Pi Day - 14 March

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occam

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Mar 15, 2023, 6:36:33 AMMar 15
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I just found out that yesterday (14th of March) was Pi day.

Does it get more special if Pi Day falls on a Fri Day? (cf Friday 13th.)

<https://www.i-programmer.info/news/85-humour-/16153-pi-day-irrational-and-transcendental.html>

Peter Moylan

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Mar 15, 2023, 6:44:25 AMMar 15
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So someone has finally discovered a reason for putting the month first.

--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org

occam

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Mar 15, 2023, 6:54:39 AMMar 15
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On 15/03/2023 11:44, Peter Moylan wrote:
> On 15/03/23 21:36, occam wrote:
>
>> I just found out that yesterday (14th of March) was Pi day.
>>
>> Does it get more special if Pi Day falls on a Fri Day? (cf Friday 13th.)
>>
>> <https://www.i-programmer.info/news/85-humour-/16153-pi-day-irrational-and-transcendental.html>
>
> So someone has finally discovered a reason for putting the month first.
>

Don't Americans always do that? 03/14/2023? Or am I being whooshed?

J. J. Lodder

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Mar 15, 2023, 7:43:26 AMMar 15
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That's American pi day.
The European one is April 31, aka May first,

Jan

PS Some heretics (burn them all at the stake)
insist that tau-day should be celebrated instead,
on june 28.

Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Mar 15, 2023, 8:46:13 AMMar 15
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And today is the Ides of March. Beware.


--
Athel -- French and British, living in Marseilles for 36 years; mainly
in England until 1987.

Silvano

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Mar 15, 2023, 9:43:41 AMMar 15
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Athel Cornish-Bowden hat am 15.03.2023 um 13:46 geschrieben:
> On 2023-03-15 10:36:28 +0000, occam said:
>
>> I just found out that yesterday (14th of March) was Pi day.
>>
>> Does it get more special if Pi Day falls on a Fri Day? (cf Friday 13th.)
>>
>> <https://www.i-programmer.info/news/85-humour-/16153-pi-day-irrational-and-transcendental.html>
>>
>
> And today is the Ides of March. Beware.

Only if your surname is Caesar.
Perhaps also if you're a "dictator perpetuo".

occam

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Mar 15, 2023, 10:19:56 AMMar 15
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On 15/03/2023 12:43, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> occam <oc...@nowhere.nix> wrote:
>
>> I just found out that yesterday (14th of March) was Pi day.
>>
>> Does it get more special if Pi Day falls on a Fri Day? (cf Friday 13th.)
>>
>> <https://www.i-programmer.info/news/85-humour-/16153-pi-day-irrational-and-tra
> nscendental.html>
>
> That's American pi day.
> The European one is April 31, aka May first,

I do not find any evidence of May 1st as the Day for Pi. However:

"Others opt to celebrate Pi Approximation Day on July 22, representing
the fraction 22/7, which is a way of working out an approximate value
for Pi."

J. J. Lodder

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Mar 15, 2023, 10:39:42 AMMar 15
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Athel Cornish-Bowden <athe...@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 2023-03-15 10:36:28 +0000, occam said:
>
> > I just found out that yesterday (14th of March) was Pi day.
> >
> > Does it get more special if Pi Day falls on a Fri Day? (cf Friday 13th.)
> >
> > <https://www.i-programmer.info/news/85-humour-/16153-pi-day-irrational-and-t
ranscendental.html>
> >
>
> And today is the Ides of March. Beware.

Little need to.
Far less dictators are assasinated than there should have been,

Jan





J. J. Lodder

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Mar 15, 2023, 10:56:11 AMMar 15
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occam <oc...@nowhere.nix> wrote:

> On 15/03/2023 12:43, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> > occam <oc...@nowhere.nix> wrote:
> >
> >> I just found out that yesterday (14th of March) was Pi day.
> >>
> >> Does it get more special if Pi Day falls on a Fri Day? (cf Friday 13th.)
> >>
> >> <https://www.i-programmer.info/news/85-humour-/16153-pi-day-irrational-and-
tra
> > nscendental.html>
> >
> > That's American pi day.
> > The European one is April 31, aka May first,
>
> I do not find any evidence of May 1st as the Day for Pi. However:

It was a joke, sometime, in pi-discussions.

> "Others opt to celebrate Pi Approximation Day on July 22, representing
> the fraction 22/7, which is a way of working out an approximate value
> for Pi."

I think November 10 (the 314th day of the year)
is more common for that one.
All equally silly of course,

Jan


Hibou

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Mar 15, 2023, 12:09:30 PMMar 15
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Le 15/03/2023 à 10:36, occam a écrit :
>
> I just found out that yesterday (14th of March) was Pi day. [...]

Found out - from a circular?

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Mar 15, 2023, 1:43:19 PMMar 15
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I wish 'd posted that, but I never got a round tuit.


--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.

