=SDC= Q12: First Name Fred

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Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 18, 2011, 5:54:27 AM8/18/11
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In the poem where "wood" means "mad", what word means "wood"?

--
VB

Harrison Hill

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Aug 18, 2011, 10:27:38 AM8/18/11
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On Aug 18, 10:54 am, Vinny Burgoo <hlu...@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
> In the poem where "wood" means "mad", what word means "wood"?

"Wood" is a common word for "mad" in Middle English it seems, so there
must be many poems that fit the bill. The best part of the most famous
Middle English poem has it:

from The Millers Tale

...Up stirte hire Alison and Nicholay,
And criden "Out" and "Harrow" in the strete.
The neighebores, bothe smale and grete,
In ronnen for to gauren on this man,
That yet aswowne lay, bothe pale and wan,
For with the fal he brosten hadde his arm.
But stonde he moste unto his owene harm;
For whan he spak, he was anon bore doun
With hende Nicholas and Alisoun.
They tolden every man that he was wood, <---here
He was agast so of Nowelis flood
Thurgh fantasie, that of his vanytee
He hadde yboght hym knedyng-tubbes thre,
And hadde hem hanged in the roof above;
And that he preyed hem, for Goddes love,
To sitten in the roof, par compaignye.
The folk gan laughen at his fantasye; ...

Since the man tricked was a carpenter, there must be some wood
mentioned. I'll be back...

Jerry Friedman

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Aug 18, 2011, 10:34:09 AM8/18/11
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Maybe I'd better change the question to "In a poem where "wood" means
"mad", what nearby word means "wood"?

--
Jerry Friedman, T. O. Goalpostmover

James Hogg

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Aug 18, 2011, 10:54:07 AM8/18/11
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Holt

--
James

James Hogg

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Aug 18, 2011, 11:00:33 AM8/18/11
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Jerry Friedman wrote:
> Maybe I'd better change the question to "In a poem where "wood" means
> "mad", what nearby word means "wood"?

Bosk

--
James

Harrison Hill

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Aug 18, 2011, 10:52:04 AM8/18/11
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Never mind I enjoyed reading The Millers Tale again. I have always
thought that "axed" was an ignorant way of saying "asked", but it
turns out it is the old-fashioned way. I take it the answer is not
"tymber".

...I trowe that he be went
For tymber, ther oure abott hath hym sent;
For he is wont for tymber for to go...

Jerry Friedman

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Aug 18, 2011, 11:46:01 AM8/18/11
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Or an old-fashioned way.

> I take it the answer is not
> "tymber".
>
>  ...I trowe that he be went

Too bad that AFAIK "he be went" isn't quite AAVE, the way "axed" is.

>  For tymber, ther oure abott hath hym sent;
>  For he is wont for tymber for to go...

It's not, but it's a valiant effort. If you or James or someone finds
the T. O. answer, it will be easy to confirm, and it's closely
connected to the question title.

--
Jerry Friedman

Harrison Hill

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Aug 18, 2011, 12:11:50 PM8/18/11
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In my final year studying English at school we studied "The Millers
Tale" for our exams. I am still amazed at how erotic, and rude, and
funny it is. Our other text was "Romeo & Juliet" so we went to see
Olivia de Havilland (topless aged 15 years) in Franco Zeffirelli's
1968 film. Learning was never such fun!

Bob Lieblich

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Aug 18, 2011, 4:31:44 PM8/18/11
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On Aug 18, 12:11 pm, Harrison Hill <harrish...@gmx.com> wrote:

[ ... ]

> In my final year studying English at school we studied "The Millers
> Tale" for our exams. I am still amazed at how erotic, and rude, and
> funny it is. Our other text was "Romeo & Juliet" so we went to see
> Olivia de Havilland (topless aged 15 years) in Franco Zeffirelli's

> 1968 film. Learning was never such fun!-

BZZZT! Olivia Hussey. But thanks for playing.

--
Bob Lieblich
Who also went topless at 15

Roland Hutchinson

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Aug 19, 2011, 1:38:30 AM8/19/11
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No sheep for you, Mr Hill!

