What is the third word?

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Sam Semen

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May 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/6/96
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Some friends of mine asked me the following question. For the life of me,
I haven't been able to figure out the third word. Does anyone know the
third word? Here's the question:

There are three words in the english language that end in "gry". Two of
the words are hungry and angry. What is the third word?

Roy Lakin

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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In article <4mm3df$5...@newsbf02.news.aol.com>,
Sam Semen <sams...@aol.com> wrote:

[...]

(yawn)

three

Daan Sandee

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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You get 10 demerits for not reading before posting.
You get 10 demerits for not reading the FAQ.
Now go away, and if you should meet those "friends" again, please punch
them on the nose for me.

AOLers. It gets boring to sneer at AOLers, but with his choice of handle
he shouldn't expect anything else.

Daan Sandee san...@think.com
Burlington, MA

Markus Laker

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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sams...@aol.com (Sam Semen) wrote:

> There are three words in the english language that end in "gry". Two of
> the words are hungry and angry. What is the third word?

May I make a suggestion? Pop over to alt.sysadmin.recovery, tell them
you're an 3l33t hac/<er d00d and ask whether they have any k00l warez c1tez.
You'll get a warmer reception. Alternatively, look at these threads --

Words ending in 'gry'
Origins of GRY postings
*gry
-gry words: gry, puggry, aggry beads, meagry, etc.
*gry & meanings that need words

-- and consider whether, by reading the newsgroup before posting, you might
have made yourself a little less unpopular. It's not entirely your fault,
but we are fed up to the back teeth with people asking the same question
time and time again.

Okay?

[Mailed and posted. Oh look, you're on AOL]


--
Markus Laker.


Billy D'Augustine

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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Daan Sandee wrote:
>
> You get 10 demerits for not reading before posting.

I would happen to agree. What ever happened to the good old practice of
lurking in a newsgroup before posting? I lurked here for about a year
before I posted.

> AOLers. It gets boring to sneer at AOLers, but with his choice of handle
> he shouldn't expect anything else.

Actually, anymore, it's not just AOL, but any number of those huge online
services. "You can point-and-click your way across the Internet" is AOL's
line that makes me taste bile... Nobody understands Netiquitte anymore, and
nobody is willing to learn.

--
Billy D'Augustine
az...@worldnet.att.net

Geoff Butler

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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In article <4mm3df$5...@newsbf02.news.aol.com>
sams...@aol.com "Sam Semen" writes:

> Some friends of mine asked me the following question. For the life of me,
> I haven't been able to figure out the third word. Does anyone know the
> third word? Here's the question:
>

> There are three words in the english language that end in "gry". Two of
> the words are hungry and angry. What is the third word?

Yes, we know the third word, and the fourth, and the fifth, as
would you if you'd made the effort to look. Here's a question
for you: who told you to ask in a.u.e?

Geoff Butler

thi...@usa.pipeline.com

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
to

In article <4mm3df$5...@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, Sam Semen writes:

>Some friends of mine asked me the following question. For the life of me,

>I haven't been able to figure out the third word. Does anyone know the
>third word? Here's the question:
>
>There are three words in the english language that end in "gry". Two of
>the words are hungry and angry. What is the third word?
>

Dear God, can't anyone drive a stake through this so-called riddle's heart?
There are, in fact, umpteen words ending in "gry," all of them variant
spellings of other words -- which is why they're hard to find in a
dictionary. The word you're supposed to come up with is "anhungry."
Remember when they were telling you the riddle, and they said something
about already having told you what the word is? Well, they did -- in a
pig's eye. "Angry," and "hungry," which they take to be the same as
"anhungry...."

Oh, I get it, everybody says -- but there's nothing to get.


Richard Badger

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May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
to sams...@aol.com

sams...@aol.com (Sam Semen) wrote:
>Some friends of mine asked me the following question. For the life of me,
>I haven't been able to figure out the third word. Does anyone know the
>third word? Here's the question:
>
>There are three words in the english language that end in "gry". Two of
>the words are hungry and angry. What is the third word?

As many people have no doubt already told you, this probably started
off as a trick question. The third word is the third word in the sentence
beginning 'there are three words' and so the third word is 'three'.
Alternatively you can always say the third word is 'gry', which
apparently is a word in English but is not in any of my dictionaries.


Rich Veraa

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May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
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In article <4mocnr$t...@news1.t1.usa.pipeline.com>,
thi...@usa.pipeline.com wrote:

>>There are three words in the english language that end in "gry". Two of
>>the words are hungry and angry. What is the third word?

>Dear God, can't anyone drive a stake through this so-called riddle's heart?


>There are, in fact, umpteen words ending in "gry," all of them variant
>spellings of other words --

Actually, the original version of that puzzle -- before some scholarly type
discovered that there really are other words ending in "gry" -- was a trick
question, as all puzzles should be: It went like this:


Think of words ending in 'gry'. Angry and hungry are two of them.
There are only three words in the English language. What is the
third word? The word is something that everyone uses everyday.
If you have listened carefully, I have already told you what it is.

Now. ignore the first line, which is a red herring.

The answer, of course, is 'language'. (the first two words being
'the' and 'english'.)


Cheers,
Rich

Have you kissed your parrot today? 0
rve...@netside.net rve...@newssun.med.miami.edu ///{|}\\\
http://www.netside.net/~rveraa FIDONET (1:135/907) /|\
GE/L/FA H+>+++ g+ w+ v+@ C+++ OS/2 Y++ b+++ e+++ u** r++(---)>+++ y+>+++

Geoff Butler

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May 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/10/96
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In article <4mocnr$t...@news1.t1.usa.pipeline.com>
thi...@usa.pipeline.com writes:

> Dear God, can't anyone drive a stake through this so-called riddle's heart?
> There are, in fact, umpteen words ending in "gry," all of them variant

> spellings of other words -- which is why they're hard to find in a
> dictionary. The word you're supposed to come up with is "anhungry."
> Remember when they were telling you the riddle, and they said something
> about already having told you what the word is? Well, they did -- in a
> pig's eye. "Angry," and "hungry," which they take to be the same as
> "anhungry...."

Hmmm. I didn't interpret it that way. I took it to mean that the
required answer is 'gry', because that does appear in the riddle.
Of course, the required answer may have been 'language', but the
thing has been rephrased so often that it's no longer an option.

I agree with the bit about the stake, though.

Geoff Butler

Robert Gurfinkel

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May 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/12/96
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Think of words ending in 'gry'. Angry and hungry are two of them.
There are only three words in the English language. What is the
third word? The word is something that everyone uses everyday.
If you have listened carefully, I have already told you what it is.
Now. ignore the first line, which is a red herring.
The answer, of course, is 'language'. (the first two words being
'the' and 'english'.)

---------Comment: The statement "There are only three words in the
English language" is patently false. I can think of maybe four or five,
at least.
The only way such a statement, if spoken, can be accepted as valid is
by the tacit understanding that "the English language" is in
quotations. In such a case, a person well trained in logic can easily
solve the puzzle.
If the puzzle is written, as in this case, it is in bad taste, rude, in
bad grammar, and thoroughly deceitful, not to include the quotation
marks.
A written puzzle that relies on dishonesty loses, at least for me, all
its charm.
And by the way, what is that third word that ends in "gry"?
Bob Gurfinkel

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