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Usage of "Booked" not in OED

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No One

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Dec 29, 2002, 4:09:32 PM12/29/02
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I had chance to use the word "booked" the other day and everyone understood
my meaning instantly, yet I can find no reference to the usage in OED.

Specifically, we had a female juvenile in custody on a missing person
charge, and transported her to a local juvenile shelter since Mom & Dad
refused to come get her. The shelter is well known for have no security
whatsoever and more often than not people just walk off from there. Anyway,
I dispatched the call to the officer as "The female juvenile you dropped off
at the Oasis Center just booked." The officer and everyone listening
understood the usage of "booked" as "ran away".

Although I grew up with this usage, I don't think this is a regional
expression as I am pretty sure I've heard it used that way on TV. Anyone
care to have a go at this, and why OED doesn't list it ? (At least from
One-Look Dictionary search's link to OED.)

Thanks,
Bill Stewart
Cape Coral, FL


Don Phillipson

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Dec 29, 2002, 4:22:57 PM12/29/02
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"No One" <No...@NoWhere.net> wrote in message
news:gwJP9.12445$j8.4...@twister.tampabay.rr.com...

> I dispatched the call to the officer as "The female juvenile you dropped
off
> at the Oasis Center just booked." The officer and everyone listening
> understood the usage of "booked" as "ran away".
>
> Although I grew up with this usage, I don't think this is a regional
> expression as I am pretty sure I've heard it used that way on TV. Anyone
> care to have a go at this, and why OED doesn't list it ? (At least from
> One-Look Dictionary search's link to OED.)

1. This is an Americanism, rare in Britain; it
appears to refer to the register of daily events
(a book) maintained by US desk sergeants.
2. It is now known in Britain via TV (a catchphrase
in the series Hawaii 5-0); only I simply do not
know whether it is used in the same sense.
3. The possibly regional origins of your word "booked"
do not matter: all words have to originate somewhere.
(I should be more interested in the word "booked" or
"hooked" heard by your interlocutors.)

--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
dphil...@trytel.com.com.com.less2


Don Aitken

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Dec 29, 2002, 5:09:59 PM12/29/02
to

The British usage is precisely the opposite to the one Bill describes.
The desk sergeant books someone by formally accepting them into
custody. This is a required part of the procedure - he is required to
satisfy himself that the person has been lawfully arrested, and make a
record of the fact. The practice goes back a long time; most of the
documentation police are now required to do has a much more recent
origin. It was to be heard in virtually every episode of "Dixon of
Dock Green", back in the fifties.

The "run away" meaning is entirely new to me.

--
Don Aitken

Mark Wallace

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Dec 29, 2002, 6:39:49 PM12/29/02
to

The 'run away' usage is popular in Chandler, and other hard-boiled
dick, crime-story stuff, but I have no idea how it came about.
Doc Robin will probably know; he likes that genre.

--
Mark Wallace
-----------------------------------------------------
For the intelligent approach to nasty humour, visit:
The Anglo-American Humour (humor) Site
http://humorpages.virtualave.net/mainmenu.htm
-----------------------------------------------------

CyberCypher

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Dec 29, 2002, 6:50:49 PM12/29/02
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"No One" <No...@NoWhere.net> burbled
news:gwJP9.12445$j8.4...@twister.tampabay.rr.com:

I think it's much too recent for the OED. I checked a few other online
dictionaries and couldn't find this usage either, but I've known it for
maybe 20 years. I think (just a guess, mind you) that it's African
American slang and common in all regions of the USA.


--
Franke: Speaker and teacher of Standard International English (SIE)


Bermuda999

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Dec 29, 2002, 6:51:22 PM12/29/02
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Don Aitken don-a...@freeuk.com

"Book 'em, Danno"

Tony Cooper

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Dec 29, 2002, 7:00:16 PM12/29/02
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On Mon, 30 Dec 2002 00:39:49 +0100, "Mark Wallace" <mwal...@dse.nl>
wrote:

The surprise at the word "booked" meaning "ran away" surprises me. I
would understand the word - in this context - to mean not only ran
away, but ran away very quickly: She booked out of here.

