Jeri Taylor Interview, Part One

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FIRST, I'd like to thank John Ordover, Pocket Books Star Trek Editor,
and Pocket
Books for arranging this interview. Pocket Books is a RARE gem. John
and
Pocket Books have always endevoured to be receptive to fans. I would
like
to THANK Jeri Taylor for taking the time to answer ALL submitted
questions.

A audio clip of Kate Mulgrew reading of "Mosaic" and photo of Jeri
Taylor
and Kate Mulgrew are available at: www.simonsays.com/startrek/

I also like to thank everyone who submitted questions. It was hard
choosing some questions. I hope everyone enjoys this. MANY Rumors are
proven FALSE

THANK YOU

JERI TAYLOR QUESTIONS:


1) Kris Harah (from Warrenton, Missouri) asks:

Tackling a project that covers Janeway's life, although exciting, must
have
been a real challenge. Had you been mulling over this concept for some
time
or was there a flash of insight and the birth of a story? Thank you
very
much! I enjoy reading the Star Trek stories that cover the younger days
of
the characters (I've even taken up reading the Young Adult, Starfleet
Academy
series'). Getting information on their youth makes them seem more
rounded and
real.


Jeri's Answer:

The idea of doing Kathryn Janeway's backstory was born in the mind of
John
Ordover (Senior Editor at Pocket Books). He called to ask me to write a
novel -- which I had no business even contemplating, in that my "day
job" is
quite enough. But when I heard the idea, I melted. How could I resist
the
opportunity to create the life story of this fascinating woman?
Although
enticing, it was certainly a daunting challenge. I worked on weekends
only
from June 1995 until May, 1996. I didn't work from a detailed outline,
so I
often approached each writing day wondering what in the world I was
going to
write! Some says the "flash of insight" came to me, and other days it
was
just hard, hard work. But it was truly a reward experience.

Elizabeth Au (From San Francisco, Ca):

What personal experiences did you draw from to established Janeway's
life for
Mosaic?

Jeri's Answer:

I drew on a lot of my own experiences for this book, but I'll leave it
to the
reader to try and sort out just what they were! Certainly emotional
underpinnings were familiar to me, even thought the specifics may have
been
altered. Some things I will admit to: I was born and raised in Indiana;
I do
play tennis; and it took me even longer than Janeway to figure out what
makes
for a good relationship with a man.


Jan Schliecker (From Lubeck, Germany) asks:

Seeing as you are a Executive Producer and a co-creator of the Voyager
series, Will "Mosaic" be the first canonical Star Trek novel which is
not an
adaptation?

Jeri's Answer:

Yes, I expect "Mosaic" will be held as canon. I've already included
details
from the book in our episodes, and the other writers are starting to do
so as
well. This is a luxury I have as Executive Producer, and I intend to
indulge
it!


Jonathan Wallers (From Clovis, California) asks:

Do you feel by writing the story of Kathryn Janeway in the new book,
"Mosaic", will make it hard for the writers to develop and evolve her
character on Voyager?

Jeri's Answer:

I hope that having the book will make it easier, rather than harder, for
the
writers. I should think that having a more complete understanding of
where
she's come from would help everyone write her in an intelligent and
believable fashion.


Cindy Hill (from Denver, Colorado) asks:

Do you sometimes have to 'rein in' your male counterparts in order to
keep
Captain Janeway from becoming too masculine?

Jeri's Answer:

We are fortunate to have a staff of enlightened men on "Voyager." These
are
relatively young males who grew up after many of the early feminist
battles
were waged and consequently have a different perspective on gender from
the
men in my generation (who largely grew up with a decidedly traditional
view).
We all try to make here as complete and textured a character as
possible,
combining strength and authority with compassion and sensitivity. Kate
Mulgrew, of course, makes all those qualities blend seamlessly.


Juan Espada (from Miami, Florida) and Alicia McKenzie (from Boston, USA)
asks: How/when/where was the Janeway character born?

Jeri's Answer:

Kathryn Janeway evolved during the conceptualization of the series by
myself,
Rick Berman and Michael Piller. These discussions occurred in Rick's
office
over lunches, three days a week, over the course of a year (1993). We
all
knew when we started that we wanted a female captain, and that she had
to be
an extraordinary individual. I've always felt that I brought a lot of
myself
to the character, and of course when Kate was cast I had to "share"
her. In
a sense we are both Kathryn Janeway.


