OT: New Years Customs

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The Vampire

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Dec 31, 2000, 4:23:00 PM12/31/00
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Since DS gave me a life long interest in folklore, does anyone have a New
Year's custom or superstition they practice?

My own:

1) Never do the laundry on New Year's day.

2) Eat black-eyed peas or Hoppin' John on New Year's Day for prosperity in the
coming year.

3) Make sure all salt cellers and pepper pots are full on New Year's Eve.

Anyone else? Florian, I'm sure you know what Hoppin' John is! Love that Low
Country food!

;-D


The Vampire

"Peepshow, creepshow
where did you get those eyes?"

Peek-a-boo
Siouxsie and the Banshees

Jeanannd

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Dec 31, 2000, 8:39:31 PM12/31/00
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I always do the wash on the first day of the year, and clean the condo.
It's sort of setting things in order for the first of the year.
--
jean...@home.com at

http://www.fellennium.com
the time is meow >^,,^<

"The Vampire" <vampi...@aol.comladder-5> wrote in message
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Guy Haines, II

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Dec 31, 2000, 10:27:42 PM12/31/00
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> Anyone else? Florian, I'm sure you know what Hoppin' John is! Love that
Low
> Country food!
>
In this neck of the woods, for good luck and prosperity through the new year
folks are supposed to eat pork and sour kraut on the first day of the year.
Guy


baldwidow

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Jan 1, 2001, 12:30:26 AM1/1/01
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My husband cooked Menudo. Who knows what that is? The smell--- kinda
like fumigating the house. lol

Jeanannd wrote in message ...

Tony Ning Lew

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Jan 1, 2001, 12:40:43 AM1/1/01
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In article <97832719...@chalk.odsgc.net>,
"baldwidow" <bald...@hotmail.com> wrote:

>My husband cooked Menudo. Who knows what that is?

Mexican tripe and hominy soup.

Voice of Sweet Lorraine

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Jan 1, 2001, 2:20:14 AM1/1/01
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Tony Ning Lew wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------------
This also explains everything I really needed to know about Ricky Martin
(former member of Menudo) ! <g>

V.o.S.L.

Tony Ning Lew

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Jan 1, 2001, 5:12:33 AM1/1/01
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In article <3A502FAD...@erols.com>,

Menudo's supposed to be good for hangovers!
(The soup, not the band.)


>
>V.o.S.L.
>


Dumorte

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Jan 1, 2001, 7:46:49 AM1/1/01
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I was always told to eat Hoppin' John for good luck and cabbage for wealth.

Sidney
Dumorte
You don't stop laughing because you grow old, you grow old because you stopped
laughing.

Knockknee

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Jan 1, 2001, 9:24:14 AM1/1/01
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In article <20010101074649...@ng-da1.aol.com>, dum...@aol.com
says...

>
>>> Anyone else? Florian, I'm sure you know what Hoppin' John is! Love that
>>Low
>>> Country food!
>>>
>>In this neck of the woods, for good luck and prosperity through the new year
>>folks are supposed to eat pork and sour kraut on the first day of the year.
>>
>
>I was always told to eat Hoppin' John for good luck and cabbage for wealth.
>
>
My grandmother used to chase me around with a spoonful of black-eyed peas on New
Year's, but I usually got away. <g>

Knockknee

Remove 'not so' before emailing!

MmeCo...@webtv.net

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Jan 1, 2001, 2:09:10 PM1/1/01
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Happy New Year to everyone in the shadows!

For many years this was our New Year custom:
my Albanian grandmother used to bake a spinach pie that had a coin
hidden in the crust. Whoever got the slice of pie with the coin was
supposed to have good fortune throughout the year. (For years, this was
the _only_ way I would eat spinach.) Gram wanted to make sure we all
prospered, so after the winner found the coin, she would give one to
everybody else at the table.

~Mamie Collins~
(distant cousin to *everybody*)

DSCOTT7972

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Jan 1, 2001, 4:49:56 PM1/1/01
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My wifes' Irish family used to hide a dime in cooked cabbage and whoever had
the dime in their piece was suppose to have good luck for the year. Danny.

Florian de Beaucastel

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Jan 1, 2001, 4:51:54 PM1/1/01
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On 31 Dec 2000 21:23:00 GMT, vampi...@aol.comladder-5 (The Vampire)
wrote:

>Since DS gave me a life long interest in folklore, does anyone have a New
>Year's custom or superstition they practice?
>
>My own:
>
>1) Never do the laundry on New Year's day.
>
>2) Eat black-eyed peas or Hoppin' John on New Year's Day for prosperity in the
>coming year.
>
>3) Make sure all salt cellers and pepper pots are full on New Year's Eve.