I am a little surprised that a police officer would use the term since
"booked" also means entered into the system after being arrested. The
arrest is the action, and the booking is the recording. It would seem
to be confusing to say "she booked" on the radio since it could be
misunderstood to mean "she was booked".

"Booked", in the leaving sense, is not limited to escaping or running
away. If I was at a party of the younger set, and asked where
so-and-so was, the answer might be "He booked". It would just mean he
left. If I was hipper than I am, I might say to my wife "Let's book"
meaning "Let's leave".


--
Provider of Jots, Tittles and the occasional "Oy!"
Tony Cooper aka tony_cooper213 at yahoo.com

John Dean

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Dec 29, 2002, 7:05:19 PM12/29/02
to

'OED' can mean a lot of things. The full version is available on-line only
for a subscription (or via certain subscription sites). The OneLook link is
to http://www.askoxford.com/ which has a limited range of information.
I have the OED on CD and it talks of 'book' as a verb for police activity as
follows :-

c. To make an entry of or against a person's name; esp. to enter (a name) in
a police register for an alleged offence; see also quot. 1846.
1841 Fistiana 58 The names of individuals of distinction were ‘booked’
for indictment, should the prosecution of the principal+end in a conviction.
1846 Snowden Magistrate's Assistant 344 Caught, taken, or disposed of:
booked.

On the other sense, it has :

To enter (the arrival or departure of an employee, hotel guest, etc.) in a
book; so to book in, out. Also intr. to book off, to sign an attendance book
on going off duty.
1902 Daily Chron. 13 May 10/5 Baker's+Bookkeeper.—Young lady required,
with good experience, to book men and keep books.

But I'm not familiar with the particular sense you use.
--
John Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply


rzed

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Dec 29, 2002, 7:25:08 PM12/29/02
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"CyberCypher" <fra...@seed.net.tw> wrote in message
news:Xns92F44FD4E...@130.133.1.4...

I heard this usage no later than 1968 (from a co-worker in a job in left in
that year), in the US Midwest. I don't know the origin, although I'd think
it is at least related to the use of "boogie" to mean "go." It may be more
common to say something like "let's book it" than "let's book."

--
rzed

my-wings

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Dec 29, 2002, 7:17:31 PM12/29/02
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"Mark Wallace" <mwal...@dse.nl> wrote in message
news:auo16e$8stb0$1...@ID-51325.news.dfncis.de...

I remember hearing the term in the late 1960's. I recall it as a slang term
for "to leave," as in: "Let's book." I don't recall any connotation of
running away, but there was a certain amount of alacrity associated with
it..

Alice
product of the American mid-west


Pan

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Dec 29, 2002, 7:35:39 PM12/29/02
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On Sun, 29 Dec 2002 22:09:59 +0000, Don Aitken <don-a...@freeuk.com>
wrote:


>The British usage is precisely the opposite to the one Bill describes.
>The desk sergeant books someone by formally accepting them into
>custody. This is a required part of the procedure - he is required to
>satisfy himself that the person has been lawfully arrested, and make a
>record of the fact.

[snip]

We use the word that way, too. One is arrested, taken to the station,
and booked. But "Gotta book!" means "I/we have to leave!"

Michael

ann bishop

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Dec 29, 2002, 7:48:14 PM12/29/02
to
Don Aitken <don-a...@freeuk.com> wrote:

> The British usage is precisely the opposite to the one Bill describes.
> The desk sergeant books someone by formally accepting them into
> custody. This is a required part of the procedure - he is required to
> satisfy himself that the person has been lawfully arrested, and make a
> record of the fact. The practice goes back a long time; most of the
> documentation police are now required to do has a much more recent
> origin. It was to be heard in virtually every episode of "Dixon of
> Dock Green", back in the fifties.
>
> The "run away" meaning is entirely new to me.