Yota Sotrichos (From Athens, Greece):

What characters did you, Rick Berman and Michael Piller conceive for the
main
Voyager ensemble cast, during early conceptual stages and brainstorming
sessions that were dropped or un-used? Who were they? And why were they
dropped? Thank you again for such a wonderful show!!! :)

Jeri's Answer:

We probably discussed every possible alien or combination of alien
species
that's ever existed on Star Trek, and tried to come up with intriguing
ones
that had never been done before. It's hard to remember what some of
them
were, though I do recall "an omnipotent being who had lost his powers,"
an
androgynous being, and a genetically engineered being. We also had
various
permutations of the gender and ethnicity of the crew: at one time the
Tactical Officer was seen to be a white male "hunk" and the Conn Officer
was
an ethnic male. As it turned out Tactical went to a black Vulcan and
Conn to
a white male. Kes' species were referred to as "Mayflies" for a long
time
because of their limited life span.

12) Lisa Striegl (From Littleton, Colorado) and Robert John Licuria
(from
Sydney, Australia) asks:

What tidbits can you give us on the upcoming season? Is the Voyager
going to
encounter the Borg this season? Will they FINALLY leave Kazon space?
And the
question we are all wanting an answer for...Do you have any insights on
the
relationship between Chakotay and Janeway??


Jeri's Answer:

Voyager will most definitely leave the Kazon behind after the opening
episode. Having them as recurring villains for two years now created
the
curious impression that we were standing still in space, instead of
streaking
at high warp speed toward the Alpha Quadrant. Yes, we will encounter
the
Borg, probably in February. November will bring an exciting spate of
shows,
including Voyager's visit to the Los Angeles of 1996! Q will also
re-visit
Voyager that month, hoping to convince Janeway to procreate with him.
As for
Janeway and Chakotay, I don't pretend to know where that's going, but
they
won't ignore what happened (whatever it was) on "New Earth." We'll keep
the
tension alive.


David Pannett (from New Zealand) asks:

Will there be a continuing commitment on the part of the Star Trek
production
team to make the series perhaps less 'Amero-centric' and more globally
inclusive? Thank you for including New Zealand within the Star Trek
universe
(the location of Paris' penal settlement).

Jeri's Answer:

I agree that we must continue to think globally, rather than locally.
Unfortunately, the fact that Voyager is in the Delta Quadrant means
that we
have fewer opportunities to reference Earth than if were in the old
Alpha
Quadrant stomping grounds. I'll try to look for chances to make our
humans a
more varied lot.


15) Maria Juarez (From Malrid, Spain) asks:

Being one of the few female on the Executive level at Paramount, Could
you
please describe a typical day writing and producing Star Trek: Voyager?

Jeri's Answer:

A typical day on Voyager? Wow -- it might take a book in itself to
cover
everything! I'll try to condense: My day begins at 5:00 am when I get
up
and go to a gym to work out. I get to he office between 7:00 and 7:30,
and
usually the phone is ringing as soon as I hit the door. Everyone knows
I'm
there early and they take advantage of that to get a few moments for
discussions about costumes, makeup, hairstyles, etc. Production of
course
is in full swing at that hour, so there are frequent calls from the
stage,
perhaps an actor requesting a line change (no one can change a word of
our
scripts without permission) or a director wanting to discuss staging.
These
calls go on unabated all during the day.

Story meetings, story "breaks" (the process through which we break down
a
story scene by scene prior to the script-writing stage) taking pitches
from
outside writers, brainstorming sessions among the staff, writing,
re-writing
-- are daily occupations. In addition, we have two production meetings
for
each episode, long affairs with the department heads in which every
aspect of
production is discussed so that we're all in accord. W also have an
opticals
meeting for each show, discussing what those shots are to be, how many
of
them what process will be used, etc.

I'm at the studio close to twelve hours every day. I usually eat lunch
at my
desk or the staff eats together as a working lunch. I frequently have
to
take work home -- a script or story to read -- at night. And on
weekends, of
course, I write novels! I have little other life besides my job, my
limited
free time being reserved for my husband and children (who are,
fortunately,
grown) I reserve an hour after work two days a week to play tennis,
because I
believe that and my morning workouts help me to relieve stress and stay
healthy.


Benny Afifi (Cairo, Egypt) and Sally Meyers (From Washington DC) ask:

What is your best advice you can give that aspiring sci-fi writers
wanting to
break into the science fiction television arena?

