sure the idiom requires a "*mere* slip"....
> >
> >The idiom doesn't require either "just" or "mere", although you can
> >add those words if you like.
>
> Oh, I like all right...using the canned phrase is the only way to
> ensure that "slip of a girl" isn't interpreted as "a girl's slip"....
>

Well, it's better than being thought a "girl's blouse", I suppose.

Tony Cooper

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Oct 14, 2001, 12:41:22 AM10/14/01
to
Linz wrote:
>
> On Wed, 10 Oct 2001 18:48:12 -0400, Tony Cooper wrote:
>
> > "Matthew M. Huntbach" wrote:
> > >
> > > Tony Cooper <tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> (snip)
>
> > > > You don't see them
> > > > placing Torquay in the Lake District or Moreton-in-the-Marsh
> > > > in East Anglia.
> > >
> > > It's "Moreton-in-Marsh". Locals to the place insist on that, though
> > > they seem to be fighting a losing battle against your form, judging
> > > from Google.
> >
> > The Frommer guide books include the "in". They also have
> > Bourton-on-the-water, Stow-on-the-Wold. but
> > Stratford-on-Avon and Henley-on-Thames. I will defer to the
> > locals if it becomes an issue with them.
>
> Everyone includes the 'in'. It's the 'the' that's in question.

My error in typing the above. I meant to say Frommer shows
"in-the". I don't say it's right; merely that it's what
Frommer printed in a guide book I happen to have on the
bookshelf from a trip.

Tony Cooper

unread,
Oct 14, 2001, 2:24:52 AM10/14/01
to
Tony Cooper wrote:
>
> My error in typing the above. I meant to say Frommer shows
> "in-the". I don't say it's right; merely that it's what
> Frommer printed in a guide book I happen to have on the
> bookshelf from a trip.
>
Where did you go on your trip that you brought the bookshelf
back?

There. Saved you the trouble. You're welcome.

R H Draney

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Oct 14, 2001, 3:56:06 AM10/14/01
to
On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 21:04:05 GMT, a1a5...@sprint.ca wrote:

>On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 14:17:30 GMT, dado...@earthlink.net (R H Draney)
>wrote:
>

>>When referring to the long-past era when music was on *both* sides of
>>the disc, and "dialling" a telephone actually described the action
>>involved, I've lately taken to prefacing observations with "back in
>>the late Pleistocene"....r
>
>You'll have the lads asking how you pronounce that, and we'll have
>another hilarious session with the NG's norn iron expert on RP.

To save time, I declare that I pronounce it /'plAI st@ sin/...others
can pronounce it "Debbie" for all I care....r

Charles Riggs

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Oct 14, 2001, 4:15:07 AM10/14/01
to
On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 10:27:52 -0400, Frances Kemmish
<fkem...@optonline.net> wrote:

>R H Draney wrote:
>>
>> On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 09:07:22 +0100, Charles Riggs
>> <chr...@gofree.indigo.ie> wrote:
>>
>> >On Fri, 12 Oct 2001 04:46:50 -0400, Frances Kemmish
>> ><fkem...@optonline.net> wrote:
>> >
>> >> I was making a reference to a much
>> >>older quiz-style contest which was on the radio when I was a slip of a
>> >>girl. I can't remember what it was called.
>> >
>> >I think I would have said, "when I was just a slip of a girl". Isn't
>> >that the way the idiom goes?
>>
>> I'm pretty sure the idiom requires a "*mere* slip"....
>>
>
>The idiom doesn't require either "just" or "mere", although you can
>add those words if you like.

It needs something all right. On further reflection, I think "mere"
does the job best.

Charles Riggs

Rowan Dingle

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Oct 14, 2001, 7:33:18 AM10/14/01
to
In alt.usage.english, Frances Kemmish <fkem...@optonline.net> wrote:
>R H Draney wrote:
>> On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 10:27:52 -0400, Frances Kemmish
>> >R H Draney wrote:
>> >> On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 09:07:22 +0100, Charles Riggs

>> >> >I think I would have said, "when I was just a slip of a girl". Isn't


>> >> >that the way the idiom goes?
>> >>
>> >> I'm pretty sure the idiom requires a "*mere* slip"....
>> >
>> >The idiom doesn't require either "just" or "mere", although you can
>> >add those words if you like.
>>
>> Oh, I like all right...using the canned phrase is the only way to
>> ensure that "slip of a girl" isn't interpreted as "a girl's slip"....
>
>Well, it's better than being thought a "girl's blouse", I suppose.

I've only encountered that as 'big girl's blouse'. I've never been clear
whether it is the blouse or the girl that is big. (In my opinion, it is
not safe to assume that if the girl is big then the blouse is big, and
vice versa.)

It means the same as 'wet' but 'wet' cannot be used as an intensifier:
calling someone a 'big girl's wet blouse' would not register as an
insult, rather it would generally provoke a few moments of quiet
contemplation.

--
Rowan Dingle

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