Entirely new to me too."Booked"is also used by parking
inspectors,thankfully I haven't been booked by one of those recently but
I have been "booked"by the police for doing an illegal right turn.
I imagine "booked"comes from your name being taken down in an official
book.
--
annieb

anni...@optusnet.com.au

Ronald Raygun

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Dec 29, 2002, 8:02:42 PM12/29/02
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No One wrote:

> Specifically, we had a female juvenile in custody on a missing person
> charge,

Not answering the original question, sorry, but taking issue
with "a missing person charge". THIS IS TERRIBLE! Makes it
sound as though it's a crime to "be missing".

Brian Wickham

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Dec 29, 2002, 8:23:17 PM12/29/02
to

This is new to me. I have spent most of my life in the NYC area and
have never heard it at all. I've also mispent a lot of my life in
front of a TV set and never heard it there, or maybe it just slipped
by me. To me, "booked" means turned over to the sergeant at the
booking desk in a precinct house.

Brian Wickham

Mary Shafer Iliff

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Dec 29, 2002, 8:42:52 PM12/29/02
to
Don Aitken wrote:

> The "run away" meaning is entirely new to me.

It doesn't mean "run away", it means "leave". I was sitting in
a meeting when the person holding it said, "Everyone but the
members of the Configuration Control Panel can book now" and I
booked. I've also heard some of my co-workers sat "I'm booking"
as they leave for the day.

It's not new, as I've been using it for at least a decade, and
probably longer. Let's see, it wasn't new when I was the FTE
on AFTI/F-16, making up flight cards with a DECmate II, so that
would put it back to some time before about 1992.

Mary

Bermuda999

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Dec 29, 2002, 9:13:20 PM12/29/02
to
Mary Shafer Iliff mil...@qnet.com

The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang:

"book...
3. [infl. by BOOG, BOOGIE, v.] to leave.; to go fast; move along. -- also
constr. with 'it', 'up'."

[snip of cites going back as far as 1974]

Don Phillipson

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Dec 29, 2002, 9:17:42 PM12/29/02
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"Ronald Raygun" <no....@localhost.localdomain> wrote in message
news:SWMP9.6936$hL6.47...@news-text.cableinet.net...

As well as charged with a crime, this
might mean just that the police had been
charged to find someone under age and missing.

Pan

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Dec 29, 2002, 9:32:25 PM12/29/02
to
On Mon, 30 Dec 2002 01:23:17 GMT, bwic...@nyc.rr.com (Brian Wickham)
wrote:

>This is new to me. I have spent most of my life in the NYC area and
>have never heard it at all.

[snip]

That's strange to me.

I first came across it when my brother was at SUNY-Binghamton, I
think. Perhaps it was used a lot by the Long Islanders who seemed to
be a majority of the population at that school.

Michael

Laura F Spira

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Dec 30, 2002, 12:40:28 AM12/30/02
to

"Da-da da-da DA da.." Thanks for that - the potential STS of the DoDG
signature tune (and even more irritating image of Jack Warner saying
"Evening, all") has now been neatly overlaid.


--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)

david56

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Dec 30, 2002, 6:04:34 AM12/30/02
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Bermuda999 wrote:
> Don Aitken don-a...@freeuk.com
>
>>The British usage is precisely the opposite to the one Bill describes.
>>The desk sergeant books someone by formally accepting them into
>>custody. This is a required part of the procedure - he is required to
>>satisfy himself that the person has been lawfully arrested, and make a
>>record of the fact. The practice goes back a long time; most of the
>>documentation police are now required to do has a much more recent
>>origin. It was to be heard in virtually every episode of "Dixon of
>>Dock Green", back in the fifties.
>
> "Book 'em, Danno"

"Book 'em, Danno, Murder One".

I have never knowingly heard booked meaning skedaddled. The H5O tag
line above seemed to be the standard meaning of "write their name in a
book reserved for those being arrested".

--
David
-
When I snuff it bury me quick, then let carousels begin.
=====
The address is valid today, but I will change it to keep ahead of the
spammers.

John Dean

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Dec 30, 2002, 6:34:39 AM12/30/02
to

Johnny Todd he took a notion
For to cross the ocean wide ....