Jeri's Answer:

My advice to anyone wanting to be a writer is to get the broadest and
most
varied education possible, and to expose yourself to myriad life
experiences.
I wouldn't compartmentalize (i.e., read, study, or writer only science
fiction) but would generalize. A strong liberal arts education is
probably
the best foundation for many professions, including writing. Beyond
that,
write. Writing is a craft that must be studied and practiced. You
learn
something every time you write -- believe me, I'm still learning. And
if
it's sci-fi you ultimately aspire to, avail yourself of the Star Trek
script
submission policy. Call 213 956-8301 for the information hotline.


Kevin Feldsher, Age 9 (Houston, Texas) asks:

Besides Star Trek, What were your favorite sci-fi shows that you
regularly
watched? I like Kes, she is so pretty.

Jeri's Answer:

I agree that Kes is pretty! Be sure you look for an episode titled
"Warlord," to be seen in November. She's inhabited by the consciousness
of a
200 year-old warrior and becomes a brutal tyrant! As for shows I
watched in
the sci-fi vein -- I didn't! I'd never seen an episode of Star Trek
when I
took this job (at TNG -ed.), so I had a lot of catching up to do. I was
a
-reader- of science fiction, a fan of such writers as Ray Bradbury,
Manly
Wade Wellman, and A. E. Van Vogt.


Stephen Liddell (From Watford, London, England) and Martin Stahl (From
Mark
Theidenfeld, Germany) ask:

In the latest edition of the UK's "Star Trek Monthly" magazine there is
a
report mentioning that Paramount Studios are preparing to produce a
mini-series starring George Takei as Mr Sulu on his Excelsior. Is it
true
that this will happen this winter?

Jeri's Answer:

I'm not aware of any plans on the part of Paramount to produce such a
series
starring George Takei (and believe me, if they were planning it, I'd
have
heard).

Robert F. Lyons (From Anderson, Indiana, USA) asks:

I guess that this is a rather weird question, but here we go. We have
Chakotay, the XO who shows his spiritual/religious preferences. Tuvok,
as
well shows "spiritual" activities. It seems that the only people who
are not
represented are Jews, Christians, and Islamic. (i.e. modern Earth
religions).
Seeing as I am studying for the Catholic Priesthood in the Old Catholic
Church in North America, I must confess that it seems weird that we have
all
these odd alien religions and only one modern spirituality represented.
I
just wonder, where are the Big Three?

Jeri's Answer:

This is not a weird question; I get it frequently. Gene Roddenberry was
known as a "secular humanist," and eschewed traditional religions. He
firmly
believed that by the 24th century mankind would be past all that
mythical
"nonsense," and so decreed that Star Trek would not represent any of the
contemporary religions. You've never, for instance, seen a Christmas
episode. We've respected Gene's vision in all ways, including this
one. We
have, however, tried to introduce a sense of spirituality in some of the
characters, as man of us feel that this is undoubtedly a deep-seated
need in
many people.

Marko Perch (from Prince Edward Island, Canada) and Thomas Evans (From
New
Jersey, USA) both ask:

So, c'mon - no secrets - Is there any truth to the rumor that a major
member
of the Voyager cast will die this season? (As stated in the TV Guide)

Jeri's Answer:

I made it clear to TV Guide that there had been no discussions -- zero,
zip,
nada -- about killing one of the regular characters. They chose to
suggest
coyly that the producers were simply denying the rumor but that it had
validity. To this point we had not had any discussion about killing a
character.


Michael Talltrees (From Albany, New York, ) asks:

Being a Native American (Sioux Tribe), Will we ever learn what
Chakotay's
tribe is? Tribes are not created, they are lineage. I'm curious. Is his
a
fictional tribe? Many thanks to you, Rick Berman, and the writers for
your
positive portrayal of Native Americans on "Journey's End" and on
Voyager.

Jeri's Answer:

Chakotay's tribe is indeed fictional. We chose to do this in order not
to
offend, unintentionally, any existing tribe. We have set his lineage in
Central America as our Actor, Robert Beltran, is a descendant of the
indigenous people of that region.

Anny Wise (from the Republic of Ireland) asks:

To what extent do the Paramount Executives take notice of the Star Trek
fans
- for there appears to be drop off in fandom over the past two years and
many
have blamed Paramount's lack of concern?