Yes, to fend off poverty in the new year, make sure you fill up the
shakers, and make sure coins are in your pockets. And don't let the
fire go out. However, emptying the last dregs from a bottle of drink
before midnight brings fortune!


>
>Anyone else? Florian, I'm sure you know what Hoppin' John is! Love that Low
>Country food!
>

I'll testify to that, Vampire! I was praising the qualities of
Hoppin' John at a New Year's Eve party last night, and explaining what
it was to my non-Southern acquaintances. I usually eat it with turnip
greens. That way you have black-eyed peas for pennies and greens for
dollars in the new year.

Another superstition I have heard of, but can't practice because I'd
jinx things:

If the first man to walk into the house after midnight has dark hair
and is carrying a shovel of coal then a year of good luck follows. if
the first to cross the threshold is a woman, or fair-haired man like
poor Florian, then bad luck can be expected.

Happy New Year!

Florian dB

Knockknee

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Jan 1, 2001, 5:15:01 PM1/1/01
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In article <olt15tovm7fnfuic0...@4ax.com>, Florian says...


Oh, that's from northern England! It's called first-footing.

The Vampire

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Jan 1, 2001, 6:26:18 PM1/1/01
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>I always do the wash on the first day of the year

I got that particular superstition from my grandmother. She always said "If
you wash clothes on New Year's Day someone will die in the family in the coming
year." Two other variations are washing away good luck or the good memories of
the previous year.

I'm not sure of the country origin of this particular belief but according to
the NC Museum of Natural History it's a popular practice in the eastern part of
NC.

The Vampire

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Jan 1, 2001, 6:33:59 PM1/1/01
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>I usually eat it with turnip
>greens. That way you have black-eyed peas for pennies and greens for
>dollars in the new year.

Our variation is eating it with collard greens. I hate collard greens, but it
has been demanded that I cook collard greens this evening to ward off any
financial reversals or impending recessions in the coming year. Now I'll have
to open up the windows and let in the night air...which leads to another
superstition....

;-D

Thank God for Thrifty Maid brand canned collard greens...
And Happy New Year to all!

The Vampire

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Jan 1, 2001, 6:38:04 PM1/1/01
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>I was always told to eat Hoppin' John for good luck and cabbage for wealth.

I turned up my nose at the custom last year and had nothing but damnation for
the entire year. You can be sure I'll have my share of greens and black-eyed
peas this year!

The Vampire

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Jan 1, 2001, 6:42:32 PM1/1/01
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Thanks to all for sharing. Everyone have a wonderful New Year!

Jeanannd

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Jan 1, 2001, 8:17:47 PM1/1/01
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There are some state New Years traditions...and organizational as well. The
polar bear club here in Colorado all go swimming in Cherry Creek reservoir
and other frozen lakes and rivers on the first day of the year, and
apparently in other states as well.

The first day of the year is another traditional sale day for more then a
few stores.

Most government and Federal agencies are closed, including the Federal
Reserve. This means all banks and credit unions are also closed, which
means I had off today....Hurrah !!!!
--
jean...@home.com at

http://www.fellennium.com
the time is meow >^,,^<

"DSCOTT7972" <dscot...@aol.com> wrote in message
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DivaM...@webtv.net

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Jan 1, 2001, 8:59:33 PM1/1/01
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<My husband cooked Menudo.   Who knows what that is?>

I'm not sure, but I understand whenever one of the ingredients gets too
old, it gets replaced with a newer one : )

But then, Ricky Martin is one hot Latin dish at any age!

DivaMagenta @>~~>~~>~~~~
It is as likely that the world and all of the wonders within it are the
result of mere chance as it is that a masterpiece comes to life without
an artist to guide the brushstrokes...

http://community.webtv.net/DivaMagenta/DivasDarkShadowsPage

pansyfaye

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Jan 2, 2001, 12:09:59 AM1/2/01
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Knockknee <knoc...@notsohotmail.com> wrote in message
news:92q3u...@drn.newsguy.com...
What happened when you didn't???

pansy


Tony Ning Lew

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Jan 2, 2001, 12:43:27 AM1/2/01
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In article <97832719...@chalk.odsgc.net>,
"baldwidow" <bald...@hotmail.com> wrote:

>My husband cooked Menudo. Who knows what that is? The smell--- kinda
>like fumigating the house. lol

Here's a recipe:


MENUDO ESTILO NORTENO
(Northern Mexican Style Tripe and Hominy soup)