--
Roland Hutchinson

He calls himself "the Garden State's leading violist da gamba,"
... comparable to being ruler of an exceptionally small duchy.
--Newark (NJ) Star Ledger ( http://tinyurl.com/RolandIsNJ )

Bob Lieblich

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Aug 19, 2011, 7:18:38 AM8/19/11
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On Aug 19, 1:38 am, Roland Hutchinson <my.spamt...@verizon.net> wrote:
> On Thu, 18 Aug 2011 13:31:44 -0700, Bob Lieblich wrote:
> > On Aug 18, 12:11 pm, Harrison Hill <harrish...@gmx.com> wrote:
>
> > [ ... ]
>
> >> In my final year studying English at school we studied "The Millers
> >> Tale" for our exams. I am still amazed at how erotic, and rude, and
> >> funny it is. Our other text was "Romeo & Juliet" so we went to see
> >> Olivia de Havilland (topless aged 15 years) in Franco Zeffirelli's 1968
> >> film. Learning was never such fun!-
>
> > BZZZT!  Olivia Hussey.  But thanks for playing.
>
> No sheep for you, Mr Hill!

Well, at least he didn't name Ollivia Newton-John.

--
Bob Lieblich
Is there any truth to the story that a set of triplets were given the
names Ollivia, Newton, and John?

Harrison Hill

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Aug 19, 2011, 7:24:44 AM8/19/11
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On Aug 19, 12:18 pm, Bob Lieblich <rliebl...@comcast.net> wrote:
> On Aug 19, 1:38 am, Roland Hutchinson <my.spamt...@verizon.net> wrote:
>
> > On Thu, 18 Aug 2011 13:31:44 -0700, Bob Lieblich wrote:
> > > On Aug 18, 12:11 pm, Harrison Hill <harrish...@gmx.com> wrote:
>
> > > [ ... ]
>
> > >> In my final year studying English at school we studied "The Millers
> > >> Tale" for our exams. I am still amazed at how erotic, and rude, and
> > >> funny it is. Our other text was "Romeo & Juliet" so we went to see
> > >> Olivia de Havilland (topless aged 15 years) in Franco Zeffirelli's 1968
> > >> film. Learning was never such fun!-
>
> > > BZZZT!  Olivia Hussey.  But thanks for playing.
>
> > No sheep for you, Mr Hill!
>
> Well, at least he didn't name Ollivia Newton-John.

I least I can link to that one without being arrested. For Laura:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyUWkQj0Q_U

LFS

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Aug 19, 2011, 8:28:47 AM8/19/11
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On 19/08/2011 12:18, Bob Lieblich wrote:
> On Aug 19, 1:38 am, Roland Hutchinson<my.spamt...@verizon.net> wrote:
>> On Thu, 18 Aug 2011 13:31:44 -0700, Bob Lieblich wrote:
>>> On Aug 18, 12:11 pm, Harrison Hill<harrish...@gmx.com> wrote:
>>
>>> [ ... ]
>>
>>>> In my final year studying English at school we studied "The Millers
>>>> Tale" for our exams. I am still amazed at how erotic, and rude, and
>>>> funny it is. Our other text was "Romeo& Juliet" so we went to see

>>>> Olivia de Havilland (topless aged 15 years) in Franco Zeffirelli's 1968
>>>> film. Learning was never such fun!-
>>
>>> BZZZT! Olivia Hussey. But thanks for playing.
>>
>> No sheep for you, Mr Hill!
>
> Well, at least he didn't name Ollivia Newton-John.
>

Who only has one L.

--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)


Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 22, 2011, 7:44:13 AM8/22/11
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The T. O. poem is very short. Only 25 words have survived.

--
VB
T. O. Panellist

Sproz

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Aug 23, 2011, 6:11:10 AM8/23/11
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I wonder where dem foweles is. No, not that poem;

Frith.

Mark

Vinny Burgoo

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Aug 23, 2011, 6:26:38 AM8/23/11
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Thank you!

Explanation:

Fowles in the frith,
The fisshes in the flod,
And I mon waxe wood.
Much sorwe I walke with
For best of bon and blood.

Sproz

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Aug 23, 2011, 7:07:05 AM8/23/11
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I /knew/ all those hours learning Britten's Sacred and Profane would
pay off in the end.

Mark

Jerry Friedman

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Aug 23, 2011, 8:56:18 AM8/23/11
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Your Middle English Cormo will arrive soon.

--
Jerry Friedman, T. O. Swain

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