Jeri's Answer:

I assure you that Paramount is extremely concerned when they see a
drop-off
in ratings. Some fans may be feeling that the studio doesn't relfect
their
individual opinions about the show, and that may be true. Much of the
influence of studio executives comes (rightly, I think) from the
exhuastive
research polls they take. Remember, people on the nets represent a very
small portion of our audience. While the online group is certianly among
our
most passionate, loyal, and intelligent fans, it does not necessarily
represent the opinions of the mass audience, and it's that mass audience
the
studio is concerned about.


JOHN ORDOVER QUESTION:

Mike Sherwood (From Phoenix, Arizona) asks:

Was it difficult editing Jeri Taylor on Mosaic? And will Jeri Taylor
being
doing any more books for Pocket Books?

John's Answer:

It was a pleasure editing Jeri. She's an excellent writer, with all the
enthusiasm of a first-novelist mixed with all the professionalism of a
old
hand. I'm pleased to say that Jeri has another book coming, PATHWAYS,
which
tells the story of how the lives of the rest of the crew led them to
Voyager.

Date
sent: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 19:50:49 -0700 (PDT)
From: Ruben Macias <end...@kaiwan.com>
To: zm...@apci.net
Subject: Warp 10: Jeri Taylor


FIRST, I like to John Ordover, Pocket Books Star Trek Editor, and Pocket
Books for arranging this interview. Pocket Books is a RARE gem. John
and
Pocket Books have always endevoured to be receptive to fans. I would
like
to THANK Jeri Taylor for taking the time to answer ALL submitted
questions.

A audio clip of Kate Mulgrew reading of "Mosaic" and photo of Jeri
Taylor
and Kate Mulgrew are available at: www.simonsays.com/startrek/

I also like to thank everyone who submitted questions. It was hard
choosing some questions. I hope everyone enjoys this. MANY Rumors are
proven FALSE

THANK YOU

JERI TAYLOR QUESTIONS:


1) Kris Harah (from Warrenton, Missouri) asks:

Tackling a project that covers Janeway's life, although exciting, must
have
been a real challenge. Had you been mulling over this concept for some
time
or was there a flash of insight and the birth of a story? Thank you
very
much! I enjoy reading the Star Trek stories that cover the younger days
of
the characters (I've even taken up reading the Young Adult, Starfleet
Academy
series'). Getting information on their youth makes them seem more
rounded and
real.


Jeri's Answer:

The idea of doing Kathryn Janeway's backstory was born in the mind of
John
Ordover (Senior Editor at Pocket Books). He called to ask me to write a
novel -- which I had no business even contemplating, in that my "day
job" is
quite enough. But when I heard the idea, I melted. How could I resist
the
opportunity to create the life story of this fascinating woman?
Although
enticing, it was certainly a daunting challenge. I worked on weekends
only
from June 1995 until May, 1996. I didn't work from a detailed outline,
so I
often approached each writing day wondering what in the world I was
going to
write! Some says the "flash of insight" came to me, and other days it
was
just hard, hard work. But it was truly a reward experience.

Elizabeth Au (From San Francisco, Ca):

What personal experiences did you draw from to established Janeway's
life for
Mosaic?

Jeri's Answer:

I drew on a lot of my own experiences for this book, but I'll leave it
to the
reader to try and sort out just what they were! Certainly emotional
underpinnings were familiar to me, even thought the specifics may have
been
altered. Some things I will admit to: I was born and raised in Indiana;
I do
play tennis; and it took me even longer than Janeway to figure out what
makes
for a good relationship with a man.


Jan Schliecker (From Lubeck, Germany) asks:

Seeing as you are a Executive Producer and a co-creator of the Voyager
series, Will "Mosaic" be the first canonical Star Trek novel which is
not an
adaptation?

Jeri's Answer:

Yes, I expect "Mosaic" will be held as canon. I've already included
details
from the book in our episodes, and the other writers are starting to do
so as
well. This is a luxury I have as Executive Producer, and I intend to
indulge
it!


Jonathan Wallers (From Clovis, California) asks:

Do you feel by writing the story of Kathryn Janeway in the new book,
"Mosaic", will make it hard for the writers to develop and evolve her
character on Voyager?

Jeri's Answer:

I hope that having the book will make it easier, rather than harder, for
the
writers. I should think that having a more complete understanding of
where
she's come from would help everyone write her in an intelligent and
believable fashion.


Cindy Hill (from Denver, Colorado) asks:

Do you sometimes have to 'rein in' your male counterparts in order to
keep
Captain Janeway from becoming too masculine?