Laura F Spira

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Dec 30, 2002, 6:55:11 AM12/30/02
to
John Dean wrote:
>
> Laura F Spira wrote:
> > Bermuda999 wrote:
> >>
> >> Don Aitken don-a...@freeuk.com
> >>
> >>>
> >>> The British usage is precisely the opposite to the one Bill
> >>> describes.
> >>> The desk sergeant books someone by formally accepting them into
> >>> custody. This is a required part of the procedure - he is required
> >>> to satisfy himself that the person has been lawfully arrested, and
> >>> make a record of the fact. The practice goes back a long time; most
> >>> of the documentation police are now required to do has a much more
> >>> recent
> >>> origin. It was to be heard in virtually every episode of "Dixon of
> >>> Dock Green", back in the fifties.
> >>
> >> "Book 'em, Danno"
> >
> > "Da-da da-da DA da.." Thanks for that - the potential STS of the DoDG
> > signature tune (and even more irritating image of Jack Warner saying
> > "Evening, all") has now been neatly overlaid.
>
> Johnny Todd he took a notion
> For to cross the ocean wide ....

Now that is *cruel*. Be afraid, be very afraid...

Frances Kemmish

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Dec 30, 2002, 7:32:06 AM12/30/02
to


But Laura, the nostalgia! I just spent ten minutes playing it over and
over - it takes me back to my youth - Tuesday nights round the
flickering black and white TV....Aaaaaah..

According to this page, you can even get your mobile phone to play it as
a ring tone:

http://www.hut.fi/~mhbarker/football/Z-Cars.html

Fran

Matti Lamprhey

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Dec 30, 2002, 7:32:28 AM12/30/02
to
"david56" <bass.b...@ntlworld.com> wrote...

> Bermuda999 wrote:
> >
> > "Book 'em, Danno"
>
> "Book 'em, Danno, Murder One".
>
> I have never knowingly heard booked meaning skedaddled. The H5O tag
> line above seemed to be the standard meaning of "write their name in a
> book reserved for those being arrested".

Yes. And "booked out" is entirely understandable as slang for "ran away".
Somewhere along the line some illiterate dickhead thought he could omit that
vital modifier. STGM. [1]

[1] Sic Transit Gloria Mundi

Matti


R Fontana

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Dec 30, 2002, 8:09:30 AM12/30/02
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On Mon, 30 Dec 2002, Brian Wickham wrote:

> This is new to me. I have spent most of my life in the NYC area and
> have never heard it at all. I've also mispent a lot of my life in
> front of a TV set and never heard it there, or maybe it just slipped
> by me.

I think I've only heard it on TV and the like, never in real life. My
impression is that it's relatively archaic or obsolete slang, but then
I used to say that about 'cool'.

ann bishop

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Dec 30, 2002, 8:12:10 AM12/30/02
to
Pan <panNO...@musician.org> wrote:

> We use the word that way, too. One is arrested, taken to the station,
> and booked. But "Gotta book!" means "I/we have to leave!"
>
> Michael

Perhaps the "leave"meaning is purely US.
It certainly isn't used that way in Australia.

--
annieb

anni...@optusnet.com.au

Frances Kemmish

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Dec 30, 2002, 8:30:38 AM12/30/02
to

We talked about this before (I looked it up - it was in 1999), and most
of the people who knew the usage came from the Midwest. I know someone
from Binghamton who says "book" meaning "move fast", and when we
discussed it in 1999, someone from Buffalo or Rochester also said they
used it.

It's not archaic, just regional.

Pan

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Dec 30, 2002, 8:41:06 AM12/30/02
to
On Mon, 30 Dec 2002 08:09:30 -0500, R Fontana
<rf...@sparky.cs.nyu.edu> wrote:

>I think I've only heard it on TV and the like, never in real life. My
>impression is that it's relatively archaic or obsolete slang, but then
>I used to say that about 'cool'.

You really _are_ a callow youth. :-)

Michael

P.S. What did you say for "cool"? "Rad"?

Tony Cooper

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Dec 30, 2002, 9:04:46 AM12/30/02
to

I plead guilty to being of Midwest origins, but have trouble accepting
"book" with this meaning as regional. Another form is "He was really
booking" meaning that he was moving fast.

