Dond(s)

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Will

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Sep 12, 2008, 9:31:41 AM9/12/08
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Has anyone come across the word "dond" before? I first saw it in the
wild about ten minutes ago here:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2008/sep/12/1

This is a blog about readers recommending songs of revenge. An
example of the use of "dond":

Snadfrod:

Ooh.

Song for the Dumped, Ben Folds Five.


ToffeeBoy:

@ snad - instadonds for Ben Folds' Dumped


Snadfrod:

Donds for Delilah and Ryan Adams. Now who chose their colour based on
football?...

I guess that it's more or less equivalent to the modern meaning of
"kudos", but where does it come from?

Thanks

Will.

Peter Duncanson (BrE)

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Sep 12, 2008, 10:27:05 AM9/12/08
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I'm still scratching my head wondering.

DOND is an acronym for the TV show Deal Or No Deal.

There just might be some connection, but I haven't figured it out.

--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)

Donna Richoux

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Sep 12, 2008, 10:51:21 AM9/12/08
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Will <bill...@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Has anyone come across the word "dond" before?

No.

>I first saw it in the
> wild about ten minutes ago here:
>
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2008/sep/12/1
>
> This is a blog about readers recommending songs of revenge. An
> example of the use of "dond":

[snip]>

> @ snad - instadonds for Ben Folds' Dumped
>
> Snadfrod:
>
> Donds for Delilah and Ryan Adams. Now who chose their colour based on
> football?...
>
> I guess that it's more or less equivalent to the modern meaning of
> "kudos", but where does it come from?

If you type "donds" into the Google search box, the very first page
explains it, although you have to scroll down a bit. I'll let you find
it. That page also has a link called "Donds? Dondling? A Dondle?" on the
left.

The page is a blog called "The Spill" or "The Overspill," apparently
started by readers of the Guardian (UK), which matches the location you
report.

Apparently "dond" is being used playfully to mean just about anything,
or to substitute for any syllable, so no wonder you couldn't figure it
out from context. It's just a bit of silliness.
--
Best wishes -- Donna Richoux

durf

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Sep 21, 2008, 5:16:48 PM9/21/08
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Donds means "I emphatically agree with the previous statement."

I did a complete search on the origins of "donds" which began in the
Guardian's Readers Recommend music blog. I will try to dig it all
out. The short form is that it began as a typo: "sedonds" instead of
"seconds" as in "I second that emotion." It just got picked up and
transformed. It now appears in other pop culture sites in England.

Pat Durkin

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Sep 21, 2008, 6:01:16 PM9/21/08
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"durf" <obe...@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:bf133a94-22f7-40a6...@k7g2000hsd.googlegroups.com

> On Sep 12, 9:31 am, Will <billri...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> Has anyone come across the word "dond" before? I first saw it in the
>> wild about ten minutes ago here:
>>
>> http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2008/sep/12/1
>>
>> This is a blog about readers recommending songs of revenge. An
>> example of the use of "dond":
>>
>> Snadfrod:
>>
>> Ooh.
>>
>> Song for the Dumped, Ben Folds Five.
>>
>> ToffeeBoy:
>>
>> @ snad - instadonds for Ben Folds' Dumped
>>
>> Snadfrod:
>>
>> Donds for Delilah and Ryan Adams. Now who chose their colour based on
>> football?...
>>
>> I guess that it's more or less equivalent to the modern meaning of
>> "kudos", but where does it come from?

>


> Donds means "I emphatically agree with the previous statement."
>
> I did a complete search on the origins of "donds" which began in the
> Guardian's Readers Recommend music blog. I will try to dig it all
> out. The short form is that it began as a typo: "sedonds" instead of
> "seconds" as in "I second that emotion." It just got picked up and
> transformed. It now appears in other pop culture sites in England.

Glad to hear a mention of "seconds" mispelled as "sedonds". Otherwise,
I would have answered that the usage exemplified in the earlier parts of
this thread strongly resembles the USage of "props" (all due {and
proper} respect).

"Redounds" is another angle of association, with the elided "to his/her
credit" that comes to mind.

durf

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Sep 21, 2008, 8:03:21 PM9/21/08
to
> credit" that comes to mind.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Here is the item I wrote last April after looking at each numbered and
dated post on the Readers Recommend blog:

Donds began its lexical life as a typo, posted on 13 May 2007 at 15:55
by "Ejaydee" of London, who mismanaged "seconds" (as in "I second the
motion"), and wrote "Secdonds for the Sesame Street Theme Toon!!!!"

It lay in the cradle for two months before "BlimpyMcFlah" from
Sheffield posted "Massive sedonds for Joy Division" in mid-July.
After that "seconds" and "sedonds" became interchangeable terms in the
posting history.

“Donds” first appeared when "BlimpyMcFlah" used an apostrophe to
abbreviate in comment no. 657714 at 18 minutes past midnight on 24
August with "Immediate and massive 'donds....".

The word was formalized later that morning (8:58) by "KayM", from
Brighton in comment no. 657986. "Friday, day for bonding and donding
with the RR community (Blimpy - nice shortening!). So first things
first, consider the following donded..."

For a few days, everyone but BlimpyMcFlah and KayM continued with
"sedonds," but on 28 September "donds" really burst on the scene in
many variations, calling forth this definition from DickDastardly:

dondled - adj. - (verb: 'dondle) -- a variant of 'donded, a dialect
peculiar to RR. From the Typographically Challenged "sedonded," via
the English "Seconded."

Since then it has been toyed with in many forms: “dondage,”
“dondarino”, the pseudo- Germanic “gedondheit”. But the default usage
is “Donds to that.”

So far, it has spread from its place of origin to The Word, a British
rock music magazine, and to Youtube. We will see if it will grow and
survive.

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