Jeri's Answer:

We are fortunate to have a staff of enlightened men on "Voyager." These
are
relatively young males who grew up after many of the early feminist
battles
were waged and consequently have a different perspective on gender from
the
men in my generation (who largely grew up with a decidedly traditional
view).
We all try to make here as complete and textured a character as
possible,
combining strength and authority with compassion and sensitivity. Kate
Mulgrew, of course, makes all those qualities blend seamlessly.


Juan Espada (from Miami, Florida) and Alicia McKenzie (from Boston, USA)
asks: How/when/where was the Janeway character born?

Jeri's Answer:

Kathryn Janeway evolved during the conceptualization of the series by
myself,
Rick Berman and Michael Piller. These discussions occurred in Rick's
office
over lunches, three days a week, over the course of a year (1993). We
all
knew when we started that we wanted a female captain, and that she had
to be
an extraordinary individual. I've always felt that I brought a lot of
myself
to the character, and of course when Kate was cast I had to "share"
her. In
a sense we are both Kathryn Janeway.


Yota Sotrichos (From Athens, Greece):

What characters did you, Rick Berman and Michael Piller conceive for the
main
Voyager ensemble cast, during early conceptual stages and brainstorming
sessions that were dropped or un-used? Who were they? And why were they
dropped? Thank you again for such a wonderful show!!! :)

Jeri's Answer:

We probably discussed every possible alien or combination of alien
species
that's ever existed on Star Trek, and tried to come up with intriguing
ones
that had never been done before. It's hard to remember what some of
them
were, though I do recall "an omnipotent being who had lost his powers,"
an
androgynous being, and a genetically engineered being. We also had
various
permutations of the gender and ethnicity of the crew: at one time the
Tactical Officer was seen to be a white male "hunk" and the Conn Officer
was
an ethnic male. As it turned out Tactical went to a black Vulcan and
Conn to
a white male. Kes' species were referred to as "Mayflies" for a long
time
because of their limited life span.

12) Lisa Striegl (From Littleton, Colorado) and Robert John Licuria
(from
Sydney, Australia) asks:

What tidbits can you give us on the upcoming season? Is the Voyager
going to
encounter the Borg this season? Will they FINALLY leave Kazon space?
And the
question we are all wanting an answer for...Do you have any insights on
the
relationship between Chakotay and Janeway??


Jeri's Answer:

Voyager will most definitely leave the Kazon behind after the opening
episode. Having them as recurring villains for two years now created
the
curious impression that we were standing still in space, instead of
streaking
at high warp speed toward the Alpha Quadrant. Yes, we will encounter
the
Borg, probably in February. November will bring an exciting spate of
shows,
including Voyager's visit to the Los Angeles of 1996! Q will also
re-visit
Voyager that month, hoping to convince Janeway to procreate with him.
As for
Janeway and Chakotay, I don't pretend to know where that's going, but
they
won't ignore what happened (whatever it was) on "New Earth." We'll keep
the
tension alive.


David Pannett (from New Zealand) asks:

Will there be a continuing commitment on the part of the Star Trek
production
team to make the series perhaps less 'Amero-centric' and more globally
inclusive? Thank you for including New Zealand within the Star Trek
universe
(the location of Paris' penal settlement).

Jeri's Answer:

I agree that we must continue to think globally, rather than locally.
Unfortunately, the fact that Voyager is in the Delta Quadrant means
that we
have fewer opportunities to reference Earth than if were in the old
Alpha
Quadrant stomping grounds. I'll try to look for chances to make our
humans a
more varied lot.


15) Maria Juarez (From Malrid, Spain) asks:

Being one of the few female on the Executive level at Paramount, Could
you
please describe a typical day writing and producing Star Trek: Voyager?

Jeri's Answer:

A typical day on Voyager? Wow -- it might take a book in itself to
cover
everything! I'll try to condense: My day begins at 5:00 am when I get
up
and go to a gym to work out. I get to he office between 7:00 and 7:30,
and
usually the phone is ringing as soon as I hit the door. Everyone knows
I'm
there early and they take advantage of that to get a few moments for
discussions about costumes, makeup, hairstyles, etc. Production of
course
is in full swing at that hour, so there are frequent calls from the
stage,
perhaps an actor requesting a line change (no one can change a word of
our
scripts without permission) or a director wanting to discuss staging.
These
calls go on unabated all during the day.