Martin Ambuhl

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Dec 30, 2002, 9:12:41 AM12/30/02
to
No One wrote:


> Anyone
> care to have a go at this, and why OED doesn't list it ? (At least from
> One-Look Dictionary search's link to OED.)

How did you get One-Look Dictionary to give a link to OED? When I tried,
the link was to Oxford Paperback Dictionary and Thesaurus, a dictionary of
very limited coverage and depth.


John Dean

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Dec 30, 2002, 10:27:18 AM12/30/02
to
Laura F Spira wrote:
> John Dean wrote:
>>
>>
>> Johnny Todd he took a notion
>> For to cross the ocean wide ....
>
> Now that is *cruel*. Be afraid, be very afraid...

I shall fear nothing. I have taken Frank Windsor's sage advice and I have
Insurance up the ying-yang as well as a life subscription to SAGA

John Dean

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Dec 30, 2002, 10:28:51 AM12/30/02
to

GRT [2]

[2] Goodbye Ruby Tuesday

Laura F Spira

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Dec 30, 2002, 10:41:32 AM12/30/02
to

You might not feel that way were you subjected to occasional TV glimpses
of the very elderly-looking Fancy Smith and Bert Lynch, reminding you of
just how long ago those Tuesday nights were...

I'm glad it made someone happy. The tune has caused me *real* bother for
the last few hours. I have just walked past Mr Dean's house: had there
been an odd brick lying about, I might have found it difficult to resist
the temptation to lob it through his window.

Padraig Breathnach

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Dec 30, 2002, 10:52:11 AM12/30/02
to
Tony Cooper <tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:

It depends on what size region you have in mind. I'm fairly sure that
"booked" is not used in Ireland in any of the senses "run away" or
"escape" or "get out" or "move fast".

PB

Laura F Spira

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Dec 30, 2002, 11:03:00 AM12/30/02
to

WM3A

John Lawler

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Dec 30, 2002, 12:22:21 PM12/30/02
to
Tony Cooper <tony_co...@yahoo.com> writes:
>Frances Kemmish <fkem...@optonline.net> writes:
>>R Fontana writes:

>>>Brian Wickham writes:

>>>>This is new to me. I have spent most of my life in the NYC area and
>>>>have never heard it at all. I've also mispent a lot of my life in
>>>>front of a TV set and never heard it there, or maybe it just slipped
>>>>by me.

>>> I think I've only heard it on TV and the like, never in real life. My
>>> impression is that it's relatively archaic or obsolete slang, but then
>>> I used to say that about 'cool'.

>>We talked about this before (I looked it up - it was in 1999), and most
>>of the people who knew the usage came from the Midwest. I know someone
>>from Binghamton who says "book" meaning "move fast", and when we
>>discussed it in 1999, someone from Buffalo or Rochester also said they
>>used it.

>>It's not archaic, just regional.

>I plead guilty to being of Midwest origins, but have trouble accepting
>"book" with this meaning as regional. Another form is "He was really
>booking" meaning that he was moving fast.

This is the one I'm (remotely) familiar with.

A couple of years ago, in a semantics class, we were doing a joint project
on categorizing the English verbs of unaided physical motion (run, walk,
saunter, jump, etc.) and "book" got suggested. When I expressed surprise,
all the students (born after 1978 and mostly Midwestern) agreed:
o that it was common,
o that they'd used it since childhood,
o that it meant "move fast"
(as, e.g, on a bicycle),
o that it was most commonly used in the progressive
("He was really bookin'"), and
o that it was a cool expression
(i.e, kids their age used it and they wouldn't expect it from adults).

For my (b.1942 DeKalb IL) part, I'd never used it or heard it used in that
sense (or in the "take leave" sense) before, and haven't since, though the
police sergeant's sense is quite familiar.

I have no idea where or when it originated, nor what its source might be
(i.e, I can think of several possibilities off the top of my head, and
have no evidence for the correctness of any of them).