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Soups Mexican

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 Calf's foot (1 to 1-1/2 lb)
4 qt Water
2 lb Honeycomb tripe
3 lg Chiles anchos
1 Large onion
2 Canned, peeled green chiles
3 Cloves garlic, peeled
1 1/2 c Canned hominy
6 Peppercorns
1 t Oregano
2 ts Salt, or to taste

Cut the calf's foot into four pieces. Cut the tripe
into small squares. Put them into the pan with the
onion, garlic, peppercorns, salt, and water. Cover and
bring to a boil. Lower the flame, open the windows(!)
and simmer uncovered for about 2 hours, or until the
tripe and foot are just tender but not too soft.
Meanwhile, toast the chiles anchos well on a dry
skillet, turning them from time to time until the skin
is charred. Slit them open (wearing rubber gloves, if
you like keeping your skin) and remove the seeds and
veins. Grind them dry to a fine powder. Add it to the
pot as the meat is cooking. Remove the pieces of the
calf's foot from the pan, and when they are cool
enough to handle, strip off the fleshy parts. Chop
them roughly and return them to the pan. Add the
hominy and continue cooking the menudo slowly, still
uncovered, for another two hours. Adjust the salt to
taste. Sprinkle with oregano and serve.

>

Tony Ning Lew

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Jan 2, 2001, 12:46:16 AM1/2/01
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In article <20010101074649...@ng-da1.aol.com>,
dum...@aol.com (Dumorte) wrote:

>>> Anyone else? Florian, I'm sure you know what Hoppin' John is! Love that
>>Low
>>> Country food!
>>>
>>In this neck of the woods, for good luck and prosperity through the new year
>>folks are supposed to eat pork and sour kraut on the first day of the year.
>>
>
>I was always told to eat Hoppin' John for good luck and cabbage for wealth.

Hoppin' John = Black Eyed peas and rice:

Title: Hoppin' John
Categories: Southern, Low country
Yield: 6 servings

1 c Small dried peas such as
-cowpeas or black-eyes
6 c Water
1 Dried hot pepper (opt)
1 Smoked ham hock
1 md Onion, chopped (~3/4 cup)
1 c Long-grain white rice

Wash and sort the peas. Place them in a saucepan, add the water, and
discard any peas that float. Gently boil the peas with the pepper, ham
hock and onion, uncovered, until tender but not mushy - about 1 1/2
hours - or until 2 cups of liquid remain. Add the rice to the pot,
cover, and simmer for about 30 minutes, never lifting the lid.

Remove from the heat and allow to steam, still covered, for another 10
minutes. Remove the cover, fluff with a fork, and serve immediately.

from &quot;Hoppin' John's Lowcountry Cooking,&quot; Bantam Books,
Copyright 1992 by John Martin Taylor

Knockknee

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Jan 2, 2001, 9:38:46 AM1/2/01
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In article <Hod46.91008$w35.16...@news1.rdc1.nj.home.com>, "pansyfaye"
says...
Someday I will write a book called The Horror of Peas. <shudder> She caught
me, I ate 'em, she was satisfied that I'd have good luck, I'd run to eat
something else, *anything* else, to get the awful mealy taste out of my mouth.

Gaaaaaah. Peas.

Cramnella

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Jan 2, 2001, 11:01:18 AM1/2/01
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>
>
>Knockknee

LOL! My aunt feels the same as you where black-eyed peas are concerned and her
policy is to eat a single pea on New Years day.

Marc Allen

Knockknee

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Jan 2, 2001, 12:28:26 PM1/2/01
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In article <20010102110118...@ng-xb1.aol.com>, cram...@aol.com
says...

>
>>
>>
>>Knockknee
>
>
>
>LOL! My aunt feels the same as you where black-eyed peas are concerned and her
>policy is to eat a single pea on New Years day.


The Great Pea Compromise!

baldwidow

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Jan 2, 2001, 1:36:39 PM1/2/01
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Tony Ning Lew wrote in message <92rpll$l65$1...@slb6.atl.mindspring.net>...

>In article <97832719...@chalk.odsgc.net>,
> "baldwidow" <bald...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>My husband cooked Menudo. Who knows what that is? The smell--- kinda
>>like fumigating the house. lol
>
>Here's a recipe:
>

Thanks, but no thanks. The recipe shows that there is a lot involved in
cooking it. My husband would spend all night making it perfect. I guess
the person cooking it wouldn't be the same one with the hangover, since you
can't cook it while drunk.

The Vampire

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Jan 2, 2001, 8:33:54 PM1/2/01
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> I'd run to eat
>something else, *anything* else, to get the awful mealy taste out of my
>mouth.

There good with ketchup too!

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