Story meetings, story "breaks" (the process through which we break down
a
story scene by scene prior to the script-writing stage) taking pitches
from
outside writers, brainstorming sessions among the staff, writing,
re-writing
-- are daily occupations. In addition, we have two production meetings
for
each episode, long affairs with the department heads in which every
aspect of
production is discussed so that we're all in accord. W also have an
opticals
meeting for each show, discussing what those shots are to be, how many
of
them what process will be used, etc.

I'm at the studio close to twelve hours every day. I usually eat lunch
at my
desk or the staff eats together as a working lunch. I frequently have
to
take work home -- a script or story to read -- at night. And on
weekends, of
course, I write novels! I have little other life besides my job, my
limited
free time being reserved for my husband and children (who are,
fortunately,
grown) I reserve an hour after work two days a week to play tennis,
because I
believe that and my morning workouts help me to relieve stress and stay
healthy.


Benny Afifi (Cairo, Egypt) and Sally Meyers (From Washington DC) ask:

What is your best advice you can give that aspiring sci-fi writers
wanting to
break into the science fiction television arena?

Jeri's Answer:

My advice to anyone wanting to be a writer is to get the broadest and
most
varied education possible, and to expose yourself to myriad life
experiences.
I wouldn't compartmentalize (i.e., read, study, or writer only science
fiction) but would generalize. A strong liberal arts education is
probably
the best foundation for many professions, including writing. Beyond
that,
write. Writing is a craft that must be studied and practiced. You
learn
something every time you write -- believe me, I'm still learning. And
if
it's sci-fi you ultimately aspire to, avail yourself of the Star Trek
script
submission policy. Call 213 956-8301 for the information hotline.


Kevin Feldsher, Age 9 (Houston, Texas) asks:

Besides Star Trek, What were your favorite sci-fi shows that you
regularly
watched? I like Kes, she is so pretty.

Jeri's Answer:

I agree that Kes is pretty! Be sure you look for an episode titled
"Warlord," to be seen in November. She's inhabited by the consciousness
of a
200 year-old warrior and becomes a brutal tyrant! As for shows I
watched in
the sci-fi vein -- I didn't! I'd never seen an episode of Star Trek
when I
took this job (at TNG -ed.), so I had a lot of catching up to do. I was
a
-reader- of science fiction, a fan of such writers as Ray Bradbury,
Manly
Wade Wellman, and A. E. Van Vogt.


Stephen Liddell (From Watford, London, England) and Martin Stahl (From
Mark
Theidenfeld, Germany) ask:

In the latest edition of the UK's "Star Trek Monthly" magazine there is
a
report mentioning that Paramount Studios are preparing to produce a
mini-series starring George Takei as Mr Sulu on his Excelsior. Is it
true
that this will happen this winter?

Jeri's Answer:

I'm not aware of any plans on the part of Paramount to produce such a
series
starring George Takei (and believe me, if they were planning it, I'd
have
heard).

Robert F. Lyons (From Anderson, Indiana, USA) asks:

I guess that this is a rather weird question, but here we go. We have
Chakotay, the XO who shows his spiritual/religious preferences. Tuvok,
as
well shows "spiritual" activities. It seems that the only people who
are not
represented are Jews, Christians, and Islamic. (i.e. modern Earth
religions).
Seeing as I am studying for the Catholic Priesthood in the Old Catholic
Church in North America, I must confess that it seems weird that we have
all
these odd alien religions and only one modern spirituality represented.
I
just wonder, where are the Big Three?

Jeri's Answer:

This is not a weird question; I get it frequently. Gene Roddenberry was
known as a "secular humanist," and eschewed traditional religions. He
firmly
believed that by the 24th century mankind would be past all that
mythical
"nonsense," and so decreed that Star Trek would not represent any of the
contemporary religions. You've never, for instance, seen a Christmas
episode. We've respected Gene's vision in all ways, including this
one. We
have, however, tried to introduce a sense of spirituality in some of the
characters, as man of us feel that this is undoubtedly a deep-seated
need in
many people.

Marko Perch (from Prince Edward Island, Canada) and Thomas Evans (From
New
Jersey, USA) both ask:

So, c'mon - no secrets - Is there any truth to the rumor that a major
member
of the Voyager cast will die this season? (As stated in the TV Guide)

Jeri's Answer:

I made it clear to TV Guide that there had been no discussions -- zero,
zip,
nada -- about killing one of the regular characters. They chose to
suggest
coyly that the producers were simply denying the rumor but that it had
validity. To this point we had not had any discussion about killing a
character.

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