-John Lawler http://www.umich.edu/~jlawler U Michigan Linguistics Dept
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
"A man does not know what he is saying until he knows what he
is not saying." -- G.K. Chesterton, 1936, "As I Was Saying"

John Todd

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Dec 30, 2002, 12:59:31 PM12/30/02
to
On Sun, 29 Dec 2002 19:00:16 -0500, Tony Cooper
<tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>The surprise at the word "booked" meaning "ran away" surprises me. I
>would understand the word - in this context - to mean not only ran
>away, but ran away very quickly: She booked out of here.
>
>I am a little surprised that a police officer would use the term since
>"booked" also means entered into the system after being arrested. The
>arrest is the action, and the booking is the recording. It would seem
>to be confusing to say "she booked" on the radio since it could be
>misunderstood to mean "she was booked".
>
>"Booked", in the leaving sense, is not limited to escaping or running
>away. If I was at a party of the younger set, and asked where
>so-and-so was, the answer might be "He booked". It would just mean he
>left. If I was hipper than I am, I might say to my wife "Let's book"
>meaning "Let's leave".

I'd be interested in seeing your guess about the expression's
origin, Tony.

--
_______________________________________
John E. Todd <> jt...@island.net

Note: Ensure correct polarity prior to connection.

Brian Wickham

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Dec 30, 2002, 2:50:38 PM12/30/02
to

This really opens a can of worms! I'm older than RF but from the same
general area. To me, "cool" was out, since it was used by adult jazz
fans only and was associated, humoruosly, with berets and chin
whiskers. As a kid we said "weak", 1951ish; "wicked" 1953ish; "cool",
a rebirth in the mid 1950s; "boss" very briefly in the late 1950s; and
then we spoke English, NYC version mostly, from that time on. "Cool"
came back in the early 1960s as the only way to describe the James
Bond persona. But that was not a use of "cool" in the street sense.
"Cool" had become mainstream by then and was unusable as slang until a
new generation came along.

The above are just my observations and can't be proven by me.

Brian Wickham

Tony Cooper

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Dec 30, 2002, 3:39:55 PM12/30/02
to
On 30 Dec 2002 17:59:31 GMT, jo...@Neopha.44in88.net (John Todd) wrote:

>On Sun, 29 Dec 2002 19:00:16 -0500, Tony Cooper
> <tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>
>>The surprise at the word "booked" meaning "ran away" surprises me. I
>>would understand the word - in this context - to mean not only ran
>>away, but ran away very quickly: She booked out of here.
>>
>>I am a little surprised that a police officer would use the term since
>>"booked" also means entered into the system after being arrested. The
>>arrest is the action, and the booking is the recording. It would seem
>>to be confusing to say "she booked" on the radio since it could be
>>misunderstood to mean "she was booked".
>>
>>"Booked", in the leaving sense, is not limited to escaping or running
>>away. If I was at a party of the younger set, and asked where
>>so-and-so was, the answer might be "He booked". It would just mean he
>>left. If I was hipper than I am, I might say to my wife "Let's book"
>>meaning "Let's leave".
>
> I'd be interested in seeing your guess about the expression's
>origin, Tony.

I have absolutely no idea. It's one of those words or phrases that
one hears, absorbs, and sometimes uses without any thought of the
origin. People assume most such phrases come from African-American
origins, but I feel that caucasian have also contributed to the
lexicon of indefinite origin usage with equal creativity.

It's a usage that does not conjure up a mental image of what it means
like, say, "hauling ass". I don't think it's necessarily wrong for a
word or phrase not to have a coining reason or date of origin. I am
always distrustful of people that say "The first time I heard that
phrase was late afternoon in the second week of August, 1971, in a
stationery store in Parma, Ohio." A claim impossible to refute, but
one that sounds too pat for me.

Speaking of stationery stores, and to segue back to a previous thread,
I saw a wondrous thing the other day: a Pilot retractable fountain
pen. A mere $115.00.

