"Blog" as a transitive verb: improper usage?

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ldw

no leída,
3 mar 2004 2:14:213/3/04
a
The subject line says it all. Well, not really -- it doesn't include
the part about how annoyed I am with this phenomenon, which has been
popping up online with increasing frequency.

Examples:

"Yesterday I blogged the Kerry primary results."

"Tomorrow I will be blogging the nanotechnology conference live from
Stanford."

"Joe Smith blogged me yesterday, and I'm so grateful for the
attention!"

I can accept "blog" as a noun. It's a nifty word that serves a
legitimate purpose. I can even accept "blog" as an intransitive verb
("Golly, I just spent my whole afternoon blogging").

But as a transitive verb with a direct object? There's something about
"blogging the nanotechnology conference" that just doesn't ring right.
I can't quite put my finger on it, but it's there. Maybe it's the
misuse of the transitive sense, which entails a subject doing
something TO a direct object. And because "blogging the conference"
doesn't actually do anything TO the conference, it seems an improper
usage.

Blog all you want ABOUT the conference. Blog all you want ABOUT the
voting results. Be grateful that Joe Smith blogged ABOUT you
yesterday. But please don't BLOG anything. It's just not right.

Thoughts and threats are welcome.

CMc

CyberCypher

no leída,
3 mar 2004 5:05:463/3/04
a

Spend 20 minutes inhaling as quickly as you can while concomitantly
emptying your mind of all activity save the involuntary cerebral
farts your apoptotic neurons cannot help emitting. Repeat "Om" as
often as possible. If this doesn't help, take two buffered aspirin
and blog everything in your next post.

--
Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.

Lars Eighner

no leída,
3 mar 2004 6:16:073/3/04
a
In our last episode,
<bb04f998.04030...@posting.google.com>, the lovely and
talented ldw broadcast on alt.usage.english:

> I can accept "blog" as a noun. It's a nifty word that serves a
> legitimate purpose. I can even accept "blog" as an intransitive verb
> ("Golly, I just spent my whole afternoon blogging").

> But as a transitive verb with a direct object? There's something about
> "blogging the nanotechnology conference" that just doesn't ring right.
> I can't quite put my finger on it, but it's there. Maybe it's the
> misuse of the transitive sense, which entails a subject doing
> something TO a direct object. And because "blogging the conference"
> doesn't actually do anything TO the conference, it seems an improper
> usage.

> Blog all you want ABOUT the conference. Blog all you want ABOUT the
> voting results. Be grateful that Joe Smith blogged ABOUT you
> yesterday. But please don't BLOG anything. It's just not right.

Blog is much too young a word for anything about it to be set in
stone. But as it is derived from "log" and log has long been used
as a transitive verb, I don't find much merit in your complaint.
Logging the temperature does not actually do anything to the temperature
(quantum physics aside), so why not "blogging the conference"?

--
Lars Eighner -finger for geek code- eig...@io.com http://www.io.com/~eighner/
Nothing endures but change. --Heraclitus

Donna Richoux

no leída,
3 mar 2004 7:10:413/3/04
a
ldw <lesl...@hotmail.com> wrote:

Trying to nip something in bud, eh? Gooooood luck.


>
> Thoughts and threats are welcome.

Drawing from your examples, would you agree that the word means "to post
the information at one's blog site"?

Wouldn't that make it more like "display" or any number of other verbs
that can take a direct object without altering them in any meaningful
way?

I saw the results.
I found the results.
I displayed the results.
I posted the results.
I announced the results.
I considered the results.
I recorded the results.
(I blogged the results - ?)

--
Curious -- Donna Richoux


Steve Hayes

no leída,
4 mar 2004 0:38:204/3/04
a
On 2 Mar 2004 23:14:21 -0800, lesl...@hotmail.com (ldw) wrote:

>But as a transitive verb with a direct object? There's something about
>"blogging the nanotechnology conference" that just doesn't ring right.
>I can't quite put my finger on it, but it's there. Maybe it's the
>misuse of the transitive sense, which entails a subject doing
>something TO a direct object. And because "blogging the conference"
>doesn't actually do anything TO the conference, it seems an improper
>usage.

What's your take on "diarise"?


--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk

Maria Conlon

no leída,
4 mar 2004 17:05:204/3/04
a
Steve Hayes wrote:
> On 2 Mar 2004 23:14:21 -0800, lesl...@hotmail.com (ldw) wrote:
>
>> But as a transitive verb with a direct object? There's something
>> about "blogging the nanotechnology conference" that just doesn't
>> ring right. I can't quite put my finger on it, but it's there. Maybe
>> it's the misuse of the transitive sense, which entails a subject
>> doing something TO a direct object. And because "blogging the
>> conference" doesn't actually do anything TO the conference, it seems
>> an improper usage.
>
> What's your take on "diarise"?

It looks like an abbreviated (one dot?) form of diaeresis.