Ken Blake

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Mar 15, 2023, 1:52:51 PMMar 15
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A circular divided by a radial?

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Mar 15, 2023, 4:00:46 PMMar 15
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Beware of Free Radicals! oh radials, sorry, I'm tyred. Hope you aren't
cross with me for plying you with this comment.

Sam Plusnet

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Mar 15, 2023, 7:09:12 PMMar 15
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There is at least one would-be Tzar.

(Currently involved in what the Governor of Florida called:
"A territorial dispute")

--
Sam Plusnet

lar3ryca

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Mar 16, 2023, 1:17:21 PMMar 16
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This tread has certainly taken a turn or two.

--
All generalizations are bad.

J. J. Lodder

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Mar 16, 2023, 4:30:44 PMMar 16
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I'm not intent on hitting you with anything at all,
but it may be practical to know that the American radian
may be expressed in either feet at a thousand yards,
or in inches at 100 yards.

Europeans, and NATO-Americans do it in moa,
which is of course a small fraction of a big pi,

Jan


Sam Plusnet

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Mar 16, 2023, 8:37:03 PMMar 16
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You can't fool us. The moa is an extinct type of large flightless bird.

--
Sam Plusnet

J. J. Lodder

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Mar 17, 2023, 5:00:13 AMMar 17
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Making a radical of that is definitely irrational,

Jan

J. J. Lodder

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Mar 17, 2023, 5:00:13 AMMar 17
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Yes, that too, already discussed otherthread.
It was their one-egg policy that did them in,

Jan

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Mar 17, 2023, 6:26:04 AMMar 17
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It's sad that there aren't any around any moa.

IIRC some long-lived trees in Madagascar are up for extinction as well, as
their seed shells had evolved to survive passage through a giant bird's
gut, but consequently the uncorroded shell is too thick for the seed germ
to erm. germinate. Roc-hard they are.

J. J. Lodder

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Mar 17, 2023, 7:14:04 AMMar 17
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That was Dodos. It seems Turkeys can sustitute,
so no Rocs needed,

Jan

Jerry Friedman

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Mar 17, 2023, 8:47:59 AMMar 17
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On Friday, March 17, 2023 at 5:14:04 AM UTC-6, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> Kerr-Mudd, John <ad...@127.0.0.1> wrote:
...

> > It's sad that there aren't any around any moa.
> >
> > IIRC some long-lived trees in Madagascar are up for extinction as well, as
> > their seed shells had evolved to survive passage through a giant bird's
> > gut, but consequently the uncorroded shell is too thick for the seed germ
> > to erm. germinate. Roc-hard they are.

> That was Dodos. It seems Turkeys can sustitute,
> so no Rocs needed,

If it was Madagascar, it was the aepyornithidae or elephant birds, one
species of which was the heaviest bird known to have lived. The Dodo lived
on Mauritius, a thousand kilometers to the east.

--
Jerry Friedman

J. J. Lodder

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Mar 17, 2023, 10:49:59 AMMar 17
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Jerry Friedman <jerry.fr...@gmail.com> wrote:
Yes, and that's where it is.
The tree is Sideroxylon grandiflorum, aka the Dodo tree.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sideroxylon_grandiflorum>

The dodo connection has been disputed, and it may be false,

Jan

Jerry Friedman

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Mar 17, 2023, 10:55:40 AMMar 17
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Ah, all is now clear.

> The dodo connection has been disputed, and it may be false,

Can't these people get their stories straight?

--
Jerry Friedman

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Mar 17, 2023, 11:39:31 AMMar 17
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Indeed, I don't think dodos could have swallowed the seed I was thinking
of. I still can't recall enough to give a definite reference, it was just
a passing (sic) pun about Roc-hard seeds.

https://www.kew.org/read-and-watch/madagascar-orphan-extinction

seems to be more general about 'orphan plants' that no longer have an
animal large enough to eat it's fruit.

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Mar 17, 2023, 11:41:35 AMMar 17
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Having now readahead, it seems it *was* the Dodo seed tale I was
recalling. Mea Culpa.

lar3ryca

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Mar 17, 2023, 12:19:59 PMMar 17
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They were probably French, and figured that one egg is un oeuf.

--
Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone somewhere may be happy.

Athel Cornish-Bowden

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Mar 17, 2023, 12:24:25 PMMar 17
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On 2023-03-17 12:47:56 +0000, Jerry Friedman said:

> On Friday, March 17, 2023 at 5:14:04 AM UTC-6, J. J. Lodder wrote:
>> Kerr-Mudd, John <ad...@127.0.0.1> wrote:...
>
>>> It's sad that there aren't any around any moa.> >> > IIRC some
>>> long-lived trees in Madagascar are up for extinction as well, as> >
>>> their seed shells had evolved to survive passage through a giant
>>> bird's> > gut, but consequently the uncorroded shell is too thick for
>>> the seed germ> > to erm. germinate. Roc-hard they are.
>
>> That was Dodos. It seems Turkeys can sustitute,>

So can a mechanical grinder.