R Fontana

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Dec 30, 2002, 3:36:30 PM12/30/02
to

Well, you asked, so I better answer. "Rad"? No, of course not. As far
as I can remember, we had no reason to use any such word, for the most
part. I mean, it's sort of like the ridiculosity of such words was
apparent from the get-go. In the case of "cool", the get-go was, as a
rule, the popular 1970s sitcom about an idealized version of the
1950s, _Happy Days_. Speaking of 1970s Fifties-revivalism, one thing
that divided kids in the late '70s was the popular movie _Grease_. I
don't know whether "cool" was used in _Grease_, but I have the
intuition that if a kid liked _Grease_ when he or she was 11 they were
more likely to use "cool" five or six years later. Needless to say, I
didn't like _Grease_, which I saw as a bad cultural development. Hey
C**p, did your kids like _Grease_?

I noticed a gradual increase in youth usage of "cool" during my teenage
years, from about 1982 to 1987. I can't recall a single usage of
"cool" before 1982 that was not ironical or jocular or Fonzie-referent
in nature. Even those were pretty uncommon if not completely
nonexistent [note to RJV: I'm not saying that the usage didn't
exist at that time] (unlike "nerd", another word that was popularized
by _Happy Days_, as I have convincingly shown). The guy who used it
in 1982 was not a New York speaker, but I don't remember where he was
from. Chances are it was a northeastern suburb. I do remember that he
was white and middle-class and he had shoulder-length hair, he fancied
himself an electric guitar player like so many white male middle-class
American adolescents from that era, and he -- I'm not making this up
-- was a fan of the beat combo 'Def Leppard'. I think this is probably
extremely significant. He used 'cool' in the following sentence:
"That ain't cool". The 'ain't' was ironical, but I don't think the
'cool' was.

After 1982, I don't believe I heard 'cool' again until the end of my
high school years, in 1985 and 1986. The people I started to hear
using 'cool' were, as a rule, (a) people who lived on the Upper West
Side of Manhattan, or else (b) people who spent a lot of time with
people who lived on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, and it was
without exception students who had relatively high social status. I
think this too may be very significant. I don't want to give you the
impression that 'cool' was commonly used by such people. But it was
occasionally used, and naturally so. And other people just
didn't use it. However, I'm dead sure it was only used as an
adjective at this time. When I started college in 1987 I began to hear
adjectival "cool" used with even greater frequency; I went to a college
whose student body was drawn from all over the place but the biggest
concentration was people from the East Coast, especially the New York,
Boston and D.C. metropolitan regions, particularly the New York one.

I don't know when I started to hear the special interjection "Cool!" or
its variant "Kewl!", but I don't remember being strongly aware of this
till after 1990, which is quite late. Sure (hi RJV!), maybe it was
used way back in _Fast Times at Ridgemont High_, but I still haven't
seen that.

Regarding 'what word did I use', like I said, I can't recall ever
needing one. I think for some uses of 'cool' today we'd use "good" or
"great", maybe "neat" which I still sometimes say today, but that
might be more from my childhood speech. When I was in
seventh grade (1980-1981) many boys (not girls) in my grade started
using "Excellent!", and I remember there being an awareness of it
being sort of an ironical faddish youth thing of the day. This died
out quickly, but it's interesting that it persisted in the larger
society, and I think even today "Excellent!" is associated with young
teenagers. It's my recollection that the kids who were using
"Excellent!" in 1980-1981 were pretty much exactly the same as the kids
who had microcomputers at home and a special interest in subjects
mathematical and scientific.

I can remember some of us jocularly and ironically using "awesome" in
imitation of Valley Girl speech, but the point is that it was
essentially foreign, the whole notion of needing such a word. Probably
some people similarly jocularly used "cool", and I'm just not
remembering it. But one thing's for sure, the Upper West Side hipsters
in the mid-'80s were using it naturally (though not continuously).

Regarding gender, my sense from looking back on the 1985-1989 period
is that the users of "cool" were more likely to be female.
The first bizarre older-generation-reappropriation of "cool" that I
noticed was in 1990.


Tony Cooper

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Dec 30, 2002, 4:05:32 PM12/30/02
to

In Ireland, or at least in parts of Ireland, the word is heard as
"fooked", as in "He fooked out a here, didn't he?"