Seriously, and even though I'm not the poster you were addressing,
"blogging the conference" doesn't sound right to me, either. Nor would I
use "diarise" ("diarize" here in the U.S., I imagine, if it's used here
at all). I personally haven't yet used the verbed form of "diary," if
that is what you mean, and probably won't.

But I can see that I might end up verbing "blog" in the fashion quoted.
It's a new term, a web-related term (web log) and a term more likely
than some others to find favor among the masses, which includes yours
truly.

Now that I have the time, becoming a blogger has its appeal. But it
seems to require more -- and more informed -- opinions than I have.
There are many people in aue, though, who could do the job admirably, I
think.

--
Maria Conlon
Please send any email to the Hot Mail address.


Steve Hayes

no leída,
5 mar 2004 0:04:315/3/04
a
On Thu, 4 Mar 2004 17:05:20 -0500, "Maria Conlon" <mariaco...@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>Steve Hayes wrote:
>> On 2 Mar 2004 23:14:21 -0800, lesl...@hotmail.com (ldw) wrote:
>>
>>> But as a transitive verb with a direct object? There's something
>>> about "blogging the nanotechnology conference" that just doesn't
>>> ring right. I can't quite put my finger on it, but it's there. Maybe
>>> it's the misuse of the transitive sense, which entails a subject
>>> doing something TO a direct object. And because "blogging the
>>> conference" doesn't actually do anything TO the conference, it seems
>>> an improper usage.
>>
>> What's your take on "diarise"?
>
>It looks like an abbreviated (one dot?) form of diaeresis.
>
>Seriously, and even though I'm not the poster you were addressing,
>"blogging the conference" doesn't sound right to me, either. Nor would I
>use "diarise" ("diarize" here in the U.S., I imagine, if it's used here
>at all). I personally haven't yet used the verbed form of "diary," if
>that is what you mean, and probably won't.

Lots of people do, though. It means to make an entry in one's (appointment)
diary.

>But I can see that I might end up verbing "blog" in the fashion quoted.
>It's a new term, a web-related term (web log) and a term more likely
>than some others to find favor among the masses, which includes yours
>truly.

"Blog" is an abeciation for "weg blog", and I've seen "log" used transitively
to mean to make an entry about something in a log book.

>Now that I have the time, becoming a blogger has its appeal. But it
>seems to require more -- and more informed -- opinions than I have.
>There are many people in aue, though, who could do the job admirably, I
>think.

Check http://www.livejournal.com/

if you ever decide to do so.

Apurbva Chandra Senray

no leída,
5 mar 2004 13:30:175/3/04
a
haye...@hotmail.com (Steve Hayes) wrote in message news:<404803ff....@news.saix.net>...

> On Thu, 4 Mar 2004 17:05:20 -0500, "Maria Conlon" <mariaco...@hotmail.com>
> wrote:

> >Seriously, and even though I'm not the poster you were addressing,
> >"blogging the conference" doesn't sound right to me, either. Nor would I
> >use "diarise" ("diarize" here in the U.S., I imagine, if it's used here
> >at all). I personally haven't yet used the verbed form of "diary," if
> >that is what you mean, and probably won't.
>
> Lots of people do, though. It means to make an entry in one's (appointment)
> diary.

Ah, that would explain it. Here in the U.S., we don't have
appointment diaries. We have schedules, calendars, or date books. A
diary is where pre-adolescent girls write about how dreamy Todd is and
how mean Suzy is.

Eric Schwartz

no leída,
5 mar 2004 14:17:355/3/04
a
acse...@yahoo.com (Apurbva Chandra Senray) writes:
> Ah, that would explain it. Here in the U.S., we don't have
> appointment diaries. We have schedules, calendars, or date books.

Don't forget day planners and PDAs.

> A diary is where pre-adolescent girls write about how dreamy Todd is
> and how mean Suzy is.

Diaries also tend to be short-lived efforts; in "The Innocents Abroad",
Mark Twain wrote:

If you wish to inflict a heartless and malignant punishment upon a
young person, pledge him to keep a journal a year.

-=Eric
--
Come to think of it, there are already a million monkeys on a million
typewriters, and Usenet is NOTHING like Shakespeare.
-- Blair Houghton.

Pierre Jelenc

no leída,
6 mar 2004 12:40:286/3/04
a
ldw <lesl...@hotmail.com> writes:
> The subject line says it all. Well, not really -- it doesn't include
> the part about how annoyed I am with this phenomenon, which has been
> popping up online with increasing frequency.

The T-shirt says you're wrong:

http://www.thinkgeek.com/interests/oreilly/tshirts/5eb7/

Pierre


--
Pierre Jelenc | New on Home Office Records: Ethan Lipton
| www.homeofficerecords.com www.ethanlipton.com
The Gigometer | Pepper Of The Earth: the HO blog
www.gigometer.com | www.homeofficerecords.com/blog

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