>> so no Rocs needed,
> If it was Madagascar, it was the aepyornithidae or elephant birds, one
> species of which was the heaviest bird known to have lived. The Dodo lived
> on Mauritius, a thousand kilometers to the east.


--

Bebercito

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Mar 17, 2023, 12:43:24 PMMar 17
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Le mercredi 15 mars 2023 à 12:43:26 UTC+1, J. J. Lodder a écrit :
> occam <oc...@nowhere.nix> wrote:
>
> > I just found out that yesterday (14th of March) was Pi day.
> >
> > Does it get more special if Pi Day falls on a Fri Day? (cf Friday 13th.)
> >
> > <https://www.i-programmer.info/news/85-humour-/16153-pi-day-irrational-and-tra
> nscendental.html>
> That's American pi day.
> The European one is April 31, aka May first,

Or even April first, as "April 31" sounds like an April fool.

Bebercito

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Mar 17, 2023, 12:47:14 PMMar 17
to
I've heard there may still be one alive, but it's a lone moa.

J. J. Lodder

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Mar 17, 2023, 1:04:15 PMMar 17
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Jerry Friedman <jerry.fr...@gmail.com> wrote:
Well, it is science you know, of a kind.
And like nuts, some sciences are harder than others,

Jan

Sam Plusnet

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Mar 17, 2023, 3:32:25 PMMar 17
to
Isn't the avocado in the same situation?
i.e. Land animals big enough to swallow the stone & let it pass through
the digestive tract, were made extinct some time ago.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/why-the-avocado-should-have-gone-the-way-of-the-dodo-4976527/

--
Sam Plusnet

J. J. Lodder

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Mar 17, 2023, 5:00:52 PMMar 17
to
Kerr-Mudd, John <ad...@127.0.0.1> wrote:

> On Fri, 17 Mar 2023 05:47:56 -0700 (PDT)
> Jerry Friedman <jerry.fr...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > On Friday, March 17, 2023 at 5:14:04?AM UTC-6, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> > > Kerr-Mudd, John <ad...@127.0.0.1> wrote:
> > ...
> >
> > > > It's sad that there aren't any around any moa.
> > > >
> > > > IIRC some long-lived trees in Madagascar are up for extinction as
> > > > well, as their seed shells had evolved to survive passage through a
> > > > giant bird's gut, but consequently the uncorroded shell is too thick
> > > > for the seed germ to erm. germinate. Roc-hard they are.
> >
> > > That was Dodos. It seems Turkeys can sustitute,
> > > so no Rocs needed,
> >
> > If it was Madagascar, it was the aepyornithidae or elephant birds, one
> > species of which was the heaviest bird known to have lived. The Dodo lived
> > on Mauritius, a thousand kilometers to the east.
> >
> Indeed, I don't think dodos could have swallowed the seed I was thinking
> of. I still can't recall enough to give a definite reference, it was just
> a passing (sic) pun about Roc-hard seeds.
>
> https://www.kew.org/read-and-watch/madagascar-orphan-extinction
>
> seems to be more general about 'orphan plants' that no longer have an
> animal large enough to eat it's fruit.

You made me wonder for a moment which one ate all those coconuts,
but then I remembered that Roc,

Jan


J. J. Lodder

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Mar 17, 2023, 5:00:53 PMMar 17
to
Then how did the avocado survive those 12 000 years
between mammoths and farmers?

Jan

Jerry Friedman

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Mar 17, 2023, 6:11:23 PMMar 17
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On Friday, March 17, 2023 at 3:00:53 PM UTC-6, J. J. Lodder wrote:
> Sam Plusnet <n...@home.com> wrote:
...

> > Isn't the avocado in the same situation?
> > i.e. Land animals big enough to swallow the stone & let it pass through
> > the digestive tract, were made extinct some time ago.
> >
> > https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/why-the-avocado-should-have-gone-t
> he-way-of-the-dodo-4976527/
> Then how did the avocado survive those 12 000 years
> between mammoths and farmers?

"It's a puzzle." However, the article says the seeds can't be dispersed,
not that they can't germinate.

The Wikipedia article on the Resplendent Quetzal says it eats wild
avocado fruit, thus helping to disperse the seeds. It shows a photograph
of a female with a wild avocado fruit (according to the caption) in her
beak.

Makes you wonder.

--
Jerry Friedman

Peter Moylan

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Mar 17, 2023, 9:41:49 PMMar 17
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On 17/03/23 22:13, J. J. Lodder wrote:

> That was Dodos. It seems Turkeys can sustitute,

Aren't we supposed to call them turkiyes now?

--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org

Jerry Friedman

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Mar 17, 2023, 11:40:07 PMMar 17
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Actually, the reference in Wikipedia only mentions another tree of the
same genus as the cultivated avocado, so maybe it makes you wonder
less.

--
Jerry Friedman