John Dawkins

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Dec 30, 2002, 4:18:32 PM12/30/02
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In article <auo16e$8stb0$1...@ID-51325.news.dfncis.de>,
"Mark Wallace" <mwal...@dse.nl> wrote:

> Don Aitken wrote:
> > On Sun, 29 Dec 2002 16:22:57 -0500, "Don Phillipson"
> > <dphil...@trytel.com> wrote:
> >
> >> "No One" <No...@NoWhere.net> wrote in message
> >> news:gwJP9.12445$j8.4...@twister.tampabay.rr.com...
> >>
> >>> I dispatched the call to the officer as "The female juvenile
> >>> you dropped off at the Oasis Center just booked." The officer
> >>> and everyone listening understood the usage of "booked" as "ran
> >>> away".
> >>>
> >>> Although I grew up with this usage, I don't think this is a
> >>> regional expression as I am pretty sure I've heard it used that

> >>> way on TV. Anyone care to have a go at this, and why OED


> >>> doesn't list it ? (At least from One-Look Dictionary search's
> >>> link to OED.)
> >>

> >> 1. This is an Americanism, rare in Britain; it
> >> appears to refer to the register of daily events
> >> (a book) maintained by US desk sergeants.
> >> 2. It is now known in Britain via TV (a catchphrase
> >> in the series Hawaii 5-0); only I simply do not
> >> know whether it is used in the same sense.
> >> 3. The possibly regional origins of your word "booked"
> >> do not matter: all words have to originate somewhere.
> >> (I should be more interested in the word "booked" or
> >> "hooked" heard by your interlocutors.)
> >

> > The British usage is precisely the opposite to the one Bill
> > describes. The desk sergeant books someone by formally accepting
> > them into custody. This is a required part of the procedure - he
> > is required to satisfy himself that the person has been lawfully
> > arrested, and make a record of the fact. The practice goes back a
> > long time; most of the documentation police are now required to
> > do has a much more recent origin. It was to be heard in virtually
> > every episode of "Dixon of Dock Green", back in the fifties.
> >

> > The "run away" meaning is entirely new to me.
>
> The 'run away' usage is popular in Chandler, and other hard-boiled
> dick, crime-story stuff, but I have no idea how it came about.
> Doc Robin will probably know; he likes that genre.

Do you remember which Chandler novel or story this usage appears in?

--
J.

Padraig Breathnach

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Dec 30, 2002, 4:57:52 PM12/30/02
to
Tony Cooper <tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:

>On Mon, 30 Dec 2002 15:52:11 +0000, Padraig Breathnach
><padr...@iol.ie> wrote:
>
>>Tony Cooper <tony_co...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>
>>>On Mon, 30 Dec 2002 08:30:38 -0500, Frances Kemmish
>>><fkem...@optonline.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>>We talked about this before (I looked it up - it was in 1999), and most
>>>>of the people who knew the usage came from the Midwest. I know someone
>>>>from Binghamton who says "book" meaning "move fast", and when we
>>>>discussed it in 1999, someone from Buffalo or Rochester also said they
>>>>used it.
>>>>
>>>>It's not archaic, just regional.
>>>
>>>I plead guilty to being of Midwest origins, but have trouble accepting
>>>"book" with this meaning as regional. Another form is "He was really
>>>booking" meaning that he was moving fast.
>>
>>It depends on what size region you have in mind. I'm fairly sure that
>>"booked" is not used in Ireland in any of the senses "run away" or
>>"escape" or "get out" or "move fast".
>>
>
>In Ireland, or at least in parts of Ireland, the word is heard as
>"fooked", as in "He fooked out a here, didn't he?"

That's "fucked", the Swiss army vocabulary knife of the inarticulate.

PB

Tony Cooper

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Dec 30, 2002, 5:16:30 PM12/30/02
to

I am aware of the meaning. Phonetically, though, it is "fooked" in
some areas. Tell me you haven't heard "The fookin' thing won't fit in
the fookin' place where it's supposed to fookin' fit. I'm fookin'
tired of fookin' wi' it. It can get fooked for all I care."

david56

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Dec 30, 2002, 6:12:02 